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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I may have an opportunity to buy this ‘59 sprint but I’m not really familiar with their value, especially in such a rough condition like this, so I’m hoping some of you might have some advice on what a fair price would be. The pictures aren’t great but essentially it’s been sitting outside in Colorado for a while and the entire body seems to be covered in surface rust. The engine bay seems to be pretty solid and the underside still has its undercoating so it’s difficult to tell the rust situation down there.
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Is only the bare shell available? If so, even if it is free, getting all the missing bits and trim will be a money pit the size of the National Debt.

Pity, it looks not bad. Probably an aborted project with a sad story.
 

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You may want to read through this recent thread: Can this Alfa be saved? Perhaps you and that thread's originator, Ethan2369, can form a support group. :D

yvesmontreal said:
Is only the bare shell available? If so, even if it is free, getting all the missing bits and trim will be a money pit the size of the National Debt.
Yup, that was my thought too, but Yves types faster than I do. Without knowing how complete the car is, suggesting a value would be impossible. But as yvesmontreal says, if it isn't mostly complete, then its value is negative except to someone with a complete Sprint that has a rusted shell and needs a body transplant.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Is only the bare shell available? If so, even if it is free, getting all the missing bits and trim will be a money pit the size of the National Debt.

Pity, it looks not bad. Probably an aborted project with a sad story.
supposedly the owner has all the parts but we all know how that usually goes. He also claims to have a 1.3 and 1.6 engine.

I should have stated it earlier but my plan is to build sort of a “hot rod” Alfa so it’s not something I’d be trying to restore back to original condition.
 

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Great refreshing idea. Be good bones for an electric conversion. Be radical, go outside the box. A classic body shape , high kw motor,s, you may even get Greta wanting a ride. Quite honestly, I think this type of conversion will be the 21st century,s future hot rod scene.
What ever may power it, well done if you pursue it.
 

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Noticing that the hood and doors do not have the same (or any) level of ferric oxide the rest of the car has, have they been painted to protect them? Or is this another “deal of a lifetime” lightweight Sprint waiting to be discovered? That would change the story, now wouldn’t it? 🤔
 

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Yep. Find the chassis number stamped into the firewall. If there is an “E” stamped in the middle of a series of numbers, buy the car for whatever small amount is being asked, including the 1300, engine. Plus, hopefully all the other parts.

Then, and only then, post the number and announcement of your purchase here.
 
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You can see the left rear fender is still painted silver over red. No aluminum here.
 

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No ridge in the boot floor so sorry not a Veloce and certainly not a Lightweight as it has wind-up windows.
 

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I wouldn't hesitate on this Sprint. Grab it fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great refreshing idea. Be good bones for an electric conversion. Be radical, go outside the box. A classic body shape , high kw motor,s, you may even get Greta wanting a ride. Quite honestly, I think this type of conversion will be the 21st century,s future hot rod scene.
What ever may power it, well done if you pursue it.
the plan is to rebuild the entire body in aluminum then do a 2L/5-speed swap. Make it an “ultra-alleggerita” hot rod 😁
 

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Spiders are much easier to restore than Sprints because there is so much more available for them in terms of repro parts, plus the USA was the main market for Spiders so there are lots of them which means that bits can still be found.

Sprints much less so, the hard part with Sprints is that the bodyshell was almost constantly evolving so panel fit from one car to another is not easy when trying to find spare hoods, doors or trunk lids. Seats are not available and the aluminium trim around the doors & windows is nearly impossible to find second hand and if you are fortunate to find the alloy trim parts, shipping long bits of alloy trim becomes your next problem.

Rear screens are becoming scarce, the front ones can still be found & some companies are making repro screens. Door glass is flat, so easy to make, the internal window mechanisms are very specific to Sprints as they have framless glass so have a robust carrier & slides inside the doors.

