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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All,

1991 Spider Veloce, 93,xxx miles.

I have been working on improving my braking and as a result, I was checking how much play I had at the tires. I found that all 4 have too much play for my comfort, the rears having a lot more than the fronts, so I decided it was time to change the bearings.

On this job, cleaning, greasing the bearings, spindles etc. is a messy job so lots of shop towels and gloves are needed.

Thanks to all who have made posts and or threads of their adventure's on wheel bearings that I read over and over and over again.

While I spoke to Papajam a few years ago about this project, this is the first major project for me that I have done without him. I would usually call him on a Sunday morning and chat about the project and I would make notes feverishly of what he was telling me. This time I couldn't but was thinking about him throughout.

For you Jim, RIP.

Let's start.

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Place car on jack stands. Ensure that the car is stable.
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Remove the tire.
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At this point, with some forward thinking, I sprayed the flat head screws that hold the hub/rotor assembly together with some liquid wrench. We will come back to these screws later.
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Place a catch pan under the brake caliper to collect any brake fluid that might/will be spilled while removing the brake caliper.
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Discussion Starter #3
Using an 11mm wrench, remove the hard brake line fitting from the brake caliper.
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Place a vacuum cap over the fitting so you don't lose all your brake fluid, empty the master cylinder and get in a bunch of trouble you never asked for. :grin2:
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Using a 19mm socket, remove the 2 bolts holding the brake calipers. Remove the caliper.
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Remove the centre cap.
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Once you remove the cap you will find the nut secured with a cotter pin. Mine was full of grease but I cleaned it up a bit first. Straighten the cotter pin and remove.
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Using a 24mm socket, remove the nut. Here we are removing the driver side, LH. This side has left handed threads, so its Righty loosey, Lefty tighty. Have to remember that.
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At this point, if not stuck, you can wiggle the hub/rotor assembly back and forth and pull forward. This will allow you to get the washer and outer bearing out. They come out easily.
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You are left with the greased spindle.
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Discussion Starter #5
Clean the spindle and inspect for damage.
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Flip the hub/rotor assembly over and remove the seal with the weapon of your choice.
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That is some dirty old grease!
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Remove the inner bearing. Again, comes out easily.
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Now, remove the flat head screws and separate the hub and rotor. Hopefully, your screws won't be stuck. 3 of mine were good with just one Buttana seen on the right!
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Clean out the old grease from the hub.
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Nice and clean! Will re clean before we install the races and bearings, but they look so good after all that mess.
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Now to replace the races. Place the hub so that the outer race is facing down on some 2x4's.
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Discussion Starter #7
Using a punch, I used brass so as not to damage the hub, knock the race out by tapping it round and round. I followed the 12 o'clock, 6 o'clock, 3o'clock and 9 o'clock pattern until it came out.
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Did I say tap tap tap? I meant whack! whack! whack! Have to hit those races pretty hard to get them out.
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Eventually, the race will fall out the bottom. Note that the race has 2 sides. One with an edge and one with a flat. The flat side is the side that gets inserted into the hub on installation. That is why we see it here on extraction.
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Add some more height to the wood stand. Flip the hub over and knock the inner race out. Again, see the flat side.
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Using brake cleaner, give the hub another thorough clean.
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So bright and shiny!
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I used SKF bearings for this project. Here is the outer bearing.
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You can see that the race and bearing can only fit together one way.
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I "rented" (free once you bring it back) this bearing race and seal driver set from my local parts store. They didn't have metric, but this SAE was close enough.
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Choose the size that best fits your race. The race fits the side with the step on it.
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Place the race in the hub, FLAT SIDE DOWN. Here we are installing the outer race.
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Using the tool, slowly start to set the race in the hub with some taps so that the race is installed square. Once it is started, give the tool some sharp hits (see the top of that tool?) until the race is seated. You will know the race is seated as the hammer will start to bounce back at you. If you don't understand, you will when you do it.
1 (32).jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
First race installed!
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Here is the inner bearing/race part number from SKF.
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Same as the outer race, install race FLAT SIDE DOWN.
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Choose appropriate driver and install.
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Discussion Starter #11
Inner race installed.
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Use brake cleaner to clean the bearings and races again prior to greasing.
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This is the high temp bearing grease my local parts store had. Things about to get messy so lots of gloves needed!
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Put grease into the centre of the hub. The manual says 2.5oz or so, but I couldn't fit that much. I would say fill the cavity 3/4 or so.
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Discussion Starter #12
Onto greasing the bearings. You can grease the bearings using the palm of your hand (see many YouTube videos) or use a tool. There are a couple of tools out there but this is the one I used. Worked really well.

Place the bearing, larger side down, onto the tool.
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Screw on the top of the tool.
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Attach your grease gun to the fitting at the top of tool and start pumping.
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You will know the bearing is greased when you see the grease start to ooze out the bottom.
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Discussion Starter #13
Remove the top of the tool and here we have your inner bearing greased.
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Take some of the grease and wipe all around the outside of the bearing. Rolling it in your palm so that all the bearings are coated.
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Grease the inside of the race and install the bearing.
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This is the SKF seal I used for the inner bearing.
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Discussion Starter #14
As with all seals of this type, grease the inner ring so that the spring is held in during installation.
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Using the bearing race/driver tool, choose the appropriate size (using the flat side of the tool) to drive the seal in.
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Drive in the seal. This took more time than I expected as the seal kept popping out, but with some forceful persuasion, I go them to stay in.
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Once the seal is in, put a bit of grease on the inner lip of the seal where it will be in contact with the spindle.
1 (52).jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Now, the same procedure for the outer bearing, but no seal here.
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Grease the spindle.
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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
At this point, the hub/rotor assembly will be going back on soon, so I cleaned the back of the rotor as it has become dirty.
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Add some anti seize to those flat head screws that hold the hub/rotor together.
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Re-assemble the hub/rotor.
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Discussion Starter #17
Slide the hub/rotor assembly back onto the spindle. Insert the outer bearing.
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Insert the washer.
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Put on the 24mm nut. Here we are putting on the driver, LH, nut, so Lefty tighty, righty loosey.
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Torque to 14.8 thru 18.4 ft/lbs. I torqued to 16ft/lbs.
1 (64).jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Back the nut off a few turns
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Re torque to 3.7 thru 7.4ft/lbs. I torqued to 6ft/lbs.
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Once the second torque has been done, unscrew the nut by 90 degrees. Here again, we are doing the driver, so start at 3 and loosen to 6.
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Discussion Starter #19
Insert the cotter pin. There are holes in the spindle at 12/6 o'clock and 3/9 o'clock. If a notch on the nut and hole on the spindle don't align, screw the nut to the minimum to align.
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Bend and trim the cotter pin.
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The washer should be able to move ever so slightly. If not, the nut is too tight.
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Add some grease to the nut. Not really sure if this is needed but I see it everywhere so I did it anyways.:grin2:
1 (72).jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Replace centre cap.
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Add some blue loctite to caliper bolts.
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Re attach caliper. Torque spec is 54.6 thru 61.2 ft/lbs. I tightened to feel.
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Using 11mm wrench, re attach hard brake line to caliper.
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