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I am prepping for my first ground-up, bare-metal restoration….a 74 GTV. In doing so there are logistical issues that I am not quite sure how to deal with. Any input on below would be appreciated:

How best to get the shell to the body shop?
I am thinking of putting it on a rolling body cart (like pic below), strap it down, and then load it on the flatbed trailer. My plan would be for the body shop to paint it on the cart as well. Is all of this a reasonable idea? Bad idea? Better ideas?

Safest way to move a painted car?
Then when I get it back…are these carts good for moving around finished, painted cars? Or is there some better/safer way I should be thinking about?

I have read many rotisserie threads, but I don’t think that is what I need. My bodywork is done, so I don’t a need to rotate the car. I just need to get paint, transport back from the body shop and then start putting it back together without damaging the new paint.

Thanks.
 

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Cars minus wheels are a nightmare ... if possible I suggest leaving it on its wheels
Pete
 

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I built a cart for mine a few years back when commencing metal work. It has pretty much been on there ever since other than a few times I needed to get access to areas where the cart was in the way. Like you are thinking, we pulled it up onto a flatbed trailer when towing it for a final blasting a few months ago and it has remained on this cart during the body and paint work. Comes home next week, so one more crucial leg for the cart!! I understand PSK's idea of keeping the wheels on, but if you want to paint the full underside that approach will be a bit of a PITA in its own way.
 

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I've built a few "carts" over the years and a rotisserie for my restoration and yes, if I bloody well hurried up and finished my restoration it might not have been such an issue, but yeah moving cars without wheels are a pain.

I've noticed watching TV restoration shows that many times they keep the wheels on as long as possible, and sure when they have finished the bodywork they chuck jacks underneath and remove the suspension, prepare for paint and then paint and rebuild the suspension (or swap out for already rebuilt components) and all done. Of course often they are restoring American cars that have a separate chassis and can roll in a brand new one when ready.

A rotisserie on wheels, that can be raised up and down, is the ultimate ... a really good example: https://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1963-1977/170260-1968-1750-gtv-race-car-build-2.html#post919054


Anyway the best advice I think is to ask your body shop what they want. A body cart that means the shell is very low, might really be a large pain in their backside, etc.
Pete
 

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I constructed a dolly for about $150. At the time, the castors I used were as much as the wood. The weight of the car is enough to keep it on the dolly so that it can be moved around.
Agree. Wood is strong enough - these shells don't weigh that much. So as osso says, you can save some $$ by building your own dolly. But the one pictured in the first post looks like it would certainly work OK. A little google searching tells me that JEGS sells that one for $300 - shipping would add some bucks to the total bill.

I did attach my dolly to the body. Bolts at the front suspension and rear trailing arm pick-up points. I had the body + shell loaded on a flatbed hauler for the trips to the media blaster, bodyshop and upholsterer, and was worried it would bounce off if not attached. Of course, the flatbed driver tied to the shell, not to the dolly, so maybe that isn't a concern.

Bearings in the dolly's casters won't fare well during media blasting. Don't know how to get around this.

Here are some shots of my Sprint riding on its dolly. Wish I had better photos of its construction.
 

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I made a metal cart high enough that I could work alongside and under. The four posts were located at the spring pockets. When the body shop came to get it they just strapped it all down, no problem at all. No problem either to roll it around, but this was only going to be on very smooth, very level concrete.

If I were to do it again I would want to put it on a rotisserie just to make the underside more accessible for undercoating. Other than that I am very happy with the way this worked.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for all these replies. For some reason I just got a "reply notice" email from the BB for the first time yesterday, so thought there had been no traction on this thread. Quite the contrary!

So my situation is:
  • Received the car with wheels/diff off
  • Already media blasted & epoxy primed
  • All the "hard" body prep is done. Down to skim coating. So I don't need to do a lot work low down on the body at this point.
Given this my main objective is to make sure the body shop can get under the car enough to spray it properly. I had been thinking rotisserie (mainly because you always hear "rotisserie bare metal restoration"), but it seems I can achieve my objective with a cart, which seems much easier than going the rotisserie route. And I can build a cart! Never would've thought of that before seeing the wood ones. I don't have a welder, so wood is a better bet for me. I like the idea of attaching the body at the suspension points as well.

@Osso...on your cart, does the body rest on the jack points?

@Alfajay...was yours high enough to spray underneath?

Thanks!
 

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Here is the cart we use. 2x4 frame with 4x4 uprights. You can make the height whatever you need (add gussets). Gives you good access to the rockers. When we transport, we run straps thru the jack points. I prefer this to using the suspension points because we routinely install the suspension on the cart.

cart.jpg



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Discussion Starter #11
@grpocket - I like this approach a lot. Couple questions:

1) when you strap thru the jackpoints for flatbed transport, I assume that is for strapping the body to the cart (vs to the truck)? And then once on flatbed, strapping cart+body to the truck?

2) on the 4x4 stud, do you have it grooved/routed at the top so that jackpoints can sink into the stud to avoid the potential of the body slipping off the top of the stud? Or not really necessary?

Thanks!
 

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@grpocket - I like this approach a lot. Couple questions:

1) when you strap thru the jackpoints for flatbed transport, I assume that is for strapping the body to the cart (vs to the truck)? And then once on flatbed, strapping cart+body to the truck?

2) on the 4x4 stud, do you have it grooved/routed at the top so that jackpoints can sink into the stud to avoid the potential of the body slipping off the top of the stud? Or not really necessary?

Thanks!
1) Yes.

2) We don't but I would recommend it. We've never had a problem but the potential certainly exists...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Cool - this has been really insightful. Thanks for all the replies and sharing of experience.

Think I have a plan. Assuming I go forward with the project, I'll post a pic of the cart I build.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Another item I was interested to get folks experience on:

For body gap fitment--doors, hood, boot lid--does it make any difference if the cart is built to have the body resting on the jack points vs. the suspension points?

I would think that suspension points would be better since that would represent real-world body flex. But maybe that is just splitting hairs?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just closing out this thread. 3 body shops I talked to all made a point that they wanted the cart to attach to the suspension mounts to ensure good and true door gap fitment. They aren't Alfa specialists, but they said that was best safe practice for a unibody car.

On another thread here on BB I got input that it doesn't really matter for a GTV...that if the sills are in good shape the body won't flex much differently whether the cart mounts on the jack points or the suspension mounts.

FWIW.
 
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