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Discussion Starter #21
Now repeat for the passenger side. The only difference is that the passenger side, RH, threads on the spindle are right handed. So the usual Righty tighty, Lefty loosey.

Once the passenger side is done, clean the fronts of the rotors.
1 (77).jpg

And finally, bleed the brake lines. I use a pressure bleeding system.
1 (78).jpg

There you have it. You can replace your bearings or use this to re pack the ones you have, using a new seal for the inner bearings.

Thanks again to all who have posted previously so that I could learn from you.

Good luck,

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I've never seen grease applied to the outside of the hub seal and the adjacent area of the spindle. Who instructed you to do that?
That's the way I found it, so I followed.

Vin
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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It had probably leaked out. No need to do that, but it'll be fine.

You can do this job without a shop press like you did, but having a press sure makes getting the races in and out easy. Those screws holding the caliper to the hub are also the reason everyone should own an impact driver, as it's the one place I always use that tool.
 

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I too have something to say....

Many thanks Vin!
Another great fully illustrated instructional:)

(It is not always easy photographing everything whilst actually doing these jobs, when you are covered in grease and cursing a bolt that won't loosen!)
 

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Discussion Starter #26
It had probably leaked out. No need to do that, but it'll be fine.
That makes sense. I will remove the reference from the thread.

Thanks,

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I too have something to say....

Many thanks Vin!
Another great fully illustrated instructional:)

(It is not always easy photographing everything whilst actually doing these jobs, when you are covered in grease and cursing a bolt that won't loosen!)
Thanks Dom,

As always, I hope the thread helps someone.

Vin
 

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Hi Vin
GREAT job posting a pictorial on your project!!
I know it took a bunch of extra time to take the photos!!
PapaJam is proud of ya
You've made a great reference for those who follow
Good on ya
Paul
 

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Hello Vin,Thanks,another great write up.Should this method be the same for our early drum brake cars? Where did you get the German bearings?
 

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Good job there Vin, well done. Why though did you feel you needed to take the rotor off to change the bearing? I would also like to add that with 40+ years experience doing this sort of job, dont pack to much grease in the bearing, first it isnt needed and second too much grease can when it gets hot, it will, force its way past the oil seal, thats probably why you had grease there when you dismantled. You dont want grease escaping and getting on the brake rotor.

Can I offer a time tested method to set the preload on the taper bearings? We, I, have never used a torque wrench to set the preload, OK if you have a high quality tool, looked like yours was Snap-On, but at those very low readings it would be ever so easy to overtighten if the torque wrench was a little out, an aviation dial gauge torque wrench would work though. Overtight bearings will run hot and destroy themselves very quickly.

Before filling the bearings with grease, dry assemble the hub, with just some light oil. Tighten the hub nut continually spinning the rotor, tighten it till the rotor just gets tight, then back off a little. At this point be sure the rotor now spins freely. Now either, or both, count the number of thread grooves, or count the number of turns needed to remove the hub nut, make a note. Fill the bearing with grease (rolling the bearing in your hands full of grease is the only way I have ever done it), but dont overfill, grease in the cavity will never find its way to the bearing and IMO is a waste. Now re-assemble, tightening the hub nut up to the number of thread grooves or the number of turns of the nut, continually turn the rotor to ensure everything seats properly and it does not overtighten. If when you are happy with everything replace the split pin, if there is not a hole that lines up, back off to get a fit dont tighten further. With the wheel replaced there should be only minimal play and the wheel should spin very easily, if it does not, stop! Go back over everything you just did.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Hello Vin,Thanks,another great write up.Should this method be the same for our early drum brake cars? Where did you get the German bearings?
Thanks.

I was able to get the bearings from Rockauto.com

Sorry, I am not familiar with the early drum brake cars. Hopefully, someone can chime in.

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Good job there Vin, well done. Why though did you feel you needed to take the rotor off to change the bearing? I would also like to add that with 40+ years experience doing this sort of job, dont pack to much grease in the bearing, first it isnt needed and second too much grease can when it gets hot, it will, force its way past the oil seal, thats probably why you had grease there when you dismantled. You dont want grease escaping and getting on the brake rotor.

Can I offer a time tested method to set the preload on the taper bearings? We, I, have never used a torque wrench to set the preload, OK if you have a high quality tool, looked like yours was Snap-On, but at those very low readings it would be ever so easy to overtighten if the torque wrench was a little out, an aviation dial gauge torque wrench would work though. Overtight bearings will run hot and destroy themselves very quickly.

Before filling the bearings with grease, dry assemble the hub, with just some light oil. Tighten the hub nut continually spinning the rotor, tighten it till the rotor just gets tight, then back off a little. At this point be sure the rotor now spins freely. Now either, or both, count the number of thread grooves, or count the number of turns needed to remove the hub nut, make a note. Fill the bearing with grease (rolling the bearing in your hands full of grease is the only way I have ever done it), but dont overfill, grease in the cavity will never find its way to the bearing and IMO is a waste. Now re-assemble, tightening the hub nut up to the number of thread grooves or the number of turns of the nut, continually turn the rotor to ensure everything seats properly and it does not overtighten. If when you are happy with everything replace the split pin, if there is not a hole that lines up, back off to get a fit dont tighten further. With the wheel replaced there should be only minimal play and the wheel should spin very easily, if it does not, stop! Go back over everything you just did.
Hello Top Down,

As I look back, I guess you could leave the rotor on. I followed the Shop Manual and they separated it.

I appreciate you sharing your experience with us, as I am sure others will who follow.

Thanks again for sharing.

Vin
 
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