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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my long list of things to do on my Berlina, the windshield trim is coming up. The photo shows how it came with the car. I'm thinking that reshaping it won't be too difficult, as metal-working tasks go. Any suggestions? Things to do or not do? My thought is to straighten the pieces, short segment by short segment, between pieces of wood, then bend them to fit, probably with purpose-built wooden fixtures or maybe over the windshield itself. (As shown by the hazy reflection of the light on the hood, paint is on the list of things to do, too, but lower.)

Mark
1971 1750 Berlina
1972 Fiat 124 Spider

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I'm not a trim expert but I don't think that trim will ever be usable again. I'm fairly certain that I have a set of glue-in trim behind a bunch of stuff in my attic. If you can wait till the middle of next week, I can check then. I'd sell it pretty cheap since I'll never use it. I'm sure that there are others out there that have a set as well. Where are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm in Massachusetts. I started working on them, and I feel pretty good about how it's going, but it's really too early to tell for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well, I'm getting there. Still some waviness to get out, but it's doable. (I'm not aiming at concourse, of course.) I'm getting close enough to have started working on the top driver's side piece to conform it to the profile of the windshield, but that has brought up a question. Is the trim installed more or less parallel to the windshield surface? (By that, I mean do the inner and outer flat portions of the underside of the trim end up parallel to the windshield surface?) I imagine so, but that leaves a pretty big cavity underneath the trim, in the channel. Is that cavity filled with adhesive? That seems like a lot of adhesive, but if not, then the outside edge of the trim just abuts the body, with I guess a bead of adhesive on the body. That doesn't seem very secure. I've tried to look at windshield pics online, but it's hard to tell what's going on underneath the trim in those pics.

Mark


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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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That is great work! Does anyone sell windshields, glue in or gasket, in the US?
 

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Glue in, no. I had a used one I sold to a friend to replace his sand-blasted one, but I haven't seen a new one in 15 years. Gasket type, Mr Fiat lists them.
Andrew
 

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For info,
Small, gasketed glass is FW 00249, just over 21" at center. This is for all Giulias, US 69 Berlina, and all non-US Berlinas.
Large, glued glass is FW 00302, just under 22" at center. This is for US Berlina 71-74.
I have seen variance of 1/4" or so but these are the approx. right sizes. The body opening in all is the same, so if you have the right combo of glass, trim, gasket (or not) you can put any glass in any body.
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks! Here's where it stands now. There's a little waviness, and I've got more adhesive to clean up and the joint pieces to make if I can't find them (the corners are in the garage somewhere!), but I'm satisfied.
Mark

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Nice work Mark!
 

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For info,
Small, gasketed glass is FW 00249, just over 21" at center. This is for all Giulias, US 69 Berlina, and all non-US Berlinas.
Large, glued glass is FW 00302, just under 22" at center. This is for US Berlina 71-74.
I have seen variance of 1/4" or so but these are the approx. right sizes. The body opening in all is the same, so if you have the right combo of glass, trim, gasket (or not) you can put any glass in any body.
Andrew
The original Gasketed glass from my 69 Canadian Spec Super was 54.5 cm (21-3/8 in) middle. New one by Pilkington from Alfaholics is a little less at 54.2 cm

later). Re Originals also lists gasket type as Available. Is the centre joiner the same as on GTV and if so I may have 1 or 2.

Ken
 

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Thanks! Here's where it stands now. There's a little waviness, and I've got more adhesive to clean up and the joint pieces to make if I can't find them (the corners are in the garage somewhere!), but I'm satisfied.
Mark

View attachment 1690142
You have done and amazing looking job. You need to give use a step by step account.

Ciao

Ken
 

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Had to move about 30 boxes in my attic to get to it but yeah, it was there. Still has a bunch of rubber glue on the backside and a few minor scratches but it looks straight and still has the corner and middle joint pieces. I may just fabricate a reinforced shipping box for it and offer it up now that I've dug it out. Not quite as bad to ship as the very long pieces for the gasketed Supers and Berlinas. You need a set, Andrew?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here is what I did to straighten and fit the trim. First, though, I want to make clear again that the result is not perfect. If Bill ate his words and then saw the result, he might spit the words out again. But I think with more patience, the result could be about as good as desired.

First, I made this fixture:

trim fixture 1.JPG

I just wrapped sandpaper around a straight piece of the trim and ran it over the 2x4, front down, with four nails at the corners as guides. My original plan was to sand until the profile in the wood matched the trim, but I got impatient and stopped before that. As I explain below, I think it actually worked out better this way. After construction of this sophisticated fixture, I put some duct tape on it for a little more smoothness (and sophistication), I then laid the trim pieces in it, bit by bit, and tapped/pounded on a socket (17mm or so, I think) that fit the "trough" on the back of the trim to straighten the pieces. The trim is soft enough that I didn't need to pound very hard; I just worked my way from a straightish portion along the bends.

The reason I think not sanding all the way was good is that by not doing that, the force of the pounding at this point was concentrated in the center of the trim, since the edges did not contact the wood. Therefore less force was needed to straighten the pieces in the center. The downside is that the edges were not as straight as they could have been, with some waviness. So I then did this:

trim fixture 2.JPG

Those are pieces of duct tape with one edge rolled up taped to the edges of the "trough." After straightening the center of the trim, I used this to work on the edges. Because the edges are thinner than the center, the force needed was less. Depending on how I aimed the taps, either with the same socket or sometimes with a flat piece of wood, I could work on one edge or both.

The result of all this was a collection of flat pieces of trim, but of course the windshield is not flat, nor were the pieces shaped properly. Bending the trim isn't difficult, though, at least in the direction perpendicular to the windshield, and if the trim is held far apart, it's possible to get a nice smooth curve. In the parallel direction, it is a little harder, but not too bad. What I did for that was position the trim piece on its side on two pieces of wood spaced apart and rap it between them on the edge with a soft hammer. That worked surprisingly well, without significantly distorting the edge, and the spacing of the two wood pieces and the strength of the raps allowed enough control over the arc produced.

So, what didn't work? Well, it's very important to get the fit exactly right before gluing to the windshield and body. For the first two pieces, I was optimistic that I could use the adhesive (just a Permatex black silicone) to make final adjustments, but I was wrong, even using pieces of wood to position the pieces while the adhesive dried. Maybe a stronger adhesive would have worked; I didn't try that. So on those pieces I have some waviness from bending them on the car as I tried to make adjustments, and the adhesive-filled gaps are larger. On the other two pieces (a top and a bottom one), I took more time, and the results are noticeably better. Someday, I might remove the first two and work on them again, but that probably wouldn't happen until the car gets painted, because now it would be putting a silk windshield on a sow's body. And if I paint it, I might be removing all four pieces anyway.

The thing that made all this possible is that the pieces are surprisingly pliable. As Bill suggested, I think on more typical trim pieces it wouldn't have worked.

Mark
 
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