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I know this has been covered before. I've been trying for a week to fix a leak from the copper washer of the center bolt on the front fuel filter. I tried all the ideas from other posts like, sanding the old washer with 600 grit, I even heated it up and cooled it down to soften the copper, I've tightened/loosened/tightened again. I found a perfect fit replacement new copper washer at Napa, no luck. I'm at my wit's end. I've tried not tightening too much, I've tried tightening a lot, any tighter and I'm sure I'll bust it.
How tight can I go?
Any ideas?

73 Spider, with Spica

fuel filter.jpg
 

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With some fine sandpaper, work both sides of the washer in a circular motion. Inspect for bad surfaces.

Make sure the surfaces are dry. I use a little bit of sealant just for insurance. Let it cure thoroughly before pressuring the system. And yes it does have to be pretty tight. I work the bolt back a forth a little to try and seal it well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Roadtrip. I actually was looking for a sealant that would be good for gasoline, in the end I couldn't find anything at Napa. Any names you know of off hand?
 

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Bill,
The sealant won't be directly exposed to the fuel. You are using it as a filler between the copper gasket and sealing surfaces. Try one of the Permetex products.
 

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Thanks Gordon and Roadtrip, and all previous posts on this topic. I think its fixed. I'll know for sure after a road test, maybe tonight.

In the end, I guess it was a little sealant that stopped the leak. I resanded the washer as smooth as could be (600 grit), sanded the top of the filter housing a little, even tried to sand under the head of the hex bolt. Then a very little bit of sealant under the head of the bolt and on the top surface of the filter housing, which places sealant on either side of the copper washer. I waited almost 24 hours to cure, and this morning just turned the fuel pump on for 60 seconds to refill the filter with fuel and check for a leak. So far, so good. I'll let it sit until tonight and give it a roadtest.

In the process of trying to tighten it too much about 10 different times this past week, I ruined the new 3 inch O-ring that came with the new filter. Thank goodness I kept the old O-ring, pinched, but good enough to work.

And I looked at both Napa and Oriely for the Type 1 Permatex sealant, that's good for contact with gasoline, but neither store had any of that type. So, I went with this other sealant from Oriely because it said it was okay for gasoline and remained pliable.
sealant.jpg
 

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The point is to fill the uneven surfaces. Looks as if you succeeded! As I restore Weber carburetors, I see a lot of this. It always amazes me when I find a Weber banjo bolt, torqued so tight that the fuel feed holes show elongation and twist. You would suppose this might be limited to just the brass banjo bolts, but NO, (!) somehow, people manage to twist the steel ones as well! You would think this would break the Weber top, but maybe I don't get to see those. The same happens to the FISPA FRB 11 tops, but those DO warp and break.
Flat surfaces, soft sealing washers, and if it still leaks, a tiny bit of sealant always does the trick. It should never take a whole lot of torque to seal the leak.
From my experience.
 

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In the picture of this fuel filter, on the far left and connected to the top just by the fuel exit port, there is a spot for a wire to hook up. Is this a solenoid or a sensor? Is it important? If it should be connected, where does the wire that connects to it come from?

My S2 spider has several wires in the engine compartment that are disconnected and don't go anywhere. It was converted from Spica to carbs and the air conditioner was removed before I purchased it. Trying to figure out which wires can be eliminated to clean up the engine compartment is an exercise in patience. :)
 

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I know this has been covered before. I've been trying for a week to fix a leak from the copper washer of the center bolt on the front fuel filter. I tried all the ideas from other posts like, sanding the old washer with 600 grit, I even heated it up and cooled it down to soften the copper, I've tightened/loosened/tightened again. I found a perfect fit replacement new copper washer at Napa, no luck. I'm at my wit's end. I've tried not tightening too much, I've tried tightening a lot, any tighter and I'm sure I'll bust it.
How tight can I go?
Any ideas?

73 Spider, with Spica

View attachment 214375
If you could not get it stop leaking with a new copper washer I would check the meeting surfaces where the washer seals. Seems like there is some damage here. You "should" not need a sealant. (Although if it doesn't leak now, don't touch it.)

/J
 

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Worst case, try a soft aluminum washer AFTER you check the flat of the through bolt and filter top.
 

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Spica Main Fuel Filter

I realize this is an older thread, but I thought I might sound a bit of a warning.

I pulled my '71 GTV out of the garage, and when I did I saw what I first dismissed as a couple drops of water. I did the smell test and sure enough it was gasoline. A quick exam revealed that the top of the FISPA fuel filter was damp. Checked hose clamps but soon determined it was the canister bolt. It had been fine for many miles so I guess the sealing washer just compressed and started to leak.

I had a new filter, rubber seal ring and the copper 10x16 seal washer. I did all the cleaning and sanding tricks to no avail, in spite of me torqueing on the 17mm canister bolt as much as I was willing to do. I did not have an aluminum washer of the proper size to try.

Wound up with a dab, more like a film of gas proof Permatex. That cured it without wrenching the snot out of it.

Just want to warn others to check it on occasion. I am especially concerned since it is such close proximity to the spark generating solenoid and starter brushes.

As an aside, does anyone know where I can get the bakelite or phenolic outer shell for the FISPA filter canister? Mine has long since cracked off and dispersed itself on the roadway. I would just like to have it for originalities sake even though it will make it harder to pass the canister through during filter changes. I remove the starter cable to make it easier now, after disconnecting battery of course.
 
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