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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As a Paris sold car my 68' came with yellow headlights. Not yellow bulbs but true yellow lenses. In an effort to keep the car as original as possible I'm hoping to keep these lights and install a set of clear carello driving lights to pass Massachusetts regulations requiring at least two forward facing white lights. I'll see how that goes this summer.

The lights were in tough shape. The reflector silver was shot and the housing well rusted. I opted to save the lenses and install them in new housings I ordered from CA. Removing the sealant didn't seem possible so I sawed the hosing in half from the back then chipped off the sealant from the lenses. There were some chips and a piece I had to re-glue but the lenses were saved.

The new units used white silicone. Removing the clear lenses was very difficult and I found no way to do it without cracking them.

Once out the silicone was easy to remove with a small wire brush in my dremmel. The new lenses were then re-installed with the same silicone and set aside to cure. Very happy with the results. Job Done!
 

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Thanks for posting this. Your mention of your car being a '68 1750 answers an important question about headlights. We can now say that the slotted-fin mounting start with the 1968 1750 GTVs. 1600 GTVs (my first GTV was a December '67 build) and, other 105s we can presume, used the US SAE standard 3 nub mountings that all US sealed beam headlight cars used. For anyone with a car from this period be sure and check which kind of headlight mounting you have before you order headlights from European or American vendors.

The slotted-fin headlights won't fit cars SAE 3 nub headlights while a 3-nub SAE style headlight will will be very loose fit in the Euro style headlight buckets.

The problem most of us face with non SAE style headlights is that finding oem replacements is very difficult and expensive while many of the aftermarket replacements lack the original's quality.

The reflectors on my 72 Super are weathered but the "cursive" Carello lenses are good so I've been thinking about doing the same job you just finished. Do you mind telling us where you purchased your reflective housings? I've searched and never found any. I'm a little disappointed in the difficulty you had in separating the lenses from the housing. I was hoping you could just cut through the sealant and remove the lenses. When you mentioned using silicon to attach the lens to the new reflector did you use regular RTV or something else?

Again, thanks again for posting this. You've just solved a problem owners of old Alfas around the world will face at one time or another.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The old white sealant was tough stuff. It had no give and was rigid like plaster. I spent a bit of time trying to drill it out but can realize a futile task pretty fast on these old cars now.
For the silicone I used 3M Marine Grade Silicone Sealant – White – 08027. I experimented with a Butyl Rubber sealant but it was difficult to work with and not the same material the new units so I thought it better to match them. The color was also white vs. black.

The new lights as you see them came from Classic Alfa.
 

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Sorry to open this old thread! Im in the same process. Did you try heating them with a heat gun or putting them on an oven?


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Discussion Starter #7
I never tried heat. The original sealant was very brittle. I didn't think it could soften with heat but perhaps. The old buckets were well past so I opted to cut them up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
the lenses you wanted to save or the new donors? I hope the later.

I tried prying things out on mine but there is just too much stress concentrated in a single area. My donor lenses didn't seem special so I just broke them and cleaned up the housing. For the old lenses I cut the housing off and carfully pulled it away from the lenses. Yellow lenses are like hens teeth now. France stopped using them when they joined the EU
 
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