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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We are pretty far along on this build but I will share our experience. The car started out as a '73 GTV that I bought about 8 years ago. It was a nice car with low miles but had been stored in a barn and had a fair amount of rust to the outer rockers, quarters, floor boards, A pillar, and rear fender well openings - pretty typical stuff.

Along the way I replaced the Wheels and tires:
Alfa 025.jpg

With Toyo 205s on Rota 15" wheels:
1973 GTV.jpg

Replaced the '73 grille with a '69:
'73 GTV Retro Grill.jpg

Replaced the interior with flying buttress seats:
DSC_0417.jpg

And replaced the rear seat with a shelf (in progress picture):
DSC_0628.jpg


I also had a number of motors in and out of the car over the years.
I used it as a summertime semi-daily driver for a number of years but realized that not addressing the rust issues was not doing it any good. At the same time, the value of GTVs had taken a serious hit and I couldn't justify spending the time or money to bring it back stock. So it sat for the last few years.

About a year and a half ago we were approached by an Alfisti on the west coast that was interested in doing a street GTAm build. At first I was hesitant since I've never done anything like that before but the more we talked the more it sounded doable. The project would be challenging but my (correct) impression was that the guy knew his stuff and knew what he wanted but was willing to listen to reason when things had to change. The overall objectives being:



  • GTAm widebody for the street that could be run on the track.
  • Fiberglass fenders (originally steel but we decided against that).
  • Small tailights, '69 GTV grille, '69 GTV dash (fiberglass).
  • Full roll cage with reasonable egress.
  • Comfortable cabin with carpet and passenger seats.
  • Air Conditioning (later deleted)
  • Twin Spark motor.
  • Tilton brakes
  • Panhard rear end.
  • Lots of other details.
It was a daunting task and I was happy when he was willing to include Mike Besic in on the project. He knows more than I ever will and is more than willing to offer his advise on any number of areas. No way could we have succeeded without Mike.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Rockers and quarters were toast on the outside but other than some surface rust the middle and inner rockers were in fine shape:
20130418_093436.jpg

Replaced the quarters and rockers:
2013-07-24 16.15.20 (640x360).jpg

Engine bay came out nice:
2013-05-15 10.05.48.jpg

The floors were touch and go but we finally decided to patch rather than replace:
20130515_100608 (640x480).jpg

A-pillar repair work:
2013073195134616.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Then it was off to Besic's to fit a roll cage and some other items.

All wrapped up for the trip west:
2013-12-03 12.21.02 (640x360).jpg

Mike's beautiful roll cage with easy egress for driver and passenger:
20140310_161843.jpg

A view of the rear cage:
20140310_161515.jpg

and a shot of the panhard and rear reinforcement:
IMAG0069 (640x362).jpg

And the modification for the Tilton MCs:
20140310_161852.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
We then got busy with opening up the rear fenders.

The before:
IMAG0110.jpg

during (using a plasma cutter):
IMAG0103.jpg


after:
IMAG0098.jpg





Now, before we went any further, we sandblasted the shell a second time and then re-primed in black epoxy (you can see we also closed up the '73 rear valance in order to fit the '69 taillights ):
IMAG0012 (640x362) (2).jpg

Because the rear has an inner fender we welded back in a strip to close off the area.
IMAG0168.jpg

This was very tricky as you are working with thin metals, butt welding on edge. A lot of spot welds and a lot of patience...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Then it was on to the front fender cut outs. In this case we elected to lay out the pattern and then cut it out with a cutoff wheel. We wanted clean cuts and round corners:

IMAG0212.jpg

IMAG0214.jpg

IMAG0219.jpg


Frankly it was sobering watching as we cut out most of the quarter panels that we so carefully welded in a few months earlier. I suppose no one will see the work but its how we wanted to do it...
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Then on to fitting the fiberglass fenders. This was the most frightening part of the build. These fenders are built with racing in mind but our goal was a street car so fit and finish was critical. We fussed over the fit for months. Everybody I talked to had issues with the fenders. Set them to the bodyline and the doors jams are off. Set the door jams and it doesn't fit around the headlights. And the rears were worse yet. Nothing made sense. At one point I was convinced that there was something wrong with the fiberglass fenders. I was also concerned with how flimsy they are are in the free state.

Fortunately the Alfa Nationals were in Detroit and I had a chance to pour over a GTAm at Waterford. With that I was able to finally figure out the correct position of the fenders. Shortly after that, bodyman Nate joined the team and made short work of it. In no time he had pre-drilled all the holes for the rivets. Once we were satisfied with the fit, we used 3M panel bond adhesive and Cleco clamps to glue the fiberglass panels to the fenders. Once that was completed it also gave me peace of mind that the panels were stiff enough to live on the streets.

IMAG0536.jpg

IMAG0543.jpg

IMAG0588.jpg

Then it was back to the booth to fare in the fenders (lot of work to make them pretty):

IMAG0600.jpg

IMAG0604.jpg

The hole on the top of the rear fender is where the filler cap goes. We are using a center mounted fuel cell so there is a bit of plumbing to get there but again, Mike Besic took care of that.



