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Discussion Starter #1
I was renewing my Hagerty insurance and saw this while calculating my stated value for the car. The past couple of years the value for amazing cars has shot through the roof, which might logically mean once those cars are gone, the solid drivers might start to increase at a sharper rate, too. Maybe.

Are you all seeing more interest from collectors or even garden variety enthusiasts? Personally, whereas 10 years ago I'd have people maaaybe asking about my Datsun (!), now anytime I park the thing I get mobbed by jalopy geeks who are downright giddy for transaxle Alfas. The last Cars & Coffee I went to at Circuit of the Americas, while I was getting ready to leave, I got a cold cash offer of $7000! Nuts, right? I said no thanks. Even more nuts!
(I will never tell my wife that story, btw)
 

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I've noticed a definite correlation between the frequency with which a classic car is featured in various "Top 10" lists and its market value. Seems to be happening more and more with GTV-6. That said, the values are still a bit "soft". Decent ones can still be found for $6-8K. But just wait until Petrolicious does a feature on a GTV-6, or one of the more popular Youtube "project car" channels - then you won't be able to find a runner for under $10K !
.... one can dream, right? :smile2:
 

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There was a slight bump a few years ago when Petrolicious and some other site (I forget which) actually had an article or two on the GTV6. I think they are undervalued, too, especially being rarer than the popular 105 chassis GTV's. But about 10 or so years ago, the 105's were cheap compared to now.

That being said, it's almost impossible for me to drive my '6 without someone honking at me giving me a thumbs up, pedestrians staring or even taking pictures, or even getting caught up in random conversations on the street. I'm lucky enough to have a car that's probably between a level 1 and level 2 car, so I reckon that helps. I think more awareness of Alfa Romeo as a brand in the USA (with the new car sales and adverts) can only help us with the classic models.
 

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An upcoming episode of The Grand Tour will feature a GTV6, and Clarkson whining about his GTV6 because he failed to perform any sort of essential maintenance, and finally said GTV6 breaking. Should be epic.
Our cars will see a $500-1,000 bump the day after it "airs."
 

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Though there's only one sale above $20K on BaT over the last couple years, I've heard from people privately who have either bought or sold very nice ones for over $20K. My bank was willing to finance my '81 for $14.5K when I took a clear title to them.
 

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An upcoming episode of The Grand Tour will feature a GTV6, and Clarkson whining about his GTV6 because he failed to perform any sort of essential maintenance, and finally said GTV6 breaking. Should be epic.
Our cars will see a $500-1,000 bump the day after it "airs."
I like Clarkson but it's things like this that make me angry. If he had maintained and/or repaired the car (if it needed anything) correctly, it wouldn't have broken down. That's all there is to it. These things that perpetuate the idea that Alfa's are unreliable need to stop. Of course, how reliable can any 30+ year old car be?
 

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It almost makes me want to not watch the show. Hundreds of thousands (if not millions) watched Top Gear and now The Grand Tour. Imagine if on that show he could say: "Contrary to what you might think, the GTV6 was magnificent!" The car would skyrocket in popularity. Or, if they staged the breakdown, then they should admit to it and say that the car was so reliable they had to do it for comedic purposes.
 

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Didn't Top Gear get successfully sued by Musk for staging the breakdown of a Tesla? Anyway, re the GTV6, that really bugs me. Maybe they will say in the show that it was faked. Apparently, Clarkson admitted as much on social media.
 

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When I take my 84 to a cars and coffee at least one person tells me that it is the coolest thing there. When I was at a track day earlier this year a guy with a 'Vette told me that I had the best sounding car there. I think that there is a growing awareness of our cars.
 

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The GTV6 in Australia is fetching bigger prices now but we have seen these bubble before. The issue for me is that those who buy these cars for an "investment" don't drive or maintain them. They just keep them in the shed/garage. This creates a scarcity but also means that when they finally sell them on the cars have all the issues not being used. It reduces the pool of knowledge, repairers and aftermarket providers of parts. On the other hand the inflated values take some of the sting out of the costs of keeping and driving old, exotic cars. The truth is that the GTV6 is in any many ways one of the most exotic cars ever produced. The engine is a wet sleeved, OHC, high compression, high revving. The engine speed drive line is rare, while the transaxle under the floor has been used on about 10 cars in the past 60 years (if that). The suspension is equally rare and if it had Webers it would be even more exotic. I've been considering an Espada. It is far less exotic than my GTV6... the only way it exceeds the Alfa is that it has 12 cylinders...
 

