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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to remove the slave and I don't know the proper way. I slave is leaking like crazy and the new ones on the way. The old one just doesn't want to leave....please help.
 

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You need to use one of those pliers that can spread open the clips around the slave cylinder. The name of the tool escapes me right now, but it is readily available (Auto Zone, Murrays, Sears, etc.).

Buehler? Buehler?
 

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I call them snap ring pliers, don't know if that's the right name.
Get the biggest ones you can find, those clips are a pain in the a$$
 

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While you are replacing the slave be sure to replace the rubber hose from the slave to the hard line. Its cheap and you're down there anyway.
 

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Yes, they're snap-ring pliers. Get the largest pair they have available and either internal/external or just external. The slave is held in place bu two snap rings you need to widen then slide off. It will make sense when you get under there with the right pliers. Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
where are they

rmatteo said:
Yes, they're snap-ring pliers. Get the largest pair they have available and either internal/external or just external. The slave is held in place bu two snap rings you need to widen then slide off. It will make sense when you get under there with the right pliers. Hope this helps!
the slave has a heavy looking sleeve around it that is atached to the tran, do the rings sit inside of that?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
does the slave just slide forward after the clips are off. I was under the car and didn't see the clips. where are they at?
 

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The clips wrap around the body of the slave. There are two of them, if memory serves. The clips each have a pair of eyelets where the snap ring pliers fit in. The pliers can spread the clip, expanding it out of the groove in the slave body where it sits. Once the clip is out of the groove, it can be slid along the slave body and the slave can be slid out.
 

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Yes, I believe there is one snap ring on each end of the cylinder mount. The slave cyl. is supposed to slide through except for the flex hose being attached. On my '79 I could take the flex hose loose from the hard line coming down from the master cylinder. If you had the tranny yoke out or moved aside (don't know if that is possible) you could slip the cylinder out either direction, depending on which clip was easier to remove. As it is, though, you'll probably want to take the one off at the business end of the cylinder and slide it out toward the front of the car. Hope this helps....

Michael
 

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Dealing with the snap rings is the worst part of replacing the clutch slave. There are two. One on each side of the cylinder to hold it in the housing. They are pretty much flush with the mount so you have to look closely. Having beefy snap ring pliers helps as they can be a major PITA. My pliers were really big enough so it took about 1/2 hour to get the freakin' things off. You will not be able to do it without the pliers so if you don't have some go get some.

I actually just replaced mine last week. Also, if you are taking the time to do the slave you'll want to take the time to change out the hose and the clutch master as well. If the clutch master is old the increased pressure from the good slave will cause it to crap out sooner than later. It's worth it to replace the whole system.

A tip on installing the new slave. You'll have to either slide the new one in from the side that the clutch release lever is on. If you do this then you will have to get a big breaker bar and muscle it so you can slip the new slave in (be careful not to be a total meathead and screw something up). If you cannot get it to move (it's not easy) then you'll have to slide the slave in from the "rear". This means you will have to CAREFULLY remove the metal ring holding the rubber boot on. This will leave the piston exposed. Now you can slide it in from the "rear". Be very very careful not to get any crud in it. Once it's in place re-attach the clip nearest the clutch lever thingy. Now you can put the boot with the push rod back on. After that snap the last ring on and you are done. Oh...you'll want to screw the hose in before doing any of this.

Next step is bleeding. You can do it by yourself and I find the jar/hose method works well. It takes a bit but you'll get pedal. Even if you don't get all the air out the system will "gravity bleed". Meaning since the system is pretty much vertical the remaining air bubbles will eventually make their way to the resevoir and out of the system.

I just did it today and it took about 45 minutes to get enough pedal to get the car drivable. I then spent another 45 minutes driving around without any problems.

These instructions are for a 105/115 but I would imagine they are pretty much the same for anything else.

Good luck!
 

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I just did mine. No problem with good pliers. But two things to note. The IAP snap rings were wider than those I had. this made it difficult to slide the cylinder in on the hose side. I had to spin the ring to a narrower part to get it to pass. Second, the edge of the flywheel cover was also interfering with the snap ring. I should have removed it, but ended up bending the metal edge that was interfering enough to get it by.
 

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The problem we had was that when trying to get the snap ring off, my snap ring pliers weren't holding onto the snap ring, they would start opening up the ring and then they would pop out. This was because the little pins that form the nose of the pliers had lost the little groove at the end that is supposed to get under the snap ring when you push them into the holes (worn out). This kept happening and I just couldn't get the snap ring to stay on the pliers when trying to pull the ring back onto the shoulder of the cylinder.

The trick we used to get the snap rings off (I ended up taking both off) was a two person job. This only works if you are discarding the old slave (not rebuilding it). One person spread the ring and the other person jammed a small (expendable) straight blade screwdriver into the gap where the ring has started to open. Then one person holds the screwdriver in place while the snap ring pliers are taken away. So now you have the ring spread a little with the screwdriver holding the gap open. Then you keep pushing the screwdriver into the gap while using slip joint pliers to rotate the slave cylinder. If you do this right the screwdriver will act like a wedge, pulling the ring up onto the shoulder on the slave as the cylinder is turned. Once you have about 1/4 to 1/3 of the ring then it will stay there without the screwdriver and you can use pliers to complete the removal.

Since I never rebuild slave cylinders this would be my standard method, at least until I see some snap ring pliers that I think work better.
 

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also after you remove it, clean the mounting really good, put in new slave( clean the snap rings too) snap rings.. then i like to put a light coat of paint on the whole area, slave the mount on the bellhousing.. this will keep the rust/ corrrosion down to a min.
 

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slave cylinder snap-rings

attached are a couple of drawings showing the snap-rings.

Upon assembly clean everything very well and lube with a little antisieze or something.

Also, most importantly when you install the new slave, make sure the bleed port is at the top of the cylinder (12 o'clock) so you can get the air out.
 

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Geez Jim. I think that snap on set of 5 pliers is now on my list. My pliers were good in their day (replaceable tips) but I didn't take very good care of them. These look like they would have made that job a lot easier!
 

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Snap-On snap ring pliers rock but they wear out, too. I would not use anything cheaper in quality though, unless you enjoy losing your religion.
 

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I had to remove the two clips with one hand only (laying on the ground) so I had to do it in a funny way... it took hours... :(
 

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It took me a week to get the darned thing out. Daily PB Blaster, pumbing pliers, a big hammer and a new set of clip ring pliers from Sears. There was a lot of rust bonding the cylinder and the rings to the housing. After over 30 years I guess it was time to replace it. I never would have thought to use wire ties, good one!

Good luck, its really not that hard but I have to admit I was using the hammer a little more towards the end.

Peter D
1980 Alfa Spider
 

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Mine was rusted solid in the housing. Ended up gutting the old part then heating up the housing with a propane torch and then using a bfh and punch, driving it out. I even used an air hammer at one point. Heating the housing was the way to go. I'll second the advice of cleaning the inside of the housing really really well and then spreading some anti-seize on the inside before you slide in the new slave.
 
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