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Thanks, Vin. I've given myself a couple of weekends because I don't want to spend more than 4 hours per day rolling around on the ground. One question about the sway bar