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All -

There have been a lot of great postings in the BB about how to remove the front windshield/windscreen from a GTV6. I've not seen any with pictures, so I decided to create an illustrated guide.

First, to set the scene. My parts car 1984 GTV6 had a broken front windshield, and I was pretty sure that the gasket around it was bad also. However, I do want to remove the pristine rear glass and gasket, with the intent of installing it on my 1976 Alfetta GT. So I decided to practice on the front. The goal is to remove the windshield, and not break the glass any more than it is already, which would mean that I didn't apply any extra pressure (once the glass is cracked, it will crack again much more easily...). My approach is to use the "craft stick" approach that has been described previously. When the glass does come out, i'll evaluate the gasket to see if it's worth keeping, but the glass is trash.

I had the following tools:
  • a putty knife, rounded at the corners to as to not cut the gasket
  • about five flat-blade screwdrivers, all "medium size"
  • a bag of "craft sticks" - these are larger than Popsicle sticks, both in length and width
Here's my steps, with pics along the way.

First, this is the inside and outside of the windshield. The dash is out, and the A-pillar trim is removed (watch out for the three hiding screws so you don't rip the trim!) You can't see them, but there are considerable window cracks in the top corner of the driver's side.
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1. I started with the putty knife, running the blade all the way around the gasket on the "car side", not the glass side. Both inside and outside. I did this to break any seal or stickiness that might have been there. Just need to make sure the putty knife slides all the way in and gently run it around. If you are concerned about the finish of the car (I wasn't) use a plastic knife or one of those nylon trim knives.
2. Using a screwdriver, I started inside the car, at the middle point of the top of the windshield. I started sliding the blade between the gasket and the headliner. Don't slide the blade between the gasket and the glass! The gasket is a one-piece unit that wraps around the headliner, the glass and the top of the car. If you SLOWLY work the screwdriver, you can get it around the headliner, and into the space between the steel roof and the glass. Basically, you slide the screwdriver in, and then pivot it 90 degrees to point straight up. Then pivot the blade past 90 degrees, and work the blade upward and backward so the blade goes over the steel roof. Continue working on it, and it will eventually slide all the way up past the glass and will appear on top of the car. I then took the putty knife and worked the top-side gasket away from the roof, exposing the blade of the screwdriver coming from the inside. I slid the first screwdriver in just far enough so that the blade rests on the steel roof.
3. I repeated the above step with four more screwdrivers, each one about 3 inches away from the previous. Now, I have five screwdrivers, all starting on the inside of the car, with the tip of the blade poking outside. This covered the distance from the center to just up to the first corner. I started working toward the corner that was broken, figuring that I'd know immediately (crack!) if I was exerting too much pressure.
4. Very gently, I started rocking the screwdrivers, which had the effect of opening up the space on the top-side of the roof more. No cracking, so I knew I was being careful enough. Eventually, I could look down from the outside of the car and see the space appearing. Then, I was able to take a stick, and slide it down from the outside in between two of the screwdrivers. I could have done this from the inside, sliding upward, but this seemed to be easier, as it pushed the gasket out of the way as it went all the way in. I did this between every two screwdrivers. Here's a pic of how this looks at this point. You can clearly see the cracks in the corner, but none of them were caused by my efforts here!
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5. At that point, I pulled the screwdrivers out (leaving the sticks in!), and repeated the same thing from the other side. Unfortunately, I discovered that the gasket was ripped on this side, and was splitting in half. So it was going to be useless. However, I kept to the plan, and worked the gasket as if it were still one piece. The process was becoming easy at this point, and I was actually able to easily insert the screwdriver from the inside, and slide the stick in from the outside.
6. There are four metal gasket holders (two on each side) about 1/3 and 2/3 down each side of the windshield. I had to drill out the rivets and remove the metal bracket. Not sure if there was another way - it didn't look like it to me.
7. Once I drilled those out, I continued to do the "two drivers/one stick" approach about half-way down one side. Here is a pic after I stopped on one side and moved to the other. Note the space along the top - the top-most sticks were starting to fall into the car at this point - no longer needed.
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8. I started down the other side, and suddenly it seemed like the entire windshield popped up, and all the sticks fell into the car! I was able to then grab the corner of the gasket/windshield (remember this is the side with the cracks in the corner) and start to lift it higher - no cracking occurred. The gasket along the bottom starts loosening up all by itself, due to the upward movement of the windshield. Here's a pic:
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9. At this point, I could have removed the windshield completely, if I had another person to help. Success! Total elapsed time about 90 minutes, and not one single 'unmentionable' word!

Here's what I learned:
  • Not as hard as I thought it would be
  • Patience, patience, patience! Especially in the careful insertion of the screwdrivers and the pivoting of the blade around the glass. It will work, but you need to take your time.
  • Five screwdrivers seems to be the right amount - this lets you work a fair bit of area before starting to insert the sticks. If you just use one stick at the start, it will break for sure. Using five screwdrivers allows you to insert 4-5 sticks, and they will be strong enough when you pull the blades out.
Hope this helped. I'll try to document the same steps pulling out the back glass. Interested to hear from the BB if there are any differences between front and back glass/gasket. I plan to put the GTV6 glass and gasket into the Alfetta hatch (no rust in the Alfetta vs rust on the GTV6 hatch), and I'm assuming that Alfa didn't change the basic dimensions of the hatch itself, although I know that the glass is different as is the attachment method. So, assuming I get the GTV6 gasket and glass out successfully, they will live again!
 

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You need to use THIN body filler aplicators. screwdrivers have a thin edge and a thick shoulder, the thicker shoulder if pushed against the glass will break the screen/sheild
 

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can someone guide me please, how do you edit posts. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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can someone guide me please, how do you edit posts.
There may be a 'bug' in the editing function but try clicking on the three vertical dots towards the right side at the top of the post you wish to edit.
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Thanks ghnl
I am still coming to grips with the new format.

The best way to remove a gasketed windshield is to cut the gasket with a box cutter. Those old gaskets tend to harden over time. That will make it a real challenge to re-install. You will run the risk of breaking the windshield.
I have to disaggree Alfetta and GTV6/4 window gaskets are of a very high quality and do not degrade as badly as other manufacturers gaskets of the same era. I agree if you want to garantee not to break the shield cut the gasket, but you don't have to if the original gasket is in good condition. If you use thin blade steel body filler aplicators and a little care you can remove and replace the same screen /shield any number of times

Cheers sportiva
 

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Steve, Thankyou so much for taking the time to do this. I have a 1975 Alfetta GT myself and I am very interested in the front and rear gaskets. Mine has had a GTV6 windscreen gasket added by the PO, but I do have the original one that takes the stainless inserts. One of the inserts has little holes in it that a plastic wind deflector fits into, and I am guessing the sole reason for this is to encourage air into the vents, since the early cars do do have those plastic air fins under the wipers. Keep up the great work. PS if/when you start on the '76 I'd be interested to see if the non-screwdriver method is any easier.
 

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