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Discussion Starter #1
I was just reading about the Shankle Heel & Toe kit on the Weber Carb Conversion thread and, while my 75 Spider is also a Weber conversion, it is perfectly set up for modified heel and toe downshifts: you place the ball of your foot on the brake pedal and blip the throttle with the right side of your foot. Just wondering if this is also the case with the original Spica fuel injection ( or for that matter, subsequent versions with Bosch EFI )?
 

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On a Spica car, the throttle pedal is over an inch closer to the driver than the brake pedal. It made heel and toe a challenge. The Shankle kit raised the anchor point of the cable at the firewall to charge the leverage of the throttle lever, reduce the stroke and lower the pedal. It is not a very elegant installation. I've achieved similar results by disposing of the throttle stopper screwed to the floor underneath the pedal, unlocking the cable, depressing the pedal to the floor, and adjusting the cable to get full throttle with the pedal on the floor. Then you need to install a longer stop screw for the idle position.

Most of the cars on which I performed this trick started with a pedal adjustment that could not reach full throttle. Easy horsepower.
 

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Using this technique is only allowed if you have an SCCA
Lic. issued before 1970. It must not be used going to the local Walmart
or Costco..
 

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I've done something similar to improve the heel-and-toeability of a Weber car. Adjusted the long plastic rod that goes from the lever at the firewall to the bellcrank to its shortest extreme, and lowered the throttle stopper under the gas pedal as much as possible (required trimming the threaded stud and removing the lock nut). The gas pedal is now almost at the same plane as the brake pedal when the latter is fully depressed. A nice improvement for downshifting, and also reduces the chances of hitting gas and brake at the same time with my size 12 when I don't mean to.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great ideas! I’ll have to take the cover off mine to check what was done, but when depressed, the brake pedal is perfectly level with the accelerator pedal. Good thing too, as heel & toe downshifts not only make for smoother transitions into corners, but saves wear and tear on the notoriously weak second gear synchros (thanks Porsche!) in these cars. It also sounds and feels very cool!
 

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Was just starting to look into how to get the throttle further back in my '81. My knee is jammed into the back of the wheel if I am close enough to depress the clutch all the way (well, that's as far back as the seat goes as well...)
 

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I just replaced the entire throttle pedal to make heel-toe better (my brake and clutch pedals are totally non-stock but they were replaced for different reasons). The core problem is that the angle on the throttle pedal is too horizontal- it needs to be angled downwards more to allow heel toe. In stock form, the pedal was far too high to reach under heavy braking.



I used aluminum angle to create a bracket that attaches to the stock throttle pedal arm with the two bolts used for the original. The aluminum angle has a radiused slot so I can adjust the angle of the pedal by loosening the bolts if desired. The OMP pedal was ~$25. I earlier had made my own pedal out of aluminum angle, but this one is nicer than what I could make. I could go back to the stock pedal easily if I wanted- just bolt in the old one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Precisely - which is what the Shankle kit accomplished. Makes it easy to brake with the ball of your foot and blip the throttle with the right side of the foot. No contortions required and there is actually a benefit in having large feet!
 
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