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Benvenuto Andy! That was my Dad's name. We would enjoy seeing some photos of your "new" GTV. Tell us about your work and progress on the car, too. Ciao...
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
It's a model with the 2.0 liter engine (with Dellorto carburetors), the hood mounted is the one used on the GTV 6, but I also have in the garage its original hood of the GTV 2.0. It has electric windows and air conditioning (air conditioning doesn't work for now but it's the original from Alfa Romeo, and I guess it needs to be upgraded with modern gas). The body was completely repainted in 2011 and is in very good condition even now.
For now, my work in progress is really basic: changed the brake pads of the front and rear wheels (and also break pump and break hoses), changed the piston of the rear trunk (the original was insufficient to open the trunk). Soon I'm going to buy new tires as well as new wheel bolts.
The engine runs very regular and smooth, with its awesome and unique sound. A classic for Alfa cars of that time!
The only thing I'm not sure about is that when the car is stopped in the garage (with the engine off) and after a day or more I open the garage door, I smell gasoline. Not sure if this is somehow standard because it's a carburetor car or my car needs a check and rebuild of the carburetors. I don't see any gas leaks when looking at the gas lines and on the floor under the car.

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That interior color I really like! It looks well preserved, too. The gas odor may be coming from the system of hoses and charcoal can that was designed to trap those fumes, and send them back into the intake manifold. I am assuming the same type of system and function that our north American market cars had at that time. Do you notice pressure inside the gas tank when you stop to re-fuel and remove the cap?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That interior color I really like! It looks well preserved, too. The gas odor may be coming from the system of hoses and charcoal can that was designed to trap those fumes, and send them back into the intake manifold. I am assuming the same type of system and function that our north American market cars had at that time. Do you notice pressure inside the gas tank when you stop to re-fuel and remove the cap?
Yes, the interiors are very well preserved. It was very difficult to find such a well -preserved car and this fabric is impossible to find in Italy too. As far as I know, nobody is reconstructing that kind of fabric.
I re fueled the car only once (since I bought it just a month ago) maybe I didn't pay much attention but I didn't notice any pressure when I removed the fuel cap.
 

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Well, gas evaporates fairly quickly, but the odor will persist afterward. You may have a small leak (especially if some of the fuel hoses are original), and you may not see it immediately. Look for a drip of gas after you've driven the car.
 

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Yes, the interiors are very well preserved. It was very difficult to find such a well -preserved car and this fabric is impossible to find in Italy too. As far as I know, nobody is reconstructing that kind of fabric.
I re fueled the car only once (since I bought it just a month ago) maybe I didn't pay much attention but I didn't notice any pressure when I removed the fuel cap.
That is a very nice looking GTV. The black velour fabric is available new, but to my knowledge, the tan is NLA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, gas evaporates fairly quickly, but the odor will persist afterward. You may have a small leak (especially if some of the fuel hoses are original), and you may not see it immediately. Look for a drip of gas after you've driven the car.
Fuel hoses have been replaced one month ago, and yesterday my mechanic checked the car and said carburetors need to be reconditioned especially membranes. He also suggests to clean up and replace old carburetors parts. The are no leakage of gasoline or spots underneath the engine on the ground after stopping the car for a while with the engine hot or cold.
My car also has air conditioning (the original kit mounted by Alfa Romeo) but it doesn't work (it is free of refrigerant gas and that gas is no more available), and my mechanic by removing the belt connected to the compressor broke the belt tensioner pulley... I think it would have broken anyway sooner or later because I see other crack signs on it therefore that part was too worn.
Now the problem is: where do I get another tensioner pulley for my car? is it worth to restore the original air conditioning kit (by modifying some parts to use modern refrigerant gas), or is it better to use modern compressors and parts and "modify" the air conditioning system? Is there anyone in the forum with any experience on this?
 

