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Hi guys.

i’ve been keeping eye on the classic alfa and lancia market for a few years now. Come next summer i might be thinkin about buying a giulia super orfulvia coupe.

Prices for these cars seem to be all over the place. At one point there might be many nice examples for decent price and forward few months and the prices has sky rocketed like 3000 euros.

I am mainly interested in giulia super 1300 as it has decent power and prices seem to be ok aswel. Im looking for a car in northen part of clntinental europe so germany, netherlands, denmark and so on. Goal is to buy good running car with solid body. Im not looking for a show car. Body can have some marks and not everything need to be top level.

What should one pay for such example?
 

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Least expensive version of the Super is the 1300 Nuova. I purchased my car back in 2010. It was quite rusty and spent more on making it nice then what I paid for it.
Try to avoid a rusty car - other things like interior, engine and suspension are easy to work on and parts are available.
 

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First series 1600 Super (65-67) is the most valuable other than a real TI Super, which is in a league much higher. For years $25K was the going price for a good one, but now it can be $35-40K for a really good car. 1300 variants were generally in the $15-20K range, Supers bringing more than TIs. Others fall around that, there are many specific variations that can be hard to tell apart til you do some research. Also, folks, including sellers, online auction sites, frequently get the model designation wrong. A 1300 TI is different from a 1600 TI is different from a 1300 Super, etc. All use basically the same shell but the details differ. And they're easy to modify/revise/fake, whether revealed or not.

It all comes down to condition first, and completeness. Rust, accident damage, which engine, which interior, which trim and badging, etc. Takes some time to learn the differences. There are a couple good sticky threads here on it. Most cars right now are on Bringatrailer, some on Hemmings, some ebay, but ebay cars tend to languish for good reasons at unrealistic prices. Bringatrailer listing, at least you have us in the peanut gallery to point out issues and attempt to keep the seller and BaT honest.

In general cars in the Netherlands are the best. Barn find cars in Italy can be good but often they have not been used and need a lot of bringing up to condition. Recently restored cars, especially from Europe, are a big unknown without an inspection and knowing who did the work and what was done. Importing is its own issue. I'm trying to help a guy now who brought a US-market Berlina from Canada, and even though it used to be registiered in California, California is now making him jump through a lot of hoops to get it licensed. So do your research there too.

Andrew
 

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I'll offer you the advice I usually give to people trying to sell a vintage car: the market is NOT completely rational. It isn't like buying a new product. As the previous posts have pointed out, the condition of a vintage car has a huge influence on its selling price. Smart buyers consider the total budget for getting the car on the road - not just the purchase price - so a rusted, non-running or incomplete car is going to sell for less (even if it looks great in the pictures).

How a car is marketed also greatly influences its ultimate price. Here in the States, buying a car from Bring a Trailer seems result in the highest price. At the other end of the spectrum, local ads (Craigslist here) reaches fewer people, generally present the cars poorly, and result in the lowest prices.
 

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Good points. The Alfa market is more rational than some, look at old Porsches. Fantasy Junction just sold a 1974 911 Carrera Euro model with mechanical injection, incredible car, not the same car as the US market car. Identical pretty much to the 1973 911 Carrera in performance but has the bigger bumpers, making it worth half or less. No different in the driving, just in the looking. The market likes what it likes. Like the stock market.
Andrew
 
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