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Joe Elwell
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Discussion Starter #1
My 84 GTV6 has a lot of drive train lash, slop, whatever you call it. I assume you guys know what I mean? If not please reply.

I'm pulling the engine and transaxle next week, and I'll replace any wear item I can.

But in the meantime, what component commonly contributes the most to this slop?

1. Engine mounts
2. Driveshaft donuts (how come we don't call these 'Guibos'?)
3. Transaxle mounts
4. Gearbox Internal?
5. Halfshafts cv joints

Any recommendations for what I sure 100% be sure to replace, would be appreciated.

thx
Joe Elwell
Fairfax, VA
 

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Hi Joe-
Usually, it is a bad guibo that is causing excessive driveline lash, and this should be pretty obvious on inspection. I think a lot of us will have a very low threshold for replacing guibos if they look "suspicious."
If you are pulling the engine, then examining the front engine mounts will be easy. Don't forget to look at the rear engine mount.
The rear trans mounts can sometimes be more challenging to diagnose. The rubber portion of the rear trans mounts can come unstuck from their "U" shaped metal carrier, it might not be obvious they are bad until they are levered on some. This is why people will through-bolt that mount. Also check the interface between the mounts and the "ears" of the clutch assembly, the bolts can loosen/mount holes enlarge/crack. I find that when those mounts are bad or loose you get "clunking" on accel/decel. Obviously, the rear transaxle mount needs a look.
Check the CVs for play and eyeball their boots.
I wouldn't worry about the transaxle internals unless you find something particularly alarming on the drain plug magnet or in the fluid. Remember to make sure the fill plug will come out before you remove the drain plug, ha ha.
Hope that helps,
Al
 

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2. Driveshaft donuts (how come we don't call these 'Guibos'?)
Mostly because it's spelled Giubo, which is pronounced "JOO-boh". What you written there is "GWEE-boh". :)
 

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Joe Elwell
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Discussion Starter #4
Mostly because it's spelled Giubo, which is pronounced "JOO-boh". What you written there is "GWEE-boh". :)
Hi Joe-
Usually, it is a bad guibo that is causing excessive driveline lash, and this should be pretty obvious on inspection. I think a lot of us will have a very low threshold for replacing guibos if they look "suspicious."
If you are pulling the engine, then examining the front engine mounts will be easy. Don't forget to look at the rear engine mount.
The rear trans mounts can sometimes be more challenging to diagnose. The rubber portion of the rear trans mounts can come unstuck from their "U" shaped metal carrier, it might not be obvious they are bad until they are levered on some. This is why people will through-bolt that mount. Also check the interface between the mounts and the "ears" of the clutch assembly, the bolts can loosen/mount holes enlarge/crack. I find that when those mounts are bad or loose you get "clunking" on accel/decel. Obviously, the rear transaxle mount needs a look.
Check the CVs for play and eyeball their boots.
I wouldn't worry about the transaxle internals unless you find something particularly alarming on the drain plug magnet or in the fluid. Remember to make sure the fill plug will come out before you remove the drain plug, ha ha.
Hope that helps,
Al
Thanks Al - that's great information!
best,
Joe
 

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Really? The reason I wrote it that way is that GWEE-boh is the way I've always heard it pronounced around BMW folks.
Hi Joe,
What do you expect from people who think they have the "ultimate driving machine". :D
Seriously though, it's very often mispronounced (not just by Beemer folk), probably it get merged with the name Guido.
 

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I thought they called them "Gelenkscheibe," which is way easier to spell.
 

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I agree with Al/Reale above.

The only other thing that comes to mind is the clamping sleeve between the forward-most giubo and the driveshaft snout. This clamps onto the splines of the driveshaft, so if the bolt is loose you would get a clunk.

Also, are you pulling out the engine and trans for other reasons? I'd inspect the driveshaft, etc with everything in place before taking anything apart.
 

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Joe Elwell
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117 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Hi Joe,
What do you expect from people who think they have the "ultimate driving machine". :D
Seriously though, it's very often mispronounced (not just by Beemer folk), probably it get merged with the name Guido.
I agree with Al/Reale above.

The only other thing that comes to mind is the clamping sleeve between the forward-most giubo and the driveshaft snout. This clamps onto the splines of the driveshaft, so if the bolt is loose you would get a clunk.

Also, are you pulling out the engine and trans for other reasons? I'd inspect the driveshaft, etc with everything in place before taking anything apart.
Thanks for that info. I'll probably just replace engine mounts and giubos (!) and of course take care that clamping sleeve is tight, when reinstalling the engine.

I'm rebuilding a 3.0 from a Verde I found in a local pick-a-part - putting in cams, Megasquirt, headers, etc. Also putting in Milano power steering along with upgraded a/c and an improved (smaller) starter to clear the headers.

I've also got the transaxle from the Verde. I'll probably install the rebuilt engine/ps/ac first since that's all up front, then rebuild the Verde transaxle as the second big step.

I've heard from a few folks that I can mix/match gears from the current (84) transaxle and the Verde transaxle to get better ratios for the added power. Any thoughts on that from anyone?

Joe
 
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