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Honestly, I don't think I would waste time or money on that old compressor. The new rotary piston compressors are so much more efficient, absorb less horsepower and are much more compact in size.
If you do a search here on the BB on air conditioning or compressors you'll find a lot of discussion and projects. I think I recall a certain compressor from a Honda Civic that works well on the Alfa 4 cylinder. Mounting brackets are also available from aftermarket suppliers. You probably have a large bracket mounted to the front of the motor, you should keep that because that is the part that will allow you to install the new style compressor bracket on the driver side.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Honestly, I don't think I would waste time or money on that old compressor. The new rotary piston compressors are so much more efficient, absorb less horsepower and are much more compact in size.
If you do a search here on the BB on air conditioning or compressors you'll find a lot of discussion and projects. I think I recall a certain compressor from a Honda Civic that works well on the Alfa 4 cylinder. Mounting brackets are also available from aftermarket suppliers. You probably have a large bracket mounted to the front of the motor, you should keep that because that is the part that will allow you to install the new style compressor bracket on the driver side.
Thanks alfaloco I'll follow your suggestion. Yes, I have a large metal bracket mounted to the front of the motor which holds the compressor. I only removed the belt and the pulley since the latter it's broken.
Will do an extensive search here in the forum :D
 

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Really beautiful, well I have a gtv6 in the same color. I prefer the original hood.

If the AC system is in as good shape, I would try to repair as-is before scrapping. My current gtv6 with the same old-style York compressor sat for 20 years and when revived the mechanical shop was able to replace hoses, seals and oil in the compressor, dryer and r134 refrigerant, and it blows very, very cold. Amazingly cold.

I suggest a separate wanted posting for the broken pulley and see if anybody has that part. Alfa Parts Exchange might be able to help you. I would think that might be easier to find in the UK or Europe. I will look on my gtv6 and see if there is a similar part. Don’t know if it is the same as older US Alfetta’s that had AC. Other option is to just take that part to a machine shop and have one fabricated, shouldn’t be that hard.

If reviving the York compressor doesn’t work or you just don’t want to try and possibly fail then yes, go for a Sanden rotary compressor (there are brackets to adapt to your York bracket), a larger condenser, a set of powerful SPAL radiator fans, new hoses and receiver dryer. The expansion valve and of course a clean evaporater and functioning heater valve is critical, and some are not good, I believe fouled expansion valves are common in revived AC units that don’t blow cold air, as well as poor air flow through the condenser. I would suggest that you run a cooler thermostat and have a clean radiator to keep down heat transfer to the condenser. Finally make sure that all hot air leaks through the firewall, handbrake, door panels and shifter are eliminated. Don’t park in the sun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Really beautiful, well I have a gtv6 in the same color. I prefer the original hood.

If the AC system is in as good shape, I would try to repair as-is before scrapping. My current gtv6 with the same old-style York compressor sat for 20 years and when revived the mechanical shop was able to replace hoses, seals and oil in the compressor, dryer and r134 refrigerant, and it blows very, very cold. Amazingly cold.

I suggest a separate wanted posting for the broken pulley and see if anybody has that part. Alfa Parts Exchange might be able to help you. I would think that might be easier to find in the UK or Europe. I will look on my gtv6 and see if there is a similar part. Don’t know if it is the same as older US Alfetta’s that had AC. Other option is to just take that part to a machine shop and have one fabricated, shouldn’t be that hard.