The shell actually looks quite good from what can be seen, but yes the lower 6" is where the work usually needs to be done, that said the trunk floor looks quite good, I see doors with handles & what looks like some trim, windscreen trim, one side grille, a door sill cover, heater box etc in the rear of the car. the dashboard is unbutchered which is a big plus - all Sprints & Spiders have the same size instruments, so you can fir the early Giulietta ones or the later Giulia ones, a mix & match would see you with the 4 knobs on the dash, you don't need the fast idle screw, so you could fit a second on-off switch to operate a nice set of spotlights. The 3 beavertail switches on the left of the dash are getting hard to find, but you could fit 3 neat chrome toggles there, the steering column & shroud are there & the steering wheel looks pretty good, the indicator switch is there, e-brake & the wiring harness.....

This would be a very hard resto back to original, but a relatively straightforward Outlaw restomod - in Colorado you would want a big engine for the altitute, so 1750 or 2 liter with 5 speed - modify a 105 rear axle to take the Giulietta spring perches & reaction triangle tapered pin fitting, this gives you disc brakes, so 1600 105 discs can be made to fit the front, you can tuck a booster in there somewhere. 15" wheels with 165 tyres or if you are feeling spendy a set of the new 175/70's at Longstone in the UK

Like Gordon, I believe they all should be saved, but some are simply not economically viable to restore to original - that's when a resto-mod / Outlaw can make sense, especially if you can do a lot of the work yourself

Ciao
Greig
6 Sprints
3 Spiders
1 Ti
 

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the plan is to rebuild the entire body in aluminum
In that case, pricing the donor car becomes simple: it really doesn't matter what you pay for it - the cost of the donor will be a minor part of the overall project.

I'm not trying to be a wise guy here, but since you are planning a large-scale project, both in terms of time and money, selecting an appropriate donor will be far more important than saving a few bucks on it. If you are going to replace the body panels with aluminum then you are retaining the steel frame, sills, floors and other structural components. Most of these cars' structure is in that "lower 6 inches" that AlfistiSA refers to. So a lot will depend on how much rust damage this car's underside has. Judging from the condition of the trunk floor, it looks pretty good. But otherwise, the pictures tell us nothing; grass obscures the exterior shots, while the doors cover the interior.
 
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the plan is to rebuild the entire body in aluminum then do a 2L/5-speed swap. Make it an “ultra-alleggerita” hot rod 😁
You'd be better off time wise & wallet wise to mimic the original 750 Lightweights & retain the steel structure & just do the closures in aluminium, you could also retain the early car looks with the early grilles - here's a '59 that was sold by Fantasy Junction a few years ago - Outlaw'ed to look like an earlier 750 with the nose & tail mods. This one also has a 2.0 engine & 5 speed

You wouldn't be the first to do it, here's a link to another 1959 Sprint Veloce Alleggerita?

Ciao
Greig
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Spiders are much easier to restore than Sprints because there is so much more available for them in terms of repro parts, plus the USA was the main market for Spiders so there are lots of them which means that bits can still be found.

Sprints much less so, the hard part with Sprints is that the bodyshell was almost constantly evolving so panel fit from one car to another is not easy when trying to find spare hoods, doors or trunk lids. Seats are not available and the aluminium trim around the doors & windows is nearly impossible to find second hand and if you are fortunate to find the alloy trim parts, shipping long bits of alloy trim becomes your next problem.

Rear screens are becoming scarce, the front ones can still be found & some companies are making repro screens. Door glass is flat, so easy to make, the internal window mechanisms are very specific to Sprints as they have framless glass so have a robust carrier & slides inside the doors.

The shell actually looks quite good from what can be seen, but yes the lower 6" is where the work usually needs to be done, that said the trunk floor looks quite good, I see doors with handles & what looks like some trim, windscreen trim, one side grille, a door sill cover, heater box etc in the rear of the car. the dashboard is unbutchered which is a big plus - all Sprints & Spiders have the same size instruments, so you can fir the early Giulietta ones or the later Giulia ones, a mix & match would see you with the 4 knobs on the dash, you don't need the fast idle screw, so you could fit a second on-off switch to operate a nice set of spotlights. The 3 beavertail switches on the left of the dash are getting hard to find, but you could fit 3 neat chrome toggles there, the steering column & shroud are there & the steering wheel looks pretty good, the indicator switch is there, e-brake & the wiring harness.....

