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Siata, not Alfa Romeo or Ferrari, Italian exotic (Vienna, va.)
Date: 2011-01-15, 11:38AM EST
Reply to: [email protected]

BARN FIND!; This is an advance notification of an offering to be made in the near future of a '50-'51 Siata Daina Berlinetta, aluminum bodied by Stabilimente Farina, Turin, Italy. All major mechanical components intact. Original engine with matching numbers. Few known, will require a challenging restoration. Please respond with a phone number where you can be reached.
 

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Siata, not Alfa Romeo or Ferrari, Italian exotic (Vienna, va.)
Date: 2011-01-15, 11:38AM EST
Reply to: [email protected]

BARN FIND!; This is an advance notification of an offering to be made in the near future of a '50-'51 Siata Daina Berlinetta, aluminum bodied by Stabilimente Farina, Turin, Italy. All major mechanical components intact. Original engine with matching numbers. Few known, will require a challenging restoration. Please respond with a phone number where you can be reached.
Apparently, the seller doesn't yet own the car, but it simply trying to figure out if there's enough interest that he can sell it on eBay. After he actually buys it. Maybe.
 

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Quite a sophisticated advance notification of such a car with super broad mass appeal to the car collector world : Craigslist Washington, DC ...
 

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Email response from the seller to all who have contacted him:

Thank you for inquiring about the Siata. I am both amazed and frankly overwhelmed by the number of responses to the little Craigslist ad that have been received from all around the globe. Regretably, it is not feasable to individually phone all who have requested calls at this time. Hopefully this communication will provide the requested information for now, but please ask again if I have missed something.
About the car; it was acquired from the estate of a person who bought it over 30 years ago and did nothing to it except salt it away. For that duration it was securely stored in a masonry building with a concrete floor..
According to the keeper of the Italian Car Registry, two transactions involving this car occurred in Italy in the early '50's. After that it was lost to the registry until now.
Regarding its condition and completeness, aside from what you can see is missing visually from the pictures, we have noted that the fuel tank, some instruments and other dash items, left door internal mechanisms, and the pedals (why?) aren't there. The aluminum body panels have some dents and bruises, and there is damage to the right of the side-opening trunk door, from it not fitting properly. A crude attempt had been made to pull out a dent on the right side of it with a dent puller. The doors, which unlike all other panels, are steel and require rust repairs to the lower areas. The interior is believed to be original and is virtually complete. Under the hood everything looks undisturbed, and it has the original engine, the 1400 we believe, with matching numbers.
It is important to add that the Siata is Mille Miglia elegible.
Short of placing it on ebay, the figure we would be comfortable with is $39,000 US. For those who wish to make an appointment to view the Siata, please e-mail me and we will find a mutually satisfactory date..
Kindly accept my apology for responding in a somewhat wholesale manner, and do not hesitate to further inquire.
DSH
 

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IMHO, $39k is very strong money for a Daina that needs absolutely everything, and is missing so much.

Great car when you're done, but getting there will be expensive and frustrating to all but a small handful of people who know Siatas; to them, it will just be expensive. I'd be curious to know what Anton K thinks it would take to restore it.
 

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Here is a prime example of a neat car that needs to be purchased at the "token amount" price.

My opinion is that at this time, in this condition the car is worth, let's say, $10,000.00. Hopefully the seller paid about $5,000.00 for the car as it sits.

It will cost about $200,000.00 to restore properly.

If I had $210,000.00 I would do it... I like these cars.
 

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I agree that these cars are simply spectacular. I have no idea what it would take to restore but can imagine that it would not be an easy restoration as they are so rare and chasing down and remanufacturing the missing pieces is certainly painful.

$200k might be high but one can easily spend 6 figures. Maybe that is the reason that nobody restores those and all cars on the market are those "barn find" or aborted restos. At least, I cannot find pictures of nicely done berlinettas online with the exception to the ones that look like the convertible with a fixed roof (Also stunning).

I would also love to get crazy with one, restore it perfectly, if I had the funds readily available ...
 

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Easier to restore than you think

I've been watching this thread with interest and have a couple thoughts:

1) I think that the price is actually in the ballpark - maybe a little high, but not stratospherically. When a Double Bubble project easily brings $30,000, to find a limited-series Italian etceterini for under $40,000 you're probably going to be okay.

2) Dainas are wonderful cars to drive. Under-powered, yes, but light and rewarding. My experiences have been in convertibles, so I would imagine that the Berlinetta is even better.

3) I find the rear-end treatment on this particular example to be extraordinary and if this body was on a Ferrari chassis you'd be looking at 10X as much money.

4) These are easy cars to restore. I have recently rebuilt a SL-series 1400 motor and all parts were available at what I felt are reasonable prices. Gasket sets from Sangalli -http://www.sangalliguarnizioni.com/ Had liners made at Darton - where they have a pattern now btw - Darton Sleeves

For the balance of the car, sure you're not going to be able to call up Moss Motors or Carpenter Industries and order every piece off the shelf, but have you bought these Chinese-made-parts recently - they're junk. The joy of a Siata is that it is hand-made and so every single (non-Fiat) piece is replicable.

A labor of love, for sure, but well worth it -

My $0.02.

