Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have quotes going all over the place (I'll let you know what and who I went with), how much have you paid to get your flywheel turned??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
$18 at the local auto machine shop.

In and out the same day too.
So if a Alfa specialist shop quotes $150 I should ignore them and the experience they have with Alfa flywheels and have a less than perfect turn elsewhere?? (sarcasm-don't take it to heart Tifosi).
Anyone else have an estimate, I wasn't kidding about the $150 price quote from a "specialist" in Alfa's...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,984 Posts
I bet you know this but I will say it anyways.
how much is you legs worth?
I would say buy a new aluminum(very light) or a new steel one.
the stock can be reduced a tiny bit, but it seems that it is just not worth the risk.
They have exploded too many times when lightened to risk it in my book.

edit: if you do, there is a right up on the web of where to cut and how much. I have the link at home but is has been posted here before so a search should find it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I bet you know this but I will say it anyways.
how much is you legs worth?
I would say buy a new aluminum(very light) or a new steel one.
the stock can be reduced a tiny bit, but it seems that it is just not worth the risk.
Thay have exploded too many times when lightened to risk it in my book.
SPEC has new aluminum ones for $600. I was talking about turning, not lightening them, just like you do for your rotors when you put new brakes on, except this is a new clutch, not a brake pad...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,984 Posts
OK just a resurface then. yea just about any where then. they just need to remove the same amount on both surfaces. should be cheap. I have had them only do the clutch surface (bad). And you will get a slipping clutch after a short while.
so tell them to do both. they should know this but I have seen this happen many times where they do not do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
OK just a resurface then. yea just about any where then. they just need to remove the same amount on both surfaces. should be cheap. I have had them only do the clutch surface (bad). And you will get a slipping clutch after a short while.
so tell them to do both. they should know this but I have seen this happen many times where they do not do it.
It's a brand new pressure plate, no reason to have them do the surface on it as well.
 

·
1966-2013
Joined
·
13,741 Posts
sarcasm-don't take it to heart Tifosi
No worries :)

The shop I use has been around for decades, has a dedicated flywheel machine, and the person who does the turning has been there for about ever. (I can remember back to when he first got hired, now he owns the place)

I know for sure the work is quality and have personally known the specific person who does it for many years now. There's two other shops around that offer the same service, but one charges around $100 and takes about a week to get it done, the other has been around longest of all and I wouldn't have them sharpen a pencil for me let alone let them touch anything that required precision.

If you want to see serious billing, get a fully built race kart engine from him (you'll be looking at around 10 grand)

Kinda like my radiator guy. In business since the 1960's, old, a little slow, and more than a bit course in his human relations, (in fact he's almost hateful), but he produces the finest work I've seen anywhere, ever.

What you were asking about was someone you just stumbled across without any personal reference or past experience with ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,166 Posts
Shouldn't they also be balanced?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
What you were asking about was someone you just stumbled across without any personal reference or past experience with ;)
I've not even owned my Alfa for a year yet, so no, I don't know alot of the resources out there for it, it takes time to find people who can and will work on them. As far as the flywheel goes: $25 to turn, charged $5 a pin (3 pins) to remove before turning and then reinstall. $40 total. Drivetrain Specialist, 4548 Pinnacle Road, Cincinnati, OH 45246. These people I do have years of experience with, they did my rear end in my 1969 Impala with a 454, changed the 4.1:1 posi over to a Powertrax 4.56:1 unit, also have done my fathers work vans, everything from trans to rear end, driveshafts and u-joints. The other place that quoted me $150 I won't mention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Shouldn't they also be balanced?
Not unless you want to remove your crank, rods and pistons and have them all balanced together...which is almost redundant on a inline 4, not so much on a V6 or V8 or flat opposed four...
 

·
Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP,
Joined
·
16,232 Posts
Whoever turns the flywheel, ensure that they know to remove equal amounts from the disc and pressure plate surfaces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Me thinks I should have shopped around some more...
That is the jist of this post along with the rebuilding of transmission post I made ($150 for labor for a transmission rebuild)...Just because we own an Italian Sports car does not mean we should expect to pay premium prices for repairs or parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
22.5mm +/- .2mm
.88" +/- .01"
That is what is not making sense...If you replace your pressure plate, you're going to have additional material from that which was worn from the old. If you replace both plate and flywheel then those tolerances get even closer to each other. How would you turn one or the other with the factory specs not being out so far from one another?? Considering my clutch in the 90 spider is self adjusting, I'm not so sure how any of this actually applies...someone please correct my understanding of this...
 

·
1966-2013
Joined
·
13,741 Posts
The specs above are for the distance from the flywheel clutch friction surface to the upper edge of the flywheel where the pressure plate pins are.

If the pressure plate is replaced with the clutch change, (I myself wouldn't do it any other way), then the distance between the pressure plate friction surface and the flywheel friction surface would be within tolerance regardless as the flywheel would have been machined to spec and the new pressure plate would have been manufactured to its spec.

Realisitaclly, it's dealing more with spring pressure on the clutch plate rather than distance, as the distance determines the spring pressure :)

The only thing 'self adjusting' on your clutch is that the slave cylinder only retracts as far as the clutch fork pushes it back, and the resevoir compensates by ensuring there is more fluid volume than the system requires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
The specs above are for the distance from the flywheel clutch friction surface to the upper edge of the flywheel where the pressure plate pins are.

If the pressure plate is replaced with the clutch change, (I myself wouldn't do it any other way), then the distance between the pressure plate friction surface and the flywheel friction surface would be within tolerance regardless as the flywheel would have been machined to spec and the new pressure plate would have been manufactured to its spec.

Realisitaclly, it's dealing more with spring pressure on the clutch plate rather than distance, as the distance determines the spring pressure :)

The only thing 'self adjusting' on your clutch is that the slave cylinder only retracts as far as the clutch fork pushes it back, and the resevoir compensates by ensuring there is more fluid volume than the system requires.
And yet, if I bought, and I have, a new pressure plate and clutch, the distance will be closer to a new flywheel, if it is a turned old flywheel than that distance will be more than likely greater than the +/- .5mm specs you provided. If someone used a new clutch, but old pressure plate and flywheel and had those turned (and many people do) than that distance gets even more dramatically farther apart (flywheel to pressure plate disc). As far as I've seen, there are no shims to place anywhere to make up for a used rebuild and yet those rebuilds still work-everyday...I'm still confused, do you have a flow chart or cliff notes I could follow??? (kidding-humor is better than anything else, right?).
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top