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There's an '86 Maratona clone on Hemmings for $37,500; for sale for some time. And we don't know the reserve price of the other red clone for sale on ebay. Hagerty has a #1 condition car at $25,200, which is about $5K higher than when I bought my Maratona two years ago; its currently insured with Hagerty for $30K. I'd say prices are definitely climbing, and its about time because GTV-6s are just sublime—that Busso V6, old school racing suspension, and Giugiaro styling. And rising values are good for all GTV-6s...
 

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I had heard in the distant past that Clarkson was quizzed on which car he owned that he most regretted selling. His answer was a GTV6, even tho he had some complaints on it not being completely maintenance-free. Again, probably more his fault for not staying ahead of small fixes, than the car's. Over the last 30+ years, Ive never had one strand me on the roadside.

When folks stop to comment on my GTV6, it's usually based around the styling as that's all they can see from the sidewalk. I explain that it's an ALFA... but if you flip it upside down it's not far from an exotic. My budget does not allow for Ferraris, Lambos, or Maseratis. But for the price, new and used, I can afford a 'poor man's Ferrari'. Sweet front-mounted V6, rear-mounted transaxle, inboard disc brakes, deDion suspension, Brembos up front, etc, are not expected on a car that sold in the $15-17K range when new. And the Giugiaro styling doesn't hurt either.

Peter
 

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VaiVeloce - then I'll have to do the same. I might actually be under insured, considering all I put into the car to get it just right...
 

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I have a few other cars insured with Leyland West, they're a bit tougher on agreed value. Hagerty costs a bit more, but its worth it given you don't have to prove (i.e. appraisal) your car's value.
 

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I hate to be a buzzkill, but be careful what you wish for!

To the owners of any type of car, a potential increase in value seems like a good thing, especially to those who might sell the car for "the right price." To those of us who vow to keep said car forever, and increase in value is somewhat less practical, except to justify the inordinate amount of time and money spent on the car! It also means that if the worst happens, your insurance company might pay out the proper amount (or not!).

Now for the cautionary tale (which may not be 100% applicable to the GTV6, but hear me out): I have worked at an independent Porsche/BMW repair shop for almost 14 years. In this span, I have seen the meteoric rise in the value of Porsche 356 and 911 models (not that either have ever been cheap). Besides ensuring that I will never be able to afford one of these cars (even though I can rebuild one myself), it really sucked a lot of the fun out the whole thing. Money does funny things to people. Instead of making rational decisions, they make repair decisions about their cars based upon "the market" or what some phantom future buyer might prefer. They become afraid to drive the car because it is worth too much.

Lower down the totem pole, the same thing has happened with the BMW 1600/2002. BMW made almost a million of these cars, and for a long time they were not worth much. This meant that it was a great buy for the DIY enthusiast, and eminently customizable without the worry of altering the precious originality of the car. Sadly, the same things I saw in the air-cooled 911 market began happening with the BMW '02, with lots of flippers and shysters coming out of the woodwork to join the feeding frenzy, driving out some honest enthusiasts in the process.

I bought a modified '73 2002tii in 2013, just as the values were starting to pick up. The car is probably worth twice what I paid for it, but I would still love the car if it were worth half of what I paid for it!

Another example of the above would be the BMW E30 M3: no further explanation needed!

Now, I am not claiming that such an extreme increase in value will happen to the GTV6, but it is food for thought. I doubt the GTV6 will ever get the "mainstream" enthusiast appeal of a 911 or BMW '02, and that is probably a good thing. It is a bit too quirky, and its (mostly undeserved) reputation for unreliability will keep the worst of the wannabes away. However, its engineering features and amazing engine definitely have a huge appeal to certain types of enthusiasts, and the newfound interest will probably mean that nice GTV6s will see an increase in value. However, a rising tide does not always lift all boats, so rusty deathtraps will likely not see an exponential increase in value----again, this is not a Porsche 356!

So, a nice bump in value will be a good thing for all of us who own a GTV6, and may help to spur some renewed interest in keeping these things alive and keeping parts in production. However, we don't want the bubble-driven feeding frenzy of the air-cooled Porsche market! Let the slick-haired rich old dudes find some other trendy collector car to take to the local cars and coffee . . . .

Chris
 

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Chris—Completely agree, especially your last paragraph. I just completed a four year glass out repaint of my 911SC, a car I've owned since graduating from college. My wife and I used it for beach weekends; when I decided to "restore" it I knew that it would be an emotional decision, and not necessarily a wise financial one. I didn't care... Well, between 2014 and now the air-cooled 911 market popped, and all of a sudden I went from being underwater to actually breaking even on the cost of the repaint. The SC used to be the entry-level 911; not anymore, even though values have leveled off in the last eighteen months.

I'm torn between having my GTV-6 rise in value, and keeping it a sleeper collector for those who really understand what a great car it is...
 
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