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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What is the best way to remove the braided rubber fuel hose at the plastic line?
Cut the metal band, as was suggested here? With a Dremel, make multiple cuts parrellel to the line and peal back? Specifics are good.
How abuse-tolerant is the plastic line?

If this was a Chevy, I wouldn't ask. Given how near and dear parts are to come by, that's a different story.

Thanks.
 

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I haven't done this on the plastic line, however I intend to do this to my return line also.
I expect it to be easier than yanking it off a metal line, as I expect much less corrosion. I think if you can get the hose clamp off and then twist the rubber line against the plastic line, then it should break free. If it is still difficult to pull off, use a RAZOR to cut the rubber line. You only need one slit, I dont even think you need to go all the way through the rubber, just stick a small screw driver in and it will rip through your cut line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Anatomy of the FPR plastic return line fitting;

Do as I say . . . not as I do . . .

The fitting uses the same 'hat' (what the manual refers to as bush) as the injectors, yet I would not recommend using the soldering iron to melt the rubber, even though the tip is metal, as the heat could degrade the plastic line. Somewhere on the BB Greg Gordon stated that these 'plastic lines will last forever'. Well . . . heating them with an iron certainly won't help their longevity. Cutting the hat in three or four places and peeling the pieces back would seem to be the most prudent approach. In my case, the hose was so old that it was crumbling in pieces without too much effort so I opted for the deconstruction technique this time. Guess I should of heeded RacingSwim's advice, raise the priority, and replaced these hoses a few years ago. Amazing how well they can look from the outside and how dry and weak they are on the inside.

Thank you for your reply pangolin.
DL


Motor vehicle Gas Vehicle Automotive tire Rim



With hat . . .
Barware Gas Auto part Pipe Bicycle part
 

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Thanks for photo. So it's a metal hose barb formed onto the plastic line. Hmm, maybe twist and tug isn't the best strategy as it can twist from the metal hose barb and plastic fuel line, rather then rotted rubber line and hose barb.

I never thought that soldering iron against rubber fuel line was ever a good idea. I just twisted and tugged, and as a last resort razor bladed thru, as described above.
 

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I had success cutting the metal "hat" with a pair of snips, then carefully scoring the line with a razor. I think it took all of 3 minutes to get off. Probably the easiest fuel line replacement on the whole car.
 
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