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Discussion Starter #1
I filled up with gas yesterday and this morning a line of gas followed me out of the garage! Looks like the gas is coming out pretty heavily from one side of the in line filter. Has anyone dealt with this problem before? Probably clogged but allowing enough gas to fire the engine. Can you simply pull it out between the two sections of hose and clean it out somehow? Or do I need a new one? I looked for new ones and don't see them online. I'm hoping you can clean them and reuse them? The gas is coming out of the side before the filter as it heads towards the fuel injector with the mesh cover.

The filter is the grey cyclinder with the "FISPA" name

Thanks for any information!

Brent
Spider Veloce 1979
 

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That "filter" is a check valve. It may be time to replace your fuel hoses.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Ed

Thats good advice! Have you bought a non FISPA check valve before? Did you replace it and your hoses? I've checked 4 online companies and haven't found the actually valve. Also are there two of these? When you say "check valve" is their a fuel filter in the back after the gas tank?

Brent
 

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The check valve is a one way valve that needs about 1 psi to open it. They rarely fail. I probably have a spare if yours is bad, but that is unlikely. Remove it from the line, wash it in soapy water and then blow through it. It should pass only in the direction of the arrow.

I am no expert on SPICA fuel plumbing, someone else will have to chime in on the filter locations.
 

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Yes, you should have an inline filter out back. I believe it is between the check valve and gas tank and is situated high up under the car near the spare tire wheel well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Marc,
Given Ed's comment that they rarely fail and the gas seems to be leaking on the left side of the connection as your looking at the photo perhaps the hose has simply worn out at that end. I suppose thats to be expected more often than not--a fatiguing hose where its exposed to elements near its end? And where its compressed by a clamp. I did try to tighten the connection to no avail.
Have you ever had yours leak here Marc?
Brent
 

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Thanks Marc,
Given Ed's comment that they rarely fail and the gas seems to be leaking on the left side of the connection as your looking at the photo perhaps the hose has simply worn out at that end. I suppose thats to be expected more often than not--a fatiguing hose where its exposed to elements near its end? And where its compressed by a clamp. I did try to tighten the connection to no avail.
Have you ever had yours leak here Marc?
Brent
No, I've never had a leak. I do have a small problem with my gas tank that needs a good flush and I will likely replace all gas lines at the same time as a preventive measure.
 

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My Spider is also a '79 and I replaced all the fuel hoses years ago. Yours looks like the original one. 35 years is a pretty good life for a fuel hose!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Indeed. I need to confirm with the previous owner they haven't been replaced but I think your eyeball test is correct. Was hoping to for a simple solution as I don't have the best of tools to do the job.
Brent
 

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SPICA has two fuel filters. One just after the fuel exits the gas tank. The second is a bowl arrangement in the engine bay about a foot upstream from the SPICA. If you've never replaced these, you should.
SPICA also has it's own little oil filter. Available at Centerline and the rest. It's easy to change, and you don't have to drain your oil to do it.
 

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I hate to be a downer but I thought my tank leak was from the filter. It turns out that these gas tanks have a tendency to develop leanks themselves and need replaced, at least that is what I've been told or I've read.

I will probaly replace the whole tank since it will only hold a few gallons before dripping.

This is even though the rest of the 1977 car is rust-free.
 

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Hose leak. Those hoses should have been replaced 20 years ago. You can keep the check valves of not. They are not essential. Got the Carb/Fuel Injection topic and download the guides in the "Spica Technical Guides" thread.
 

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Of course they do. Mostly associated with being left derelict for years and allowed to rust from the inside. You can remove the tank and take it up to a radiator shop and have them look at it. Good chance however it's better to just get a new tank.
 

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Did anyone else hear of or know of these tanks developing leaks though?
Mine developed a leak where the bung was brazed on. I took it to a radiator shop and had it cleaned out and welded shut. Cost $140.

But fix your hose leak first. Gas is very thin and if your tank is leaking you should be able to see it dripping out. Don't assume it's your tank, unless you observe it leaking from there.
 

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Has anyone successfully removed these check valves without any ill-effect? I’ve taken mine out to see if they function properly by blowing through them in the flow direction and they seemed take quite a lot of pressure to get any air through them so I’m wondering if they’re somehow stuck?
 

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I had them out for years with no issue. I recently out them back in, thinking it would help a bit of a hard start issue. My thought is that they keep fuel from flowing back out of the Spica, when sitting for days between starts. but it has made no difference at all.
 
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