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I saw this company on another post when I was looking at there site they say they fix AAV. I thought they are unrepairable
Fuel injection corporations fuelinjectioncorp.com
I have a manual AAV but I would like to fix the automatic one
 

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I have never heard of them, but always interested in finding new trustworthy sources for our old beasts. Our '85 spider has a weak AAV, I was considering on converting to a manual, is this not working in your application?
 

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Eric,

We have two of the valves, neither is working. yesterday we attempted to disassemble, easier said than done.

Is the warmup period un manageable if the AAV is left out completely?
 

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If you remove the AAV you will need to block off the hose to/from the AAV - otherwise the idle speed will be very high.

I have a functioning AAV in our Spider. Cold idle is 1200-1400 rpm then it settles down to 900 rpm after a few minutes. I put a manual AAV in our GTV6 (has the same type of AAV originally). I think there is info about the manual AAV in the Spider FAQ thread. You just have to remember that the manual AAV is self-closing - you have to close it yourself...
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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If you block off the hose you're going to have hard cold starting and poor cold idle.

They're available new at the link above for $73. As long as they're available I'd just buy a new one and clean it out once in a while.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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And incidentally, did you try cleaning out the two you have with some carb cleaner? That often helps: they're not very complex inside.

I've got an ultrasonic cleaner that I bet would free up most of the "bad" ones out there. Haven't had a chance to try it yet, though.
 

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I've got an ultrasonic cleaner that I bet would free up most of the "bad" ones out there. Haven't had a chance to try it yet, though.
That's an interesting idea. But my peek inside an AAV makes me think the bi-metal strip loses its ability to bend (respond to temp changes) and thus move the vane.
 

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s/b Bosch 0280140140

The Bosch #0280140123 crosses over to Airtex 2H1530. I bought mine at Rock Auto a couple of years ago. It has the Bosch name and part number on it, Airtex is manufacturing for Bosch.

AIRTEX / WELLS Part # 2H1530

Franco
Not sure how much of a functional difference there is between the 0280140123 and the 0280140140 model AAV's, but I think the correct stock number for the Bosch AAV on series 3 spiders is 0280140140. Lots of them look the same, but each different Bosch part number is designed to be used with a different car - some fuel injected, some carbuereted, some 4 cylinder, some 6 cylinder, etc. You can try a new AAV with a non-Spider stock part number but your idle may be too high or too low at cold or operating temperature. In other words, if you don't use the 0280140140 its a crap shoot whether it will do what you want it to do.
 

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Not sure how much of a functional difference there is between the 0280140123 and the 0280140140 model AAV's, but I think the correct stock number for the Bosch AAV on series 3 spiders is 0280140140. Lots of them look the same, but each different Bosch part number is designed to be used with a different car - some fuel injected, some carbuereted, some 4 cylinder, some 6 cylinder, etc. You can try a new AAV with a non-Spider stock part number but your idle may be too high or too low at cold or operating temperature. In other words, if you don't use the 0280140140 its a crap shoot whether it will do what you want it to do.

Out of curiosity, do you or anyone have any idea what the difference is between the valves? Would it be the bi-metallic strip? Or the range of motion of the vane? The time the coil takes to heat up? They have the same mechanical basis, so what varies between model numbers? If we knew what was different, perhaps there could be a way to compensate for this variance.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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I think the main difference is the size and shape of the cutout in the moving blade.

It's honestly not really a high-precision part. As long as it closes fully when warm I bet most of them will work fine when cold if you're willing to accept a little idle variation during warmup. There's also a little adjustability there via loosening the nut and adjusting the opening size.
 

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In addition to the Bosch 0280140166 that came on my 1888 Spider, I have purchased 5 used Bosch 0280140140 AAV's.

I have cleaned a few (repeatedly filled with carb cleaner and shaken) and I have tested all 6 of them, more than once. The wiper plates move inside all of them, when heated and cooled. They just never seal off ALL the air (when properly warmed and with closed plates).

