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Discussion Starter #1
A friend stopped by with his latest acquisition and burning desire to go fast.

The car is a solid driver as is with a fairly new paint, a near perfect interior, a nice running SPICA motor and most impressively everything works. So why tear it down?

This is going to be a serious go fast machine which will be pushed to limits. As such it needs to be straight, strong and reliable. This one fit the bill.

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Now before the death threats start rolling in, let me point out that this is not an original car and a lot of the parts are either aftermarket or from other parts cars. Everything we're taking off is already earmarked for other projects.

We'll strip it, blast it and then repair what needs to be repaired. Lots of Alfaholics goodies, lots of new stuff. Should be interesting. Stay tuned!
 

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Well, the nice thing about nord motors is that the go-fast repository of knowledge is pretty finite---building a good, fast, street motor is pretty much paint-by-numbers if you buy the right parts and do the right work. My advice is don't skimp. Build the best motor, suspension, running gear, you can. In particular, I suggest that you give some thought to fitting a close-ratio gearbox. If there's one (admittedly expensive) truly transformational change you can make in a 105 Alfa it's adding a c/r box. Once you drive one on the street ( 45mph in first gear!), you can't help wondering why Alfa never fitted them as stock. Just close you ears to the cries of heresy and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Phase I: Devo-

  • Remove the hood
  • Pull the motor
  • Strip the engine bay
  • strip the exterior trim
  • strip the interior
  • strip the electrical
  • Strip the drivetrain/suspension
  • Remove the glass
  • strip the the doors
  • Strap the shell to a cart
  • Send it out for blasting
GTV-RG 1.jpg

Two Canadian GTVs...
GTV-RG 2.jpg

Lift the back, pull the motor/trans/driveshaft as a unit.
GTV-RG 3.jpg

Almost there
GTV-RG 4.jpg

Done and done. I like the cheap HF furniture dollies for the motor.
GTV-RG 5.jpg

A couple of notes. Obviously I left off a bunch of steps (tried and failed to live stream the process - I'll try again with the silver GTV next month) but it takes two of us two hours to pull the motor. If it's your first time (PM me if you'd like a step-by-step spreadsheet) I would plan on a week of planning and procuring the tools you need, two or three good friends and a solid weekend.

Executive summary:
Our approach is to first drain and remove the radiator (My least favorite part - I always make a mess). Mop up any and all spills (I've slipped and bashed in a fender once - never again) and remove all the wiring and hoses from the motor. Again, if you're a noob you will want to tag, bag and take pictures of everything. Your first hard part is disconnecting the exhaust. If it's a hanging pedal car I usually unbolt from the head. If it's got standing pedals I will usually unbolt from the downpipe which is best done below the car.

Not completely necessary but I usually remove the alternator. This gives access to the tach cable. I spend about two minutes trying to disconnect it from the front cover. If it's not cooperating I just cut it. A new one costs fifteen dollars and I'm not going to spend an hour messing around with it.

The next tough job is removing the lower motor mount bolts. Actually it's the intake side that's the pain but if your motor mounts are old and collapsed it may be impossible to slip a 13mm wench in either side. BIG TIP: Jack the motor up to pull the mounts off the lower studs. You might also want to remove the center tie rod or the idler arm from the side wall (which you will need to do anyway when you are pulling the motor).

Under the car you're going to unbolt the trans crossmember, exahust hanger, the floor pan crossmember, the driveshaft center support and the front/rear driveshaft coupling. Disconnect the speedo cable and the ground strap and cut the rubber hydraulic clutch line (you're going to replace it anyway).

You are also going to need to get the center tierod out of the way so the bellhousing doesn't hang up on it on the way out. Two ways: You can disconnect one end of the tierod end and pull it away. The tierod ends can be really tough to break loose so the other option is to unbolt the idler arm from the sidewall. There are three M10 bolts (17mm socket) that hold it and are accessed from the wheel well. In either case, you'll pull the tie rod down and out of the way.

Back in the cabin you'll need to remove the shifter. Depending on the model you may need to remove center console, multiple rubber boots, carpeting, etc. Just be prepared to wrestle with this a bit. Once you've exposed the shifter yoke, you'll need two 11mm wrenches to remove the retaining bolt. TIP: Do not loose this bolt!! It is an M7, the only one of it's type in the whole car (except for 1750/2L upper oil pan bolts but you'll need those too) and you won't find a replacement at ACE hardware... Pull the shifter off the trans stud and put the nut and bolt back in the shifter yoke.

Lastly you are going to want to move the engine lift strap one set of studs forward. Mark the nuts to remind yourself that they need to be re-torqued.

At this point you are just about ready to pull. Raise the back end as high as you can. I've got a cool pneumatic axle lift but if you are smart enough to own an Alfa you can figure out a safe way to the lift the rear end. The three of you decide on signals (up, down, in, out, etc) ahead of time so you're not arguing about what you meant by "in". One on either side of the motor and one manning the lifting device. Take it slow. Up some, back some, rotate some, repeat. If you've got a good angle on the car it should come out pretty easily.

Did I leave anything out? Probably...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
...If there's one (admittedly expensive) truly transformational change you can make in a 105 Alfa it's adding a c/r box...
On the short list!

...Once you drive one on the street ( 45mph in first gear!), you can't help wondering why Alfa never fitted them as stock...
Hard to pull stumps with a C/R box...

...Just close you ears to the cries of heresy and have fun.
Already started ...
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I imagine we'll be seeing a lot of those ... in the rear view mirror
Yes, of course.....

Does your Spider do 0-60 under 5 sec. and a top speed of 160 ?

And that is for my lowly '92 model !
This GTV is what we call a "Coupe". The metal thing over my head doesn't fold down.

If you like I can check my Spider but I think 0-60 in about 12 seconds with a top speed of 103 mph. And that's a '66!
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Wait, my Viper did 0-60 in 3.5 seconds and topped out at 205 mph. That scared me though - I like the Spider better these days...
VIPER GTS #12051.jpg
 

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I expect that it will be the best looking fast GTV.
Good luck with the project and don't buy pistons that don't make power.
 

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Rich,
In your post #8, the second picture of two Canadians shows a thick-ish mat under the cars. What is that and are you using it to just catch fluids or as a padding for floor work? Or something completely cool different!!
Thanks,
��
 

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Well, the nice thing about nord motors is that the go-fast repository of knowledge is pretty finite---building a good, fast, street motor is pretty much paint-by-numbers if you buy the right parts and do the right work. My advice is don't skimp. Build the best motor, suspension, running gear, you can. In particular, I suggest that you give some thought to fitting a close-ratio gearbox. If there's one (admittedly expensive) truly transformational change you can make in a 105 Alfa it's adding a c/r box. Once you drive one on the street ( 45mph in first gear!), you can't help wondering why Alfa never fitted them as stock. Just close you ears to the cries of heresy and have fun.
ive never driven a 105 with a CR box. which cluster do you recommend for the streets the stradale gta or corsa CR. would it be worth while just to swap out a taller 1st on a standard 105 box? no personal experience with custom ratio boxes here unfortunately... at least that i can remember.
 

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CR would be tough on the street. tough on the clutch off the line especially. but doable. Looks like a good project!
 

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Stock ratios and a 4.1 axle give about 35 mph in 1st and 110 mph in 4th @ 7000, depending upon your wheel and tire size. You get there pretty quickly with 170 HP which is a reasonable target for a hot 2L street motor.
 
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