If reviving the York compressor doesn’t work or you just don’t want to try and possibly fail then yes, go for a Sanden rotary compressor (there are brackets to adapt to your York bracket), a larger condenser, a set of powerful SPAL radiator fans, new hoses and receiver dryer. The expansion valve and of course a clean evaporater and functioning heater valve is critical, and some are not good, I believe fouled expansion valves are common in revived AC units that don’t blow cold air, as well as poor air flow through the condenser. I would suggest that you run a cooler thermostat and have a clean radiator to keep down heat transfer to the condenser. Finally make sure that all hot air leaks through the firewall, handbrake, door panels and shifter are eliminated. Don’t park in the sun.
Thanks Peter for the valuable suggestions! I have also the original hood but need to be repainted and since I'm spending some money to change bushings and other parts of the front suspensions, changing the hood is not on my priority list at the moment. I would stick with the original York compressor, just to keep the car with its original AC system.
Good to know it can work fine with r134:)
 

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Thanks Peter for the valuable suggestions! I have also the original hood but need to be repainted and since I'm spending some money to change bushings and other parts of the front suspensions, changing the hood is not on my priority list at the moment. I would stick with the original York compressor, just to keep the car with its original AC system.
Good to know it can work fine with r134:)
Yup, no rush on changing a hood.

The York can work, but AC is one of those things where all the parts really need to be in excellent shape on a 1980s Alfa so your results may vary. I was really surprised that my car blows so cold. I have had later gtv6 with the US dual evap tropic air and a Sanden compressor using r134 (but not a larger condenser) that did not blow as cold. If you look at the many AC threads, it seems a larger parallel flow condenser is almost always recommended. I had an Alfetta and another gtv6 where the AC worked but those used R12 and both cars were less than five years old when I acquired them.

The passive parts, eliminating hot air leaks, putting heat insulation under the floor if the carpet is out, and roof if the headliner is ever out, rear louvers or some of the new heat and UV reflecting window tints, a top notch engine cooling system. I have an original radiator but it is recored with slightly larger tubing, and my original dual fans still work well. I have a 3.0 engine the

Don’t park in the sun! Once the entire car gets hot, an original system does not have the ability to cool the car down. If you are in the sun, crack all the windows and use a windshield shade. You will save your dash as well and many cars here in the US have warped tach and speedo needles from high interior heat. Likely you know this already, it is hot in Italy. I live in New Jersey with high summer temp and humidity. AC required during the daytime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yup, no rush on changing a hood.

The York can work, but AC is one of those things where all the parts really need to be in excellent shape on a 1980s Alfa so your results may vary. I was really surprised that my car blows so cold. I have had later gtv6 with the US dual evap tropic air and a Sanden compressor using r134 (but not a larger condenser) that did not blow as cold. If you look at the many AC threads, it seems a larger parallel flow condenser is almost always recommended. I had an Alfetta and another gtv6 where the AC worked but those used R12 and both cars were less than five years old when I acquired them.

The passive parts, eliminating hot air leaks, putting heat insulation under the floor if the carpet is out, and roof if the headliner is ever out, rear louvers or some of the new heat and UV reflecting window tints, a top notch engine cooling system. I have an original radiator but it is recored with slightly larger tubing, and my original dual fans still work well. I have a 3.0 engine the

Don’t park in the sun! Once the entire car gets hot, an original system does not have the ability to cool the car down. If you are in the sun, crack all the windows and use a windshield shade. You will save your dash as well and many cars here in the US have warped tach and speedo needles from high interior heat. Likely you know this already, it is hot in Italy. I live in New Jersey with high summer temp and humidity. AC required during the daytime.
Yes, I know those cars have such common problems with cracks in the dashboard due to the hot summer sunlight and speedometer problems. In Italy during the summer it is very hot with high humidity, and at the moment the car is in the workshop (protected from the sun) for the replacement of some silent blocks and bushings, and a general overhaul / tuning of the carburetors. So I will focus on rebuilding the AC probably next year.
 

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Yes, I know those cars have such common problems with cracks in the dashboard due to the hot summer sunlight and speedometer problems. In Italy during the summer it is very hot with high humidity, and at the moment the car is in the workshop (protected from the sun) for the replacement of some silent blocks and bushings, and a general overhaul / tuning of the carburetors. So I will focus on rebuilding the AC probably next year.
Too bad the wing vent windows as found on the Alfetta were eliminated on the GTV/GTV6. Good for both summer and winter driving.
 
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