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Does anyone see a problem here?:rolleyes: It seems to be a small fuel line leak. When the leak first started I thought that the rubber line was leaking. The fuel would run inside the insulation up to where the rubber line connected to the metal line. My questions are: 1. Can the metal line be replaced with rubber or braided stainless? Any comments about doing this would help. 2. If not are the metal lines available, if so, where? I plan to replace both supply and return lines.
1978 spider with Spica that works great. Thanks for the help.
 

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Small leak? where?

IIRC Yes you can replace it with rubber hoses, the high pressure ones that are special for fuel injected cars.
But ofcoz I can be wrong...
 

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You can, but SS braided would be far superior to just rubber. (stiffer so it helps support itself better, won't chafe through on the hangers/clips)

You should be able to pick up suitable hardline at a parts counter if you'd rather go that route. (if you've got the OD and length, someone will likely have something workable)
 

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I'm studying the pictures but I can't seem to see the problem. Let me go grab a cigarette and ponder on this a bit further... :eek:

If new fuel lines are not available from the usual suspects, I wonder if you could use brake line tubing? You can buy steel tubing for brake lines at any auto supply store. They come in various lengths and you can also connect two lines together to make it long enough for your project. Cut off the flared end, slide off the fitting and gently bend the tubing to the shape needed. Then attach new rubber hoses at the ends like the originals.

Here's a link that google found when I searched 'fuel line': Classic Tube
 

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I'm studying the pictures but I can't seem to see the problem. Let me go grab a cigarette and ponder on this a bit further... :eek:

If new fuel lines are not available from the usual suspects, I wonder if you could use brake line tubing? You can buy steel tubing for brake lines at any auto supply store. They come in various lengths and you can also connect two lines together to make it long enough for your project. Cut off the flared end, slide off the fitting and gently bend the tubing to the shape needed. Then attach new rubber hoses at the ends like the originals.

Here's a link that google found when I searched 'fuel line': Classic Tube
just a thought, in my old citroen all hydraulics was in hardlines as far as i remember, and it was not possible to use different type for ex. fuel lines, because (it will be hard to explain it for me) hydro lines did not have seams, and other lines did, so pressure was splitting the other lines...
what are pressure ratings for brake lines, vs hard fuel lines?
anyway you can always get some hard lines from some other cars, or im pretty sure that you can buy them somewhere per foot.
 

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Wow, that's one nasty looking hard-line. I'm surprised the frame rail and other visible areas of the underbody appear rust-free.....did something splash on that line that shouldn't have?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hard-line

Wow, that's one nasty looking hard-line. I'm surprised the frame rail and other visible areas of the underbody appear rust-free.....did something splash on that line that shouldn't have?
I don't know if anything got on the line to cause the damage. The factory insulation seemed intact when I peeled it back to find the leak. I suspect that some moisture got between the hard-line and the insulation. Thanks for all the replies. I purchased some rubber line rated to 50 psi for a short term fix. Should be driving by the end of the day.:D Will order ss line this week and be back under the car next weekend. Thanks again guys.
 

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I don't know if anything got on the line to cause the damage. The factory insulation seemed intact when I peeled it back to find the leak. I suspect that some moisture got between the hard-line and the insulation. Thanks for all the replies. I purchased some rubber line rated to 50 psi for a short term fix. Should be driving by the end of the day.:D Will order ss line this week and be back under the car next weekend. Thanks again guys.
Where did you find SS tubing? I have replaced about 4' of tubing with high pressure fuel injection line from NAPA and seems to be working. I wrapped the line with split bigger diameter rubber line where it is held by the brackets. I have had it on for over 2 years now with no problem. Would be interested in knowing where you found prebent tubing though.
Thanks, Bill
 

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When I was looking at replacing rusted brake lines for our RX7, I found that pre-bent stuff was almost impossible to find, and ridiculously expensive to buy or ship (long, thin, ruined if bent wrong...). The best local auto parts store suggested that tubing benders may be found at a plumbing supply or similar, designed for installing propane or natural gas pipes, which will work just as well on brake or fuel lines. Pretty neat tools for smooth bending, of a wide variety, are also available online, some for less than the cost of buying one section pre-bent tubing, but potentially useful for other purposes afterwards, as I found from a Dogpile search for "pipe benders", where a wide variety of quality possibilities emerge. Build your own Maserati birdcage replica with some that come up...
 

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I had the same problem with both my '69 Spider and my '73 GTV. I believe the rubber sleeve holds moisture in and over the years the steel rots from the outside in. Obviously fuel isn't going to corrode steel. I have temporarily spliced fuel hose but I am too am searching for the right replacement.

I think Terence is on to something. I'm not crazy about rubber tubing under the car. I think the risk of rupturing these soft lines outweighs the convenience. The factory put steel there for a reason (a good one IMHO). I also think that the brake lines are significantly smaller in diameter. With a SPICA system, I would be really leary of monkeying with the delicate balance of the system.

Just a quick glance at the lines makes me think that bending them would not be that big a deal with the right tools. Make a pattern and then sell them to us (with the ALFABB discount of course!).

My $.02 anyway...
 
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