Stephen
 

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4. Easy cars to restore? There's certainly no mystery to the work required here. And mechanically, a 1400 Fiat isn't an exotic engine, and I can well believe that parts can be obtained without undue trouble and expense. But this appears to be missing every trim part, and the seller says that what you see is what you get. Trim pieces can always be fabricated, but in this case that would mean finding correct pieces to copy. And it means dealing with enormous amounts of time and money. Obviously we're going to disagree on what constitutes an "easy" restoration; this wouldn't meet my use of that term.

3. If things were different, they wouldn't be the same. This isn't a Ferrari.

1. It doesn't matter what a different car would bring. But anyone who buys a Fiat Abarth in this condition--missing all trim and needing absokutely everything--for $30k is a philanthropist; at least half that price ought to qualify as a charitable deduction.

Don't get me wrong--it's a wonderful car and deserves to be brought back to life. But let's not kid ourselves about this being an easy restoration--much less a cheap one.
 

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I agree with Ed, my opinion is minimum 50,000€ for the restoration + the instruments (hard to find) and 2000€ for the front grill.

P.S.
where is the engine?
 

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Actually the trim is the easiest piece on these cars - the majority of it is a straight channel that is available in lengths - you just cut it, braze small end pieces on it, grind on it till you're happy with it and send it off to the chrome shop. I think that it's still the same manufacturer in fact.

I think that we can all agree that easy has a lot of definitions, but there's no mystery to these cars. From my perspective it's no different than restoring any other 50's European car...

As to whether any restoration is economically viable in today's cost climate (esp. labor), well, that's another story.
 

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...I think that we can all agree that easy has a lot of definitions, but there's no mystery to these cars. From my perspective it's no different than restoring any other 50's European car...

As to whether any restoration is economically viable in today's cost climate (esp. labor), well, that's another story.
I think that we can all agree that if cost is no consideration, then everything is easy...
 

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I've been watching this thread with interest and have a couple thoughts:

1) I think that the price is actually in the ballpark - maybe a little high, but not stratospherically. When a Double Bubble project easily brings $30,000, to find a limited-series Italian etceterini for under $40,000 you're probably going to be okay.

2) Dainas are wonderful cars to drive. Under-powered, yes, but light and rewarding. My experiences have been in convertibles, so I would imagine that the Berlinetta is even better.

3) I find the rear-end treatment on this particular example to be extraordinary and if this body was on a Ferrari chassis you'd be looking at 10X as much money.

4) These are easy cars to restore. I have recently rebuilt a SL-series 1400 motor and all parts were available at what I felt are reasonable prices. Gasket sets from Sangalli -http://www.sangalliguarnizioni.com/ Had liners made at Darton - where they have a pattern now btw - Darton Sleeves

For the balance of the car, sure you're not going to be able to call up Moss Motors or Carpenter Industries and order every piece off the shelf, but have you bought these Chinese-made-parts recently - they're junk. The joy of a Siata is that it is hand-made and so every single (non-Fiat) piece is replicable.

A labor of love, for sure, but well worth it -

My $0.02.

Stephen
I agree with Stephen! The SIATA Daina Berlinetta is a lovely and rare car. A restoration on one should be simple and straight forward, and not that expensive.

Peter Zobian
 

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I agree with Stephen! The SIATA Daina Berlinetta is a lovely and rare car. A restoration on one should be simple and straight forward, and not that expensive.

Peter Zobian
I'm just ending to restore my Triumph Italia 2000. The car, before restoration, had a perfect body without no rust at all, and all the trims (except for the ashtray). You can't imagine how much work it need (again: it seemed quite perfect) and how difficult was to find the taillights, and the ashtray (that was missing) that, unfortunately, was the same of Ferrari 250 series. The ashtray alone, after one year of searching, costed to me 500$.

Don't undervaluate the effort on details of these italian cars, they could make you crazy.....especially on cars quite "unknown" like the Daina Coupè Farina.
 

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Hi, it's strange for me talking with you in another language on another forum....anyway, the fact is, as you know, many people likes a car and they want to restore it and to drive it. They don't take care to the colour, the wool/leather of the upholstery, etc. This is the main reason why we find purple Lancia Aprilia with black leather upholstery and many rosso Ferrari B20. It's very difficult to restore properly a car, like a painting or a furniture, because you don't need just the money, you need also the culture.
 

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Hi, it's strange for me talking with you in another language on another forum....anyway, the fact is, as you know, many people likes a car and they want to restore it and to drive it. They don't take care to the colour, the wool/leather of the upholstery, etc. This is the main reason why we find purple Lancia Aprilia with black leather upholstery and many rosso Ferrari B20. It's very difficult to restore properly a car, like a painting or a furniture, because you don't need just the money, you need also the culture.
HI PG,

yes, it's strange to write in english with another italian guy but, yes, that's the globalization ;-)

I agree with you that restoring a car it's first a matter of culture: you have to study properly, especially when you put your hands on (very) limited series car.
Unfortunately i'm one of those who doesn't accept the "take it easy" approach in restoring a car. With a car like the Daina of this post, you only know the point where the restoration starts from, but you could never know how and when will you end....
 
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