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I just ordered the rebuild kit from centerline for my 86 quad. Do I need to have the special ball joint tool that IAP sells, or will a standard ball joint fork work. Is there any other special tools that I need other than kevlar knuckles?

Thanks
 

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1966-2013
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Do you need thier exact tool? No, simular is fine. The design itself really does lend itself to easier disassembly.

Will a pickle fork work? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. (though concensus seems to be more 'no' than 'yes')

A hammer will certainly help things along, (even that splitter doesn't always work depending on how perfectly you put it on), but beyond that, whatever you're going to split the joints with and a few common tools.

Of course you'll need something to allow you to remove the spring pans without killing yourself.

There's several solutions for that, but the more popular ones are the actual factory tool (if you can find one) or threaded rod and nuts for home-built jackscrew affairs (a bit slower, but safer by far than trying to lower a pan on a jack, which you shouldn't do anyway)
 

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Hey TSuppa!

I have been planning on getting that kit, myself. Please post your progress - I am sure I'm not the only one who has interest.

Thanks!
-Phil
 

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front suspension

Use the search function and you will find previously posted descriptions and pictures...I did. I found the "threaded rod" method to work great, though tedious. I recommend borrowing or purchasing a purpose made tool for popping ball joints loose. Available from the usual Alfa suppliers or Harbor Freight and others.

Gmack
Minneapolis
74 GTV
69 Spider
 

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1966-2013
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The Centerline 'all in one box' kit is pretty good by any standard, but you have to call before ordering to make sure they have all the parts in stock, or be prepared to go off hunting the odd bit here and there. (though if they don't have the full kit in stock, they're usually pretty gracious about lowering the price or allowing you to substitute about anything that is of equal or lesser value. No promises on that part though :) )

If complete, everything you need is there 'cept the ARB bushings to do a nice safe feeling rebuild. (as in you don't feel like you left something out)

Quality parts, (no instructions), a really good warm fuzzy feeling when you get it all put together and after the 1st alignment on the assembly (measure everything with the old parts on the bench before just going nuts undoing tie-rod ends form the shafts unless you want to call a flatbed to get you to the radiometer...... I believe Eric/ghnl and a couple others posted the baseline measurement specs for the tie rods and center rod in the event you do forget)

BTW, your alignment guy will love you for bringing it in onaconna he prolly hasn't seen/worked on a car with all the bits he has to deal with being all shiny, new and not frozen in place for, oh, years. Not to mention it's likely been about as long since he even saw an Alfa unless it's happens to be a proper shop. (I'd suggest 1/2 a tank of fuel and sitting in the car during the alignment if you can swing it with the shop. Reasoning is posted elsewhere in a couple other theads, but suffice to say you'll likely be happier for it in the long run, at least if you drive with any kind of agression at all)

Oh, and do the guy a favor: all the left end stuff gets the left threads, all the right end stuff gets the right threads. ;)
 

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...and do the guy a favor: all the left end stuff gets the left threads, all the right end stuff gets the right threads.
And do yourself and some future guy a favor and apply anti-sieze to the the threads.

I believe Eric/ghnl and a couple others posted the baseline measurement specs for the tie rods and center rod in the event you do forget)
Reposted:
 

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