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yes!....the handbrake (parking brake) shoes are inside the rear of the disc!
so remove the 2 screws on the disc/drum element then tap the front centre hub part (in other words, where the 4 studs are sticking out at you) to dislodge any rust etc (do NOT hammer on the shiny disc itself or from behind!), and pull off the unit........the pads are behind that...........

EDIT (ooops!) handbrake off obviously........;)....if the axle does not turn freely, then you might have to loosen the handbrake adjuster through the hole in the hub to slacken it to get the disc/drum off.....I would also put both rear wheels on jack stands when doing this job.
 

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Wht are we in here?? Are the shoes worn down all of the way? Can you get a clear picture of the thickness of each shoe, top and bottom, both sides??

Don't breathe the dust!!!!! Wipe with a wet cloth to clean. Try to make no dust.
 

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the bottom shoe looks non existant and the top very thin from the photo!

As for getting them off, the manual has very simplified instructions:(: it just says to press and rotate the 2 bayonet pins (accessed thru those 2 big holes in the hub), which loosens the pads - then it says to "retrieve them together with the reaction spring and expansion control spring"....not so sure it it that simple, people cuss at the strength of the springs, some even go to the lengths of pulling the half shaft!
But try it the way the manual says, a second pair of strong hands to assist might be a good idea....as far as I understand it, you have to pull both shoes (once they are loose by releasing those retainer pins) out over the hub by stretching those bu***r hard springs apart - as a unit.

Here is a photo from the manual showing you the parts of the rear handbrake assy, in case it is of help!

EDIT: why is your hub looking so crooked against the brake assembly? or is it an optical allusion?
 

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I did this a few months back. Its not that bad(really).Remove the bayonet screws(push and turn)-be careful not to break! Take a look at IAP's catalogue to get an idea of how they look like,it will give you an idea of how they install.

To remove, use a flat screwdriver to unhook the thinner spring. Once that is out, you can pull the unit out together(2 shoes, heavy spring). To reinstall, do the reverse. Slip the 2 shoes connected to the heavy spring, a bit of a balancing act, but very do-able.Hold in place with 1 hand and install the bayonete screws. Attach the smaller spring to 1 shoe, and use a screwdriver to connect to the other shoe.
Thats pretty much it- it may take a few attempts, but it worked for me...
I did this twice,once to replace the shoes, and a second time to change the brake cables.
 

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Use a 5mm T handle Allen wrench to loosen the bayonet pins. You access them thru the holes in the flange.

Snake a thin wire thru the bottom loop of the thin forward spring. Wrap it around a screw driver or grab it with pliers and pull down to get the loop out of the slot.

Edit: I forgot to mention that the bayonet pins get pushed in and turned 90 degrees to remove them or install them.
 

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I believe this was done not too long ago, but now i notice that the hand break pops back up after i press the button and push it down. Any relation to the work or is this a new issue?
 

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How far does the handle pop up? Is it just an inch or so? If so under the rubber boot there are 2 bolts on either side of the handle that you can tighten.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks everyone for the help. After a few Italian curse words my father taught me, I finally got the right side hand brake shoes off.

The left rear rotor was more than a pita to remove. It was actually a pitFa to remove. Borrowed a wheel/gear puller from a neighbor - PB Blaster tap, PB Blaster Tap etc. When it finally came loose sounded like a cannon firing. Stupid me was sitting in front of it. I swear my navel hit my backbone.

Small other problem. There are deep groves where the hand brake pads push against the interior of the rotor. Must the rotors be replace or is it OK to ignore it?

If I do replace the rotors does anyone have any experience with purchasing them from the dreaded E-Bay suppliers? If I get the drilled and slotted rotors they are less than half the price of the usual suppliers. I know the is a lot of
opinions on the positives and negatives of drilled and slot rotors but they look cool.

Thanks again.:D
 

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if you have deep grooves, then yes change them now that you have them off! - personally I would just go for the original type non drilled rotors, cool or not (you dont even see them!)
If you do not replace them the groves in the disc will just cause grooves in the pads and then the pads will not "float". Replace as a pair, in fact if the pads have already been grooved, replace them together with the discs.
 

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Deep grooves are bad. That's why it was so hard to pull the rotor foo. Thise groove lock in and cab ne a Major piFa.

Save your $$ for some nice slotted and drilled discs at the front. The rear brakes only do about 30% of your stopping and are not worth the invesment. That's just my .002 cents.

Spend your greenbacks on some nice rotors from a reputable supplier for the front end.
 

