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Seeking two non-rusted heater hose nipples for a 60s 105 intake manifold. These screw into the rear of the manifold near the bleed screw. Thanks much ...
 

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I think this is the nipple being referred to? Someone ought to produce a run of these from brass hex stock, as they're relatively simple to do and everyone needs one.
 

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Guys, don't use brass on aluminum! The metals don't like each other when they get wet. A lot of galvanic reaction!
 

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I would have old ones CAD plated but, taking them off old manifolds is almost impossible without damaging the manifold. The 750/101 Normale intake manifolds use the same fitting as the 101 Veloce or 105 1600 manifolds.
 

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I make both the hex base and slotted screw in type of stainless steel. Not inexpensive, but will last forever. Need them to look cad plated? Media glass bead takes care of that.
1621473
 

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Gordon, I think that you parts look great and would CAD plate them before installing them. I have the original steel connectors but, all of them need to be CAD plated and it is difficult to plate anything until the lockdown is over.
 

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Is this set cad plated?
1621611

The Weber top screws are, but these are SS, media blasted. Looks identical, but maintains this look.
Never electrolytically bonds with the aluminum, never corrodes.
 

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The originals are CAD plated and there is corrosion between the steel threads and the aluminum manifold. The red rust which Fe3O2 is larger than the original steel and this is why it is difficult to remove it from the manifold. I always use distilled water and antifreeze when I purchase a new Alfa and the amount of corrision is minimal compared to an engine that was filled with tap water and antifreeze. I am a retired chemist/metallurgist and did failure analysis for many decades. I saw many failures due to corrosion and the problem with steel if wants to oxidize to either red rust or black rust which are much more stable than steel.
 

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If memory serves me correctly, I picked up my 105 intake from David King about four years ago. As seen in the two photos, both nipples are the slotted screw types. I thought I would remove them, but could not get them to budge and certainly did not want them to be destroyed in the process.

Gordon's are the only ones I have seen for sale, and I imagine they would outlive me, by decades. However, his caveat that they are, "Not inexpensive" gives me reason to believe that they would cost more than the intake did:oops:
IMG_4503.JPG
 

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I had a number of intake manifolds and never wanted to remove a damaged fitting unless it was leaking. I would send the manifold to a machine shop that knows how to remove the damaged fitting. I just media blast the manifold and attach the heater hoses and agree that you can easily damage the manifold.
 

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The way I get dead ones out it a combination of heat and a light impact pneumatic hammer wrench.
First you drive in a fairly tight fitting bolt so it extends through the fitting into the manifold. Then ideally gas weld the fitting to the bolt. I then shock it with cold water, and try my hammer impact to unscrew. Sometimes it's pretty easy, other times more heat and chill cycles are needed. Eventually they will come out. You could also EDM them out but I use brutality rather than modern tech.
The last ones I removed were brazed to the fitting.
1621635
 

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I like your different removal techniques and believe that the last intake manifold, carbs and cold air box I sold for $500.00. I do not remember selling an individual manifold.
 

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John,

Sound advice.

I have no idea if they will leak or not.

After reading Gordon's last post in this thread, I will try to "clean" up the ends just a bit before I attach the heater hoses. On that subject, is there a particular brand or type of hose I should buy?

Ray
 

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I mean, they're not original, but I got the complete silicone cooling hose kit from Classic Alfa and they're pretty sweet.
 

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Ray,

I just use good quality water hose that is made a US hose company like Gates. I have many Giulietta manifolds and removing the hose fittings is much easier than the ones on you car. I have seen some heater fittings that had holes in them but, was still able to attach the heater hose. I like Gordon's stainless steel fittings and would have replaced the one with a hole but, that was many years ago. I remember buying a damaged 1967 Deutto for $300 and removed the engine and transmission and sold the rest for a few dollars.

John W.
 

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John, et al,

The silicone cooling hose kit Gubi mentioned would have been nice, but CA doesn't offer one for the 750-101 cars. I'll check on Gates hose as I'm sure it's readily available.
 

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I restore cars and use regular hoses instead of converting everything to aircraft high pressure lines that are used in racing cars. I did use the braided stainless steel to replace the original composite rubber lines for safety reasons. I like the original look and these cars will probably used for weekend cars and not for daily drivers.
 
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