I imagine an AAV that was totally clogged, and had frozen wiper plates, could/would seal off all the air, but I doubt if a properly functioning unit (with a moving wiper plate) has the ability to totally seal off the air passageways.

I just can't fathom how the "wiper plate" design can create a real tight seal, since the heat strip does not have enough strength to turn one disc if it is held tightly against the other.

None of the AAV's I have create a totally air-tight seal when completely warmed (12V applied, or oven at 150F for 2 hours) and supposedly in the "closed" position. Some amount of air can still be forced through the air tubes when the device is very warm and the wiper plate "looks" closed.

I'm using the best one I have (that lets the least amount of air through when hot) but even that one still lets a little bit of air through.

Perhaps I'm just batting 6-for-6 on used AAV's, but If I could locate a new 0280140140 unit, I would love to buy and test it to prove or disprove my theory.

I just can't see how a heat strip would have enough torque to turn a wiper plate if it has any friction at all (which it would need to have in order to create a tight seal).
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Well, it doesn't have to be completely airtight. The AAV bypasses the throttle plate, same as the idle adjustment bypass.

At hot idle, the total air is whatever goes through the closed AAV plus whatever goes through the idle o-ring. As long as you can use the idle o-ring to bring the idle down to spec, the AAV is "closed enough", so to speak.
 

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I ordered a new one today from RockAuto for $75.00. It should be here in a few days, with a little luck it will work better that what we had.
 

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I can assure you that the Bosch 0280140125 works fine. At the time I purchased it from Rock Auto it was listed as fitting a 1982 Alfa Romeo Spider. It is dimensionally the same as a a 0280140140 and according to specifications the heater closes the bypass fully in 8 minutes, which testing confirmed. It's not rocket science, it's the fast idle setting for these cars, buts it's not.

Instead of me summarizing the AAV operation from the source I use (see below) I suggest that all owners with Bosch fuel injection buy the book. The theory and operation is explained extremely well with lots of detail on all Jetronic fuel injection systems, divided into pulsed and continuous injection theory and operation.

Its the bible for Bosch L-jet which should be you're one and only guide to understand, service, trouble shoot, and modify Bosch Fuel injection. Include the Alfa Romeo Workshop Manual with it and you'll have no problem diagnosing and fixing most problems.

The most important item that every one of these 30 plus year old cars need is replacement of every piece of rubber, especially vacumn and fuel lines. Once you've established a base line for you're car by doing so the biggest problem of false air will eliminate a lot of problems, fuel flow and return will be verifiable and can be confirmed and eliminated, and finally you're cooling system will not fail unexpectedly. I'm talking about rubber hoses and connections only.

"Bosch Fuel Injection and Engine Management", Charles O Probst, Bentley Publishers, ISBN 0-8376-0300-5.

Also "Gasoline Fuel-Injection System L-Jetronic", Edition 95/96, Technical Instruction, by BOSCH. It has a bright yellow cover page with a drawing of a AFM on it.

Read, read, read, and when your done read it again. It's the most technically accurate compilation of how you're Alfa L-jet works and why. Unfortunately there is only brief information on the operation of the ECU and how it works.

By the way I paid $104 Canadian for my AAV at the time.

If you need any help or want to have a discussion, PM me and I'll give you my phone number, it re-enforces my knowledge and understanding so I'm happy to do it.

Thanks
Franco
 

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The most important item that every one of these 30 plus year old cars need is replacement of every piece of rubber, especially vacumn and fuel lines. Once you've established a base line for you're car by doing so the biggest problem of false air will eliminate a lot of problems, fuel flow and return will be verifiable and can be confirmed and eliminated, and finally you're cooling system will not fail unexpectedly. I'm talking about rubber hoses and connections only.
This is so true. Every time I replaced some old hoses, my car ran slightly better. I only have a few left. It runs great once I figured out all those places with false air.
 
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