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Hi all,

Trying to find a thread about lower the front of a gtv6 but couldn't find one with detail discription. In need of some help?
 

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Hi JKromeo,

Try searching for "lower torsion bar" for example, you'll find this thread among others that cover the subject:

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/alfetta-gtv6-1975-1986/129895-safe-lowering-front-end-83-gtv-2-0-a.html

While considering going lower, I'd seriously consider upgrading to stiffer (larger diameter) bars aswell as you could end up with a ground clearance issue with the original "soft" suspension in a lower setting.

Just my 2 cents...

Best of luck and happy motoring!

/Martin
 

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I can only say that the hard part isn't lowering the suspension height in front, it's re-adjusting the camber afterwards.
 

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camber adjustment after lowering

I can only say that the hard part isn't lowering the suspension height in front, it's re-adjusting the camber afterwards.
This is really quite easy, relatively. Remove the spacers between the lower control arm and the frame. shorten by cutting, grinding, machining and reinstall, shim to desired camber setting.

There should be more info floating around here on the BB or maybe on AlfaGTV6.com or the Alfa Digest
 

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Hi all,Trying to find a thread about lower the front of a gtv6 but couldn't find one with detail discription. In need of some help?
Here you go. This is from the European Car magazine GTV6 project series of articles.

Ride Height Adjustment
Ride height adjustment is carried out by rotating the torsion bars with respect to the indices on the front lower A-arms and rear mount within the cross member. The bars are provided with a different number of splines (35 front, 34 rear) at each end, essentially a vernier scale, allowing precise adjustments to be made. When removing the bars, take care not to switch them over. The bars are marked by the following code: Left by a yellow mark and the letter S or L: right by a blue mark and the letter D or R. You shouldn't have to worry about this since the bars don't need to be fully removed to be adjusted, but I included it here just in case.

Using a marker, grease pencil or scribe, mark the position of the factory indices on the A-arm and cross member in relation to the splines on the bars. By employing the torsion bar removal tool or your substitute (you cheapskate), withdraw the torsion bars to the rear so that the splines are completely free. Complete the ride height adjustment by rotating the torsion bar by one tooth at each for every 1.5 mm to 2.0 mm of required adjustment. Viewing the bars from the rear, rotate the right side bar counterclock wise to lower the car and clockwise to raise the car. You adjust the left bar in the same manner, but rotate the bar clockwise to lower the ride height and counterclockwise to raise it.

Use this formula to correct ride height: (amount of required correction in inches) divided by .059 (number of splines rotated). Round off the number of splines to be rotated, such as 10.4 is read as 10.

Reinsert the bars, remembering to permanently mark the original factory indices, and temporarily mark your new splines corresponding to the factory indices. These may be marked permanently once you've verified the new ride height, but always distinguish them from the original factory reference marks.
 

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Then there is the quick and dirty way. The way I did mine.

Remove the lower control arms (A arms), leave the rear of the torsion bars in the factory position. Rotate the A arm one spline on the bar and reassemble. You will need to cut or grind about 1/4" off the spacers in order to regain correct camber.

This results in a fairly significant drop of the front end and you'll want to avoid speed bumps if you intend to keep your exhaust system for very long. But, mine has been this way for several years and with a little care I have not ripped the underside off the car. Yet.

Also, if you do it this way you'll want to buy shorter "sport" rear springs (IAP, Centerline) to balance the rear ride height to the front.
 

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US-Europe difference?

This seems a good place to ask this.
I've seen many references to the US-spec front end being higher than the European. Apparently, the front end had to be raised to enhappy the DOT?

How much was it raised? Also, I would guess that the European height is what the geometry was designed for, shim and spacer-wise?
 
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