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Discussion Starter #23
There is no product on that world to just polish corroded surface on mirror shine-After straightening you need to sand it,than watersanding from p600 up to p2000,prepolishing paste+wd 40 spray or oil,finish paste+wd40.
I am not shure but those trims are anodised like 105 serie?
Yes. I know this. Once the anodizing is removed, I start with 220 grit sand paper, and work my way up. Once I reach 2000 grit I take the parts to the buffer and see how they look. If they are still not as nice as I'd like, I go back to the sand paper and start again. Sometimes if the sanding scratches are very fine I'll try some scotch bright or steel wool, then back to the buffer.

Your parts look fantastic. Mine should look very similar when I'm done with them.

Will
 

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If the trim is not anodized - and it may be - wet & dry sandpaper may do the trick starting with coarser grit and working towards 600 and then using metal polish afterwards, eg simichrome, autosol, weenol. Make sure you tape /protect areas you don't want to sand. This has certainly worked for me on bikes.

105 window trim feels anodized however - I would not touch that; not sure about 750/101 whether that was anodized or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
So, I tackled the trim over the weekend. I started with 220 grit sandpaper and progressed to 1500 grit before using 0000 steel wool, then taking it to the buffing wheel. On the buffing wheel I made several passes with emory compound before working my way to a tripoli compound. I was unable to remove all the pitting, but considering how much electrolysis damage there was, I think I made everything pretty presentable. Its got some patina to it, but minimal scratches or other deep imperfections. Its now so bright that it was hard to take pictures of.
Before:




After:





It still has a little buffing residue on it, and I actually tried to make the pitting stand out as much as possible, in person it doesn't look nearly as bad as it does in the pics. Each piece took me about 6 hrs to do from start to finish. I managed not to bend anything. Using the buffing wheel was a bit stressful, but as long as I was very careful, I never had an issue. The wheel was the only way to do this, I minimized the major imperfections in it, and eliminated a good portion of the minor ones.

Will
 

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Not sure exactly which part you're talking about, but I'd recommend testing to see if it's anodized before going any further. Simple test, use chrome polish, Simichrome etc on a clean white rag. Rub it in a little and rub it off. If it's black, it's probably anodized and I'll require electrolytic removal. If not you're good to go with polishing.

You can do this on the car with a jewelers rouge compound and a small circular sisal buff pad mounted onto a variable speed drill. Don't be afraid to lean into it a little, low speed relative that of a to a buffer/polisher will keep you from catching,and bending it or screwing up the paint work.

If you want to go hands free and the part is off the car, Amazon sells an electric drill holder for 25 bucks that will clamp to a workbench. I'm doing a Facel Vega right now that every **** bright part is stainless and this technique is doing great. Good luck with your project.

Kevin Murray
Schaumburg, IL
L
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Not sure exactly which part you're talking about, but I'd recommend testing to see if it's anodized before going any further. Simple test, use chrome polish, Simichrome etc on a clean white rag. Rub it in a little and rub it off. If it's black, it's probably anodized and I'll require electrolytic removal. If not you're good to go with polishing.

You can do this on the car with a jewelers rouge compound and a small circular sisal buff pad mounted onto a variable speed drill. Don't be afraid to lean into it a little, low speed relative that of a to a buffer/polisher will keep you from catching,and bending it or screwing up the paint work.

If you want to go hands free and the part is off the car, Amazon sells an electric drill holder for 25 bucks that will clamp to a workbench. I'm doing a Facel Vega right now that every **** bright part is stainless and this technique is doing great. Good luck with your project.

Kevin Murray
Schaumburg, IL
L
Its already polished. Wasn't anodized, just very seriously corroded and dull. The door sill trim plates were anodized, but were easily stripped with "easy off". They were dull after stripping, but 10 min on the buffing wheel fixed that.

Will
 

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Hi

Apologies for parachuting into this thread which is proving quite interesting
Anybody knows where can we buy the aluminum trim for the windscreen and rear window of a Giulietta Sprint 1959?
I have the one for the windscreen but I am missing the one for the rear window...

Thank you and rgds
Carlos
 

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Another question related to this topic:
My trim pieces are full of very dried black sealant on the back of the visible surfaces...any suggestions on how to soften this in order to remove it easily?

Again many thanks
Rgds
Carlos
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Hi

Apologies for parachuting into this thread which is proving quite interesting
Anybody knows where can we buy the aluminum trim for the windscreen and rear window of a Giulietta Sprint 1959?
I have the one for the windscreen but I am missing the one for the rear window...

Thank you and rgds
Carlos
Carlos, there is a full set on ebay right now. Alfa Romeo Sprint Front and Rear Window Trims Giulietta Giulia Windshield Veloce | eBay
and a rear window with it.
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Giulia Sprint Back Window Amp Trim RARE Clear 750 101 | eBay

Another question related to this topic:
My trim pieces are full of very dried black sealant on the back of the visible surfaces...any suggestions on how to soften this in order to remove it easily?
I've found the same thing with my trim as well. For much of the stuff, I ended up sanding the stuff by hand till I was down to almost nothing, then wiped it with acetone. It wasn't a fast process.

This brings up another question however. What is the best stuff to use to replace the black sealant on parts? I found tons of the black hardened stuff around the rear quarter windows on my car. It was there for a reason, what should be used to replace it?

Thanks,
Will
 

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Andrew is right, expect to be disappointed. And go from there.

You won't get all the pits out because they are just too deep and you'll warp or wrinkle the edge and this damage can be seen from 20 feet away. I'm a fan of using a Dremel tool and softBlock with wet/dry sandpaper. You'll end up removing the anodization if your goal is to achieve a uniform appearance.

On two daily drivers with really bad trim that I know would have taken 100 plus hours to get to looking just "okay" I resorted to painting the trim with ALUMI BLAST paint. This paint adheres well to the properly prepared aluminum. (I'll use a product like ALUMABRITE ™ to remove the corrosion then prime with an etching primer.)

Some additional advice that I found useful if you resort to painting.

The paint on the trim surrounding the front windscreen has just a few nicks after driving the car approximately 17,000 miles. The rear trim, also painted, has no defects in its paint. The cars have been driven through rain and fog at highway speeds, but not hail nor sandstorms at any speed. YMMV.
 

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If the trim is not anodized - and it may be - wet & dry sandpaper may do the trick starting with coarser grit and working towards 600 and then using metal polish afterwards, eg simichrome, autosol, weenol. Make sure you tape /protect areas you don't want to sand. This has certainly worked for me on bikes.

105 window trim feels anodized however - I would not touch that; not sure about 750/101 whether that was anodized or not.
Anodized aluminum does not conduct electricity very well. An ohm meter can be used to check if a surface is anodized. Lightly touch the tips of the ohmmeter probes to the trim's surface: if the resistance is above 100 ohms there is an oxide layer on the aluminum. Intact anodization has a resistance in the mega ohms.
 
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