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Hello friends,

I've onwned a handful of Alfas, basically just for the driving experience and when they were sold, I took the usual minor loss of investment to seek my next project. However it seems many classic alfas are now receiving a price jump, perhaps I have some thinking to do about the next project.

I'm wondering if the 1300 ti model Guilia is a desirable model for collectors. The car is a running driving car that will need cosmetics . I'm wondering if I want to address the needed cosmetics and electrical work and rehab the car in a really complete way.

Any ideas on if it's worth going this direction for the purpose of enjoyment and perhaps appreciation in value when the time comes?

Car is red, black interior, vintage mags, body clean but needing a respray. Motor and trans function well, basically a really neat little car.
 

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All Giulia sedans have a following, whether for collectors or users value them more, don't know. To me they are drivers' cars, not show pieces. Prices are not huge, 1300 and non-Super models bring the least. In the US, I'd expect a 1300 TI to bring in the high teens for a good one, half to two-thirds what a comparable 1600 Super will bring.

Andrew
 

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Thank you for be Intel. Good to know the project has some potential upside. If doing the required work makes the car drivable and increases some long term value, then I think it's a win win for me.
 

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In a word, no, IMO. As stated many times here in the Wanted Alive thread, there were over 560,000 made and in "collectible" terms none to few of the models (save the TI Super) will be truly "collectible" in the sense of a 2000 production run or exotic car. There are just too many. But all older cars seem to be escalating, as are older Alfas and as are Giulias, so there is some modest upsides. But in general the 1300's are on the bottom of the pack, all other things being equal. Twelve months ago I'd have said the low-to-mid-10's, then up a bit to mid-teens. Some US vendors have imported several and are trying to make a killing in the low 20's but this is not working so well.
 

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I got into Giulia sedans because I like how they look and drive. And when I got started with them (1977), they were cheap ($400), which allowed me a then-teen, to afford one.
Andrew
 

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There are some TI's that will always have some enhanced value to collectors that later model TI's (and Supers) probably won't acquire. In saying this, I'm referring to a car that will be seen as being worth more money than a pristine, original later model TI or Super. Those cars always command more money than cars of more indifferent quality, but they still won't bring collector-car money like a pristine stepnose GTV, for instance. As Bruce said, the problem with these cars is that they were made for a long time, were very popular in Y'urp (although not so much here in the States) and so, compared to other older Alfas, can still be found in respectable numbers on the various European cars lists.

In my opinion, an original, specimen quality, early ribbon speedo TI w/ floor shift (my preference) and the right color combination would be a good choice (The same goes for early Supers, too). These cars have a special charm that the later cars seem to lack and I think at auction that old-world cachet is exactly what motivates people to pay extra for what is, after all, a pretty mundane little car despite its very exotic mechanical specification. But I don't think I'd attempt a restoration beyond just getting it into good-driver condition. Here's why:

As for doing restoration on a TI, the best I can say about that is to always keep in mind that it's as expensive to restore a TI as it is to restore a GTV or Spider and the latter cars will always bring more money. That wouldn't stop me working on a car that I really like---but only if I liked it enough to keep for my own use. As has often been said, if you spend money restoring a car you should expect to be upside down in the car for an appreciable period of time before you can even think of recovering your resto costs in a sale.

Finally, I think cars make terrible investments. If you buy a nice Alfa or want to restore an Alfa to splendid condition, do so because you like the car and intend to keep an enjoy it.
 

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I would actually slightly defer to beg a slight difference re the values, though in principle still kind of agree and understand where such comments are coming from. Definitely I am in agreement re what Andrew says, you buy a classic Alfa to drive and enjoy. That actually to me is what owning and enjoying a classic Alfa or most other classics are about.

Investment values are a tenuous affair in regards to such cars like our Alfas, especially if you have to restore one.

Still having noted this and also talking of prices, not investment values, and noting of course that the US is a bit different from Australia, or the UK, or Europe, the one common theme I have noted over the past couple of years but especially the last 12 months is that good to really immaculate 105s (especially GTVs, Giulia sedans, as well as boat tail spiders, and to a lessor extent Berlinas) are on the upward rise price wise.

Does that mean therefore that a 1300 Ti is likely to be worth less than a comparable 1600 Super? Historically I probably would have said yes. However, in today's market place I am more inclined to say that the price differential is likely to be less. I have seen for instance a low milage, 2 or 3 owner 1300 Ti (1969 or '70 vintage) go for over $30k about a year or so ago. It sold very quickly. Similarly I have seen a number of Supers in the $20 - $40K level.

GTVs are heading upwards towards $60k out here now for the very best ones, irrespective of which model.
 

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I think that you also have to take into account the condition of the car. In 2006 I bought a Giulia 1300 (the basic 1966 model with 4-speed gearbox). It was in first paint, unwelded, first tires, excellent condition. Back then people told me that the price I paid was too high. Today I would easily get twice as much as I paid for it.

In comparison I spent 20k Euro on a 1300TI that was welded, repainted, engine repaired and all that that I sold years later for a third of what I paid.
 

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Values will differ by market and condition. The US never got 1300s, so they're all coming from somewhere else. 1300s are not big in the US, either for their small engines or their down-market cosmetics. I have never felt that way myself, but the market at large seems to.

In general, I'd say old cars on the road on the US tend to be in worse condition than in other countries because most states have no safety/condition inspection, and there is no federal-level inspection (like an MOT in the UK). So cars can remain legally licensed and insured in most states even if barely able to run, and in fact don't run at all. A pre-smog (1975 and older) dead rusty hulk can sit in your driveway in Calif, for instance, licensed and insured year after year, and no official will ever look at it or care about it. You can drive it down the street with no brakes or steering; there's no process to check.

The condition of cars coming to the US can of course vary. I've seen stunningly good and bad over time.

Andrew
 
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