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Discussion Starter #205
Beautiful work!

Just curious, why the fancy T-Bar setup from Alfaholics instead of their Watts linkage?
  • Customer preference.
  • The car is a road car mostly and and the T bar is better suited for the street.
  • The Watts link kit is twice the cost in parts alone and labor to modify the diff to accept it would probably double it again.
  • Eye Candy.
 

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  • Customer preference.
  • The car is a road car mostly and and the T bar is better suited for the street.
  • The Watts link kit is twice the cost in parts alone and labor to modify the diff to accept it would probably double it again.
  • Eye Candy.
Yeah, makes sense. I'd sure like one though. They make the car stick like glue and that high roll center in the rear is a real challenge for handling.
 

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  • Customer preference.
  • The car is a road car mostly and and the T bar is better suited for the street.
  • The Watts link kit is twice the cost in parts alone and labor to modify the diff to accept it would probably double it again.
  • Eye Candy.
I'm curious why the T bar would be better suited for the street, as there are many decidedly non-racy cars that come with a Watts link from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #208
I'm curious why the T bar would be better suited for the street, as there are many decidedly non-racy cars that come with a Watts link from the factory.
Fair point - probably more perceived than reality. But the AH markets it's linkage as a racing modification... And the T-bar is basically a drop in mod whereas the Watts linkage requires modifying the diff and the chassis. In our case it wouldn't have been much of an issue since it was a ground up build but for the average person trying to figure what to spend money on I think the alloy T-bar would be the better choice of the two options.
 

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I've been driving my '67 Duetto for a few decades with the Sliding Block rear suspension I took out of my last race car. Other than needing a lot of regular maintenance (lube of the slider), It makes driving around local streets very nice. Corners like a slot car with no body lean, which is the major problem with the high T-Bar link.

And still original Alfa.

Robert
 

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Actually the Alfetta is a DeDIon rear suspension, not a Watts. Similar though.

Yes, if I had to buy a sliding block today I'd need to rob a bank. But I got this from AutoDelta nearly 50 years ago for about $300. Which was a lot then - a new set of high compression pistons was only $83.

Also, the sliding block really does need careful maintenance. If the lubrication is not done regularly, it can jamb and that makes for really exciting off road excursions almost immediately. But I barely get 2000 miles a year on my daily driver 325 Csi BMW, not even close to that on the Alfa!

Robert
 

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Hi Robert. I think you are talking about two different things. Just for conversation and to be excruciatingly correct, the Alfetta, with chassis mounted differential/gearbox and outboard hubs connected by a Dedion tube has the tube located by a Watts Link. From a theoretical standpoint, the tube could probably have sideways movement controlled by a Panhard bar, a Lotus 7 style triangle link, or even some form of sliding block, and the basic design could still be called DeDion.

:thumbup1: (maybe I had too much coffee this morning.....)

Actually the Alfetta is a DeDIon rear suspension, not a Watts. Similar though....Robert
 

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This thread is a testimony to what can be accomplished with vision, advanced-know how and copious amount of cash. I'm sure it will be marvelous, when completed.

Yet, I can't help agreeing with Pete's sentiments in post #197. I know it wasn't an intact OEM coupe, but I wish it had been a horrible beater and not such a sweet-looking coupe; even one with four lights!

To each his/her own...

Ray
 

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Discussion Starter #214 (Edited)
...
Yet, I can't help agreeing with Pete's sentiments in post #197. I know it wasn't an intact OEM coupe, but I wish it had been a horrible beater and not such a sweet-looking coupe; even one with four lights!

To each his/her own...

Ray
Guys, this was the worse then the worst beater. As nice as it looked, this car was a deathtrap - literally. The upper control arm anchors were so badly rusted that the first pothole would have torn them off - someone would have died.

RG Blasted 11.JPG


Beyond that, the entire rear end was totally distorted - look how straight the lower valence is - no curve. We had to replace the entire rear end. At that point - we may as well replace with the small tail light rear valence.

backend.jpg

And lots of other issues. The bottom line is that there was very little of the original car left when we got it so we felt no remorse in making the changes we did. At least no one died...
 

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What a piece of junk! LOL I’m so glad you guys worked it over as you did!

When I get my BIG money, I’m buying a Scalino and sending to you to make better than new with a TS and AC.

Ray
 

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Replacing things until very little of orginal left.

Decades ago when I was white-water canoeing and kayaking I got interested in old wood-canvas canoes.
Bought a "classic'--a Chestnut "Leader", Originally designed as a down-river racer it was 18 feet long and with lines that made it a fast boat.
A wood-canvas canoe has bent ribs to provide the cross-lines and long planks for the length.
So, we would do some day trips with the wooden canoe club.
One of the guys who was the guy that repaired such boats had a very old canoe that had a number of smashes that had been repaired.
As in new canvas, broken ribs and planks.
With the his own hits that he repaired as well, he figured that only 20 percent of the canoe was original.
Seems like the story with this GTV.
As Sprocket notes there was very little of the original car left.
:)
 

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Actually the Alfetta is a DeDIon rear suspension, not a Watts. Similar though.

Robert
alfetta is a dedion and it has a watts for a locating device.


I've been driving my '67 Duetto for a few decades with the Sliding Block rear suspension I took out of my last race car. Other than needing a lot of regular maintenance (lube of the slider), It makes driving around local streets very nice. Corners like a slot car with no body lean, which is the major problem with the high T-Bar link.

And still original Alfa.

Robert
robert... i think you have forgotten once again. sliding block effectively makes the car lean more due to the lower roll center. thats why they relocated to begin with to soften the roll stillness for more traction in corners. you dont ever recall seeing period gtams inner front wheels a full foot off the ground in corners? :)
 

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Decades ago when I was white-water canoeing and kayaking I got interested in old wood-canvas canoes.
Bought a "classic'--a Chestnut "Leader", Originally designed as a down-river racer it was 18 feet long and with lines that made it a fast boat.
A wood-canvas canoe has bent ribs to provide the cross-lines and long planks for the length.
So, we would do some day trips with the wooden canoe club.
One of the guys who was the guy that repaired such boats had a very old canoe that had a number of smashes that had been repaired.
As in new canvas, broken ribs and planks.
With the his own hits that he repaired as well, he figured that only 20 percent of the canoe was original.
Seems like the story with this GTV.
As Sprocket notes there was very little of the original car left.
:)
It's the paradox of the ship of Theseus- discussed as far back as the ancient Greeks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus
 
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