This would be a very hard resto back to original, but a relatively straightforward Outlaw restomod - in Colorado you would want a big engine for the altitute, so 1750 or 2 liter with 5 speed - modify a 105 rear axle to take the Giulietta spring perches & reaction triangle tapered pin fitting, this gives you disc brakes, so 1600 105 discs can be made to fit the front, you can tuck a booster in there somewhere. 15" wheels with 165 tyres or if you are feeling spendy a set of the new 175/70's at Longstone in the UK

Like Gordon, I believe they all should be saved, but some are simply not economically viable to restore to original - that's when a resto-mod / Outlaw can make sense, especially if you can do a lot of the work yourself

Ciao
Greig
6 Sprints
3 Spiders
1 Ti
Thank you so much for taking the time to write out such detailed answer!

I should probably have been clearer in my very first post on this car...I’m specifically looking for a sprint that’s in the $5k range because, 1) that’s all I can really afford right now, 2) because I want something that I can outlaw without feeling guilty about modifying a restorable candidate.
The thing is I don’t really know the market for these cars, especially when they’re in rough shape like this one is, that’s why I was hoping to get an idea what the value might be for something like this.
I do sheet metal fabrication for a living and I’ve always loved the look of the sprint so I thought it’d be fun to get one in a sorry state and do a full aluminum conversion, just for fun.
 

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this almost looks too good to cut the panels off and throw them away, it would be a shame. it reminds me of the saying, car arrived in boxes, just not enough boxes.
 
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If "the owner has all the parts", as he says, including all the glass, trim, and correctly numbered engine, $5K might be a bit of a lowball but hopefully not an insult. If he doesn't have certain critical items (like the back glass) then $5K would be too much, IMHO.

Have a look at some of the "completed auctions" on this bringatrailor page for some idea of the perceived value of Sprint projects and basket cases.

 

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At the other end of the price spectrum, Beverly Hills Car Club has a couple of "project" Giulietta Sprints. They're asking $25K for each. See: 1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint | Beverly Hills Car Club

The BHCC cars have the benefit of being assembled, so it's easier to see which parts are there and which are missing. Of course, I have no idea how their corrosion damage and missing/damaged parts compare with the Colorado car. While $25K is probably high, $5K seems low if the Colorado car really has just surface rust and if it's reasonably complete.

Bill S said:
Have a look at some of the "completed auctions" on this bringatrailor page
Hmm - I don't think of BaT as a platform for project cars, though there are a few on the page Bill references. This one seems about the cheapest/roughest and it sold for $10,500:
1958 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint 750B Project Of course, crazy things can happen in auctions.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
At the other end of the price spectrum, Beverly Hills Car Club has a couple of "project" Giulietta Sprints. They're asking $25K for each. See: 1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint | Beverly Hills Car Club

The BHCC cars have the benefit of being assembled, so it's easier to see which parts are there and which are missing. Of course, I have no idea how their corrosion damage and missing/damaged parts compare with the Colorado car. While $25K is probably high, $5K seems low if the Colorado car really has just surface rust and if it's reasonably complete.



Hmm - I don't think of BaT as a platform for project cars, though there are a few on the page Bill references. This one seems about the cheapest/roughest and it sold for $10,500:
1958 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint 750B Project Of course, crazy things can happen in auctions.
I appreciate the input Bill and Jay. I did check BaT a little bit before I posted, as well as BHCC, but it seemed like the pricing for the project cars was still kind of hard to nail down. There were some that brought a lot of bids that looked to be in real rough shape where others that looked more manageable didn’t bring much.
I’m not too familiar with the 750/101 series though, so I figured there were maybe model differences or something that I was just ignorant of.
 

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..... but it seemed like the pricing for the project cars was still kind of hard to nail down. There were some that brought a lot of bids that looked to be in real rough shape where others that looked more manageable didn’t bring much.
I think that's just the way it is. The market for project cars is nowhere near as as efficient as the market for well-restored cars. When valuing restored cars, you can refer to Hagerty's valuation tool, the Sports Car Market database and other resources. But the market for projects is less well-developed, probably because it's harder to compare "apples-to-apples". E.g., is a compete but rusted car worth more or less than an incomplete but sound one? Depends a lot on the buyer's resources.

I’m not too familiar with the 750/101 series though
You might enjoy the book "Illustrated Alfa Romeo Buyers Guide" by Joe Benson

 
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