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may you please send me the name of the service manual book you have mentioned in this section?
i'm looking for such a manual folder for my junior
 

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Parking brake shoe R&R

As often happens with Spider projects, "mission creep" should be anticipated and it was no different when after 125k, I began to experience odd noise (as opposed to all the normal noise) from the rear of my ride under braking.

A check of the left rear revealed a pad backing plate just beginning to contact the rotor and a sloppy mess of hardened diff fluid coating the parking brake shoes and mounting plates, none of which was apparent from a simple wheel removal. Since the only way that fluid could be exiting the diff is via the axel seals, it was time to add pulling the axels and R&R of both seals to what started as pad replacement.

Also, although the shoes were at 100% (and frankly, properly adjusted, why would they ever wear at all?) they were so sloppy with the aforementioned coating of caked on fluid, replacement was necessary.

Notice I skipped over removal of rear rotors (discussed elsewhere) and after considerable fiddling with the internal brake adjustment (via one of the two holes in the rotor hub) the disks came off and along with the front rotors, went to Oreiley's, where for $15/axel, they were resurfaced with plenty of metal left.

Others have described shoe removal as "not too bad", an observation with which I must strenuously disagree since, and unless you are possessed with the forearm strength of Popeye, combined with the patience of Job, R&R of the shoes, preceeded by a struggle with the two retaining springs, must count with one of the most frustrating and challenging jobs I have tackled on my Spider...and I have done head gaskets several times, as well as numerous bushings and mounts.

Where was I? Oh yeah, pulling the axels.

In hindsight, I recommend leaving the brake shoes alone till the axels are out, since they can then be addressed after mounting the axel in a vice, with good lighting and considerably improved access. Notice I have also skipped over caliper removal and disconnecting the parking brake cable at the diff, both straightforward exercises.

To pull the axels, I used a slap hammer, with the head fastener removed and reattached after putting the SH shaft through a hole in the axel hub. A few sharp blows and the axel released from the diff and came out easily.

The manual shows use of a screwdriver to pry out the seal but I found carefully drilling two holes on opposite sides of the seal and using a wood screw on the SH for removal. I did this on the car, though in a vice helps with access. Count on a dribble of diff fluid from the axel tubes after seal removal, although a later check of fluid level revealed not enough loss to merit top off.

EDIT: I lost more fluid from the diff than realized and endured a loud clunk from the rear for a while before I thought to check the level. I have since apologized to everyone who weighed in (on a separate post) while searching a solution.

Back to the brake shoes, since they are technically for parking only, and under even the best case scenario, would be of minimal use stopping the car, I would be reluctant to remove the shoes unless, like mine, they were essentially useless because of the diff fluid. I could write a book describing all the ways to not replace the shoes, and wish I could be of more assistance in that regard except to say connecting the heavier spring to the top shoe before assembly on the backing plate was helpful. And of course, do one at a time since reference to the assembled side is informative. There are so many wandering bits and pieces competing for their proper location on the backing plate, reassembly for me was a matter of trial, and many errors, before I was finished. Does that help? :)

A final thought. Before reassembly of the parking brake cable, be sure the cabin handle is all the way down, not one click up like mine was, which can add unnecessary frustration (as opposed to all the necessary frustration) inherent in the process. In retrospect, I convinced myself disassembly and cleaning of the cable attachments was productive. I believe that is called "rationalization".

A final, final thought, my Spider has long been victim of a soft pedal, in spite of a new MC, stainless brake lines, gallons of wasted DOT3, a new rear proportioning valve and risk to the relationship with my spouse of 49 years who could not quite master the "pump and hold" part of the bleeding process :). She is mechanically reclined...

Anyway, this time I'm going to do a "reverse bleed", using a hand pump to push fluid from the caliper bleed screws back to th MC.

Film at 11.

Happy New Year, all!
 

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Hate to break this to ya —\0 but if diff lube got past the seals, it got into the rear bearings. No bueno. If I were you ( and I was 6 months ago) I’d replace the rear wheel bearings while u are there. Serious.

Sorry bout that but it’s not a hard job really
 

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Not bearings too!

Hate to break this to ya —\0 but if diff lube got past the seals, it got into the rear bearings. No bueno. If I were you ( and I was 6 months ago) I’d replace the rear wheel bearings while u are there. Serious.

Sorry bout that but it’s not a hard job really
Thanks for the tip.

Both bearings were covered with what looked like rusty fluid but spun easily and quietly and being sealed, I was hoping for the best. Also quiet after reinstall.

R&R does not look simple and I'll keep an eye (ear?) on them.
 
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