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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I am trying to write a tyre pressure chart for the Alfa Giulia and its driving me bonkers. I have a variety of fitment guides that name all the different models slightly differently, so it makes it very difficult to tie them together.

Believing that Wikipedia is written by people in the know, i got a list of the various different models and years off the site. I then attempted to define a tyre pressure for them from my various fitment guides, which has proven to be impossible, to get something that is accurate. I can't even define exactly weather each model fitted 14" or 15" wheels.

this pressure guide is not going to get involved with different sizes, that is another story that i think we have all had fun arguaing about in the past. I would like to get the pressures right and i don't really beleive what i have come up with so far. In principal if a car goes from a 155 section tyre to a 165 section tyre, in theory the tyre pressure should be lower, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Please can you let me have any data as to what Alfa said for the individual models, any pictures of owners manuals or any other original pictures backing up tyre pressures would be greatfully accepeted, then i will put it all together so people can make up their own minds from the data we colate.

thank you


Giulia 1600 TI
from 1962 to 1967​
155HR15​
24psi front 26psi rear​
Giulia 1600 TI Super
from 1963 to 1964​
155HR15​
24psi front 26psi rear​
Giulia 1300
from 1964 to 1971​
155HR15​
from 1964 to 1971​
Giulia Super
from 1965 to 1972​
155HR15<1969> 165HR14
15” 23 & 24 – 14” 25 & 26​
Giulia 1300 ti
from 1966 to 1972​
155HR15<1969> 165HR14
15” 23 & 24 – 14” 25 & 26​
Giulia 1300 Super
from 1970 to 1972​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
Giulia 1600 S
from 1968 to 1970​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
Giulia Super 1.3
from 1972 to 1974​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
Giulia Super 1.6
from 1972 to 1974​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
Giulia Nuova Super 1.3
from 1974 to 1977​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
Giulia Nuova Super 1.6
from 1974 to 1977​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
Giulia Nuova Super Diesel
from 1976 to 1977​
165HR14
25psi front & 26psi rear​
 

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The big issue is that the original fitment tires used on these cars have changed over the years. The original guides in the owners manuals may not be valid pressures with current tires if the same size made of modern materials by different manufacturers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm, I'm not sure about that. I think the carcass structures of proper period tyres (ie the Cinturato and Michelin), are not built with the same materials as t'olden days, they are just better. The carcass is built to give the same characteristics. However using greener chemicals, better quality control than was used in the 1960s and improved modern compounds giving a bit more grip and wet behaviour than they had back then. So the same pressure as was used in certain enviroments back in the 1960s will give the same handling characteristics and balance as they did in the day, but you are better off in the wet.

Yes if you use a modern tyre carcass design then you are at sea there can be no guidance, but they will never handle as well anyway.

What i would say, is that today we should be using the higher pressures recomended in the 1960s, because of the speeds we are now doing. In t'old days you would rarely be able to maintain 70mph for very long at all because of all the junctions etc. However these days it is not at all unusual to sit at over 50 mph for over half an hour, with all our modern fangled motorways etc. a bit more tyre pressure is what is needed. back in th'olden days you would generally get 2 (or more) tyre pressures. one for normal use and one for fully loaded 7 High speed. yes there were motorways back then, and even Autobahns pre war, but they were unusual it was extraordinary for people to use them, and if they knew they were going to then they were supposed to increase their pressure to the high speed pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Aaaannnd there’s different pressures for different tyre brands to consider...
View attachment 1655519
Ah I'm back in the office now trying to tie stuff together, and even with this epic fitment guide it is still tricky so:

  • Giulia 1300 & Giulia TI . the Giulia 1300 is fine. I think they were 15" wheels throughout. However we have to assume that when t hey say Giulia TI they mean the 1300TI version as Wikipedia call it. i think that model ran from 66 to 1972. I think by 1972 they were fitting 14" wheels? i think a 165R14 should run at a lower pressure than a 155R15 on the same car?
  • Giulia TI Super. i'm assuming that this is the one that Wikipedia call the Giulia TI Super 63 - 64 only fits the Cinturato because the XAS hadn't been invented yet and it was the sports model.
  • Giulia Spint GT - Well Wikipedia didn't even know there was such a car.
  • Giulia Spider - baffling, because that is a car that i'm hoping to buy soon when someone buys my Lotus Elite, However not in the list from Wikipedia. And on top of that i pretty sure the early cars were 155R15 and the later ones 165R14. Again i would expect a slightly lower pressure in the 14" wheel.
  • What is the Giulia Nuova Super 1.3, 1.6 & Deisel

It is a complete mine feild, i can't make head nor tail of it. i think that the Wikipedia list i have found and used is based on the engines, and this list you have posted (Which seems like the most legiable i have come accross) is based on the body styles.

can some one at least help me define what should be a true hones and full list of models. and years they were made from, i hope i can the qualify at least to within a year what wheel they were fitting and take it from there. (mabe).

By the way Ranz what book is that out of. I want one.
 

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The info came from an Intereurope service manual, a UK publication, adapted from original German, according to page 1. No indication of official Alfa source, but heck, you wouldn’t dream that lot up all by yourself.
Here’s a better image for anybody who wants to use it. I‘ll also post separately to aid later searchers, since the topic seems to raise its head regularly.
And yes, this manual is easily the most comprehensive of the three I have. Leaves the Haynes one for dead.
701BA5B9-44A2-4163-BF5D-D18ED9E599E9.jpeg 6F5618A7-7110-4827-A9C7-C1A1B340D4B0.jpeg
 
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