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I've just purchased a 1969 GTV which has some small fuel leaks in the main central fuel line .... anyone know somewhere you can buy fuel lines ? I've searched the usual suppliers and found nothing listed. Thanks.
 

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Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP
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Welcome to the Board yorktownman.
And congrats on your new purchase!
By the main central fuel line, do you mean the metal lines from the rear of the car to front? If so, these can be made very easily using the proper size steel brakeline available at most autoparts stores. I've never seen any Alfa parts vendor that carried them. If the car originally came with carbs, that would be either 6 or 8mm (1/4" or 5/16"). If it came with Spica injection, the line would be slightly larger; 3/8" or 7/16" maybe? Don't know for sure.
Have any pics of the car?
 

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My 74 has 5/16" OUTSIDE diameter steel fuel lines with the SPICA system and they are original to the car, as best I can tell. Rubber hose forward of the supply pump is 8mm and tank outlet uses 1/2" rubber hose. Thanks for the reminder. I think I need to pull my metal lines off the car, remove the foam insulation and clean and inspect. The parts that I can see have some corrosion.
 

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Thanks for the info RT.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the information, I will try and pick up some new fuel line locally. I don't have any good pictures of the car yet but it arrives here tomorrow on the back of a transporter so I should post some then ! Thanks again.
 

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International Auto has a kit with all the hard fuel lines. I think it's around $50.00 (more then your local store). They will have to be bent to your current lines. I would also add the steel braided lines from Centerline...what a difference!
 

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Has anybody actually made up fuel lines by bending them to match the original? There are a lot of bends and I wonder how hard it would be to make up new ones. Mine are pretty rusty on the outside and one has the end broken off and I was wondering how big of a job it is to make new ones. Also, does anybody know why they are covered in insulation? Is it important to repace the insulation?
 

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My soft hoses are toast. I figured out where the gas smell was coming from. As soon as I squeezed the 1/2" hose leading from the fuel tank to the fuel filter, it fell apart.

Question: I purchasd the two fuel filters for the '69 GTV from International Auto and the rear fuel filter appears to be a diesel filter. Is this correct? If it is, I need to find a the sleeve/housing this filter is for. My current filter is a self contained unit.
 

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I have my answer: The above is a picture of the under the hood filter. IAP sent me the wrong filter for the rear.
 

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italianbikenut said:
Has anybody actually made up fuel lines by bending them to match the original? There are a lot of bends and I wonder how hard it would be to make up new ones. Mine are pretty rusty on the outside and one has the end broken off and I was wondering how big of a job it is to make new ones. Also, does anybody know why they are covered in insulation? Is it important to repace the insulation?
I am assuming that, for some reason, SPICA-equipped cars have different fuel lines running under the chassis than to carb-equipped models. I also want to fit fresh fuel lines to feed my carbs, seeing as I have a fresh tank, electric pump and soon a new engine too :). Are all fuel lines made of steel pipe or can they be made of e.g. copper alloy (etc) which would be easier to form?

Alex.
 

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Absolutely, positively, DO NOT fabricate fuel lines out of any soft metals. Use only steel. In an accident steel is much more likely to retain its integrity. Also, I would retrofit an inertia switch to cutoff current to the fuel pump in the event of an accident. Be wedged in a car dazed and not thinking to turn the key switch off, if a fuel line is breached the electric fuel pump is likely to empty the contents of your fuel tank under the car. I think everyone gets the picture.
 

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Roadtrip said:
Absolutely, positively, DO NOT fabricate fuel lines out of any soft metals. Use only steel. In an accident steel is much more likely to retain its integrity. Also, I would retrofit an inertia switch to cutoff current to the fuel pump in the event of an accident. Be wedged in a car dazed and not thinking to turn the key switch off, if a fuel line is breached the electric fuel pump is likely to empty the contents of your fuel tank under the car. I think everyone gets the picture.
Actually, I would go so far as to suggest getting stainless line if you can find/ afford it. There are a lot of new things in the fuels that Alfa could never have dreamed of- mostly some type of alcohol derivative. Some of these things are not so friendly to your average fuel line... The very modern rubber lines I see are great.

If you can't- it's NOT a huge deal, just adding a little more robustness to the system.

Hea- Roadtrip- I understand that early underhood filters are harder to get- my mechanic suggested converting to the later Spider filter- heard that?

Plus, for the rear filter- International may NOT have sent you the wrong one- they may have sent the ONLY one. I had to deal with that, too, on my GTV. At the same time, I changed the fuel lines in the rear. 1/2 full tank- no fun... but I only spilled less than a cup of fuel.

Eric Storhok
 

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IAP sent me Item Number 1997 (picture #1) for the rear filter, per their 'Search by Vehicle' site preference. What I pulled from the rear of the car is Item Number 314201 (picture #2).
 

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#1 is the filter that goes in the glass bowl filter/pressure regulator of early carburated alfas. Still available form several suppliers.

R
 

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turbolarespider said:
Actually, I would go so far as to suggest getting stainless line if you can find/ afford it ... The very modern rubber lines I see are great.
I felt sure I had recently seen a photo of a GTA with fully braided fuel line running under the chassis, but is this the rubber fuel line you were referring to? I think this is a pic of the underside of Max Banks' GTA replica. And how durable are they, really?
 

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turbolarespider said:
Hea- Roadtrip- I understand that early underhood filters are harder to get- my mechanic suggested converting to the later Spider filter- heard that?Eric Storhok
Nope. Haven't heard that. The heavy duty filtering is done by the rear filter. If you keep rotten fuel lines out of the fuel system, the front filter is going to last a long time.

Maybe Joe Cab from Centerline can chime in about the availability.
 

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You'll need one of these, or something similar, to avoid stressing the tube as it is bent. This photo is from www.frost.co.uk but these are available everywhere. Just do it slowly, as it is not a good idea to "correct" a bent tube. Copper brake lines are more forgiving, however.

P.S. I fitted a larger "Filter King" fuel filter in the engine bay, since my car only ever had one filter, and I liked the idea of having a larger filtration surface. The attachment hole spacing was the same as the original unit, and also allowed the fuel pressure to the carbs to be properly reduced, which was necessary since I fitted a Facet Red-Top pump in the same place where the twin Bendix pumps are located on the GTA/Ti Super, and deleted the mechanical engine-driven pump. This is on a separate switch from the ignition, thus allowing the float bowls to be primed before starting up. I'm in agreement with the inertia switch idea, I think there's a modern Ford part :eek: that has been recommended elsewhere.
 

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mubezzi said:
IAP sent me Item Number 1997 (picture #1) for the rear filter, per their 'Search by Vehicle' site preference. What I pulled from the rear of the car is Item Number 314201 (picture #2).
Gotcha- I stand corrected.

Alex- the rubber line I speak of does not really have a relationship with the braiding, it's more of a material choice than anything else. Modern rubber fuel lines are all manufactured to withstand the odd nature of oxygenated fuels.

It's quite possible that the braided line has excellent materials inside the braid, BTW. But you can also get good line that isn't braided.

If you really need to know, find out who manufactured the fuel line, and make sure that you can run E85 or M85 in it. If you can, it will easily withstand what typical gas has in it now.

Eric
 
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