.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
And then on to the fun stuff.

First we applied epoxy primer to the undercarriage:
GTAm bottom in primer.jpg

Then applied SEM Bedliner tinted body color:
IMAG0647.jpg

Inside the cabin:
IMAG0661.jpg

And inside the trunk:
IMAG0659.jpg

Since we will have a side exhaust, we welded up the cutout on the rear valance:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
And the result of a lot of hard work:

IMAG0728.jpg

IMAG0727.jpg

IMAG0726.jpg

No time to admire the handiwork. We had to get going on dressing out the shell. First we threw enough suspension on it to get it off the dolly and rolling. The seats shown were the client's first choice but they turned out to be too big to fit properly. Also they were just out of scale with the rest of the car. More on that later:
IMAG0843.jpg

We rebuilt the steering box and idler arm and started to assemble the engine bay:
IMAG0845.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Many details:

Badges and Stainless trim:
IMAG1183.jpg

GTA Door handles:
IMAG1226.jpg

GTA License light bracket:
IMAG1228.jpg

With the interior, in addition to the bedliner, we apply a layer of dynamat type sheet:
IMAG1145.jpg

And then apply rubber paint over the top. Ultimately the cabin will have carpet and this helps to keep things from slipping. We have found that this combination does a great job of eliminating the tin can effect, reducing noise and heat:
IMAG1168.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
More details:

The stanchions for the rollcage are welded to the inner rocker. This presented a challenge for the stainless kick plate:
IMAG1182.jpg


But it came out well:
IMAG2382 (640x362).jpg


The turn signal lights are reproductions of the mini's from the 60s:
IMAG1582.jpg


We blacked out the inner grille:
IMAG1238.jpg


Finally decided on the stock GTV grille and mesh without the horizontal bars. Later we substituted amber inner lights:
IMAG2004.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The dash was an interesting project in itself. We chose to use a fiberglass unit from Classic Alfa. It is well made but requires a fair amount of work to be presentable. It also requires some internal bracing and brackets to be welded to the body attachment. You also loose the glove box:
IMAG1154.jpg

In this picture you can also see the Tilton pedals and the heim joint used to provide adjustment of the steering column. You can also see the vents for what was the air conditioning unit. We later abandoned the AC and returned to the factory heater unit:
IMAG1157.jpg

We didn't want a center console so we went with a pod from a GT jr. Here you can see we are fitting the gauges. The factory GTV gauges have a built in oil pressure gauge but since we had a separate gauge for the oil pressure we decided to use a Spider tach and Speedo:
IMAG2021.jpg


After everything was finalized, the dash was finished with texture paint with a top coat of vinyl paint. The look is incredibly close to the factory vinyl dash. Note how the lower pod was seamlessly blended into the dash - it looks like one piece. You could not have done that with the factory dash.
IMG_20150224_135001055_HDR.jpg


Here is the final arrangement of the dash. In addition to the Speedo and tach, we have oil pressure and temp, water temp, amperes, and fuel level. The switches are wipers, fog lights, heater fan and radiator fan. Idiot lights are low oil, brake fail, running lights and high beams. To the left of the steering column is the ignition key and to the right (where the lighter is typically) is a push button start. We have yet to install the 4 way flashers and a 12V socket:
IMAG2113.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Great build, thanks for sharing!

Can you tell us more about the rubber paint over the dynamat?
Really it's nothing special - Rustoleum Flexidip. I buy it at home depot:

paint.JPG


It is sort of a belt and suspenders approach. We originally used it because the carpets would slide on the slippery surfaces. Plus, with some carpets there are gaps between the edges and the silver would show through. When we have the bedliner, dynamat and the rubber paint applied to the floors we end up with a really solid feel and virtually no heat transfer (with the heat shield installed of course).
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Next was the rear shelf. We built a frame from box tube:
[iurl="http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=760401&d=1427916301"]
[/iurl]

[iurl="http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=760409&d=1427916314"]
[/iurl]

We used 1/2" plywood for the panels:
[iurl="http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=760417&d=1427916327"]
[/iurl]

[iurl="http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=760425&d=1427916343"]
[/iurl]


Which we then covered in vinyl. The shelf bottom lifts up for a fair amount of storage. We will cut a piece of carpet to put over the shelf bottom so the vinyl doesn't get scratched if something sharp is thrown back there:
[iurl="http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=760433&d=1427916352"]
[/iurl]
 

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Nice work as usual.

A couple of comments confused me. It is likely I miss-understood though ...

You said back in your earlier posts that the original GTAm flares were metal. That is incorrect, they were fibre glass.

Also what was holding the flares on until you put the rivets in? BTW: The rivets should have been painted but personal choice I guess.

Can I ask/suggest that the original metal arches that you cut off are donated to somebody else restoration project, expecially the rear arches. Would be a great use of the parts you no longer require.

Best
Pete
 
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