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1973 2000 GTV
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So as stated in my restoration thread, found out my fuel pump (in the rear) is bad. So does anyone have the bosche OE part number for the fuel pump to cross reference? Or at least know the GPH rating for a US spec Spica GTV pump? I’m sure I can get a decent aftermarket one quickly but don’t want to over or under pressurize the Spica system.
 

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Here's the specs for Centerline's Bosch 3 port pump replacement. It's a FP-200 pump. It's supposed to do more than 200lph (about 53gph) at a max of 5-8 bar (72-116psi). I got a similar spec one on amazon for about $40.

 

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I’ve posted a couple of threads about replacing the original 3-port (NOT a Bosch product) pump with a Bosch 044 (or Chinese generic) and Holley regulator. The Bosch-pump-only approach generally requires a reduction of flow through the Spica, possibly increasing temps. The 044+regulator gives precise pressure control and equal or more flow via the regulator.
 

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Worth reading... Pretty much says that the Bosch L-Jet fuel pump (69414?) used in later Post-SPICA Alfa’s is a suitable and common replacement.

Excerpt from above:
The main supply pumps were primarily manufactured by Bosch, but also SPICA and AEG (very rare). The old AEG pumps were dry motors with a separate geared pump section. Bosch and SPICA pumps operate "wet," meaning that the entire interior including the electric motor section of the pump is bathed in fuel. Since there is no air in the pump, there is no danger of igniting the fuel. Although you can sometimes find rebuilt original supply pumps, the later Bosch supply pumps from the L-Jetronic systems work fine and are a good and readily available substitute. They are also new, as opposed to the rebuilt replacements. If you are replacing a 3-port pump, you will have to make minor modifications, by capping off the supply pump return line or removing it altogether (leave the main return line alone). The older pumps originally equipping SPICA injected Alfas look different from the L-Jetronic models.


 

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Worth reading... Pretty much says that the Bosch L-Jet fuel pump (69414?) used in later Post-SPICA Alfa’s is a suitable and common replacement.

Excerpt from above:
The main supply pumps were primarily manufactured by Bosch, but also SPICA and AEG (very rare). The old AEG pumps were dry motors with a separate geared pump section. Bosch and SPICA pumps operate "wet," meaning that the entire interior including the electric motor section of the pump is bathed in fuel. Since there is no air in the pump, there is no danger of igniting the fuel. Although you can sometimes find rebuilt original supply pumps, the later Bosch supply pumps from the L-Jetronic systems work fine and are a good and readily available substitute. They are also new, as opposed to the rebuilt replacements. If you are replacing a 3-port pump, you will have to make minor modifications, by capping off the supply pump return line or removing it altogether (leave the main return line alone). The older pumps originally equipping SPICA injected Alfas look different from the L-Jetronic models.


This above post is specifically what I advise avoiding.

An L-Jet two port pump will make the engine run. I am concerned about the long-term health.

To get an L-Jet pump to make the prescribed pressure, one must reduce the size of the return orifice. This reduces the quantity of flow through the Spica injection pump, and thus the cooling.

We might assume Alfa intended to have the original volume flow rate.

If you don’t mind a possible reduction in the life of your Spica, the L-Jet pump will make your car run.
 

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I was at a similar point 6 months ago. Burned my brain reading all the technical info on fuel pumps. Early 1750s (69) were 3 port, one was return as the fuel regulation was done by the spica pump. Later ones were two port. Also the fuel system is a way to cool thr spica pump by design. Hence the relatively high flow rate in the system.
Mine was converted to a 2.0 spica circa 1977 so I managed to track down the pump centerline gives. As I am in Europe it didn't make sense to buy a Europe made pump all the way from the US (plus shipping and taxes).
This is the manufacturer product page. Turns out it was used in plenty of Alfas through the 80s and 90s and plenty other brands.


Sent from my GM1913 using Tapatalk
 

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So as stated in my restoration thread, found out my fuel pump (in the rear) is bad. So does anyone have the bosche OE part number for the fuel pump to cross reference? Or at least know the GPH rating for a US spec Spica GTV pump? I’m sure I can get a decent aftermarket one quickly but don’t want to over or under pressurize the Spica system.
The fuel pump isn't bad, it just needs to be serviced from sitting for so long. I have done this many times. Works everytime.
 

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1973 2000 GTV
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Discussion Starter #9
The fuel pump isn't bad, it just needs to be serviced from sitting for so long. I have done this many times. Works everytime.
I apologize, sadly I’m too young to remember the thought of rebuilding a pump before replacing it lol. Just disassemble and clean or is there a particular rebuild pack for these pumps? It’s a 73 2000 Spica.
 

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After trying to rebuild 2 of those 3 port pumps to no avail I just decided to junk mine. Neither one worked, no matter how many O-Rings I replaced or parts I swapped between the 2. It might just be easier to convert to an inline in my opinion.
 

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This above post is specifically what I advise avoiding.

An L-Jet two port pump will make the engine run. I am concerned about the long-term health.

To get an L-Jet pump to make the prescribed pressure, one must reduce the size of the return orifice. This reduces the quantity of flow through the Spica injection pump, and thus the cooling.

We might assume Alfa intended to have the original volume flow rate.

If you don’t mind a possible reduction in the life of your Spica, the L-Jet pump will make your car run.
Ingram doesn't seem to have any issue with the Bosch L-Jet pump per Appendix 1 in his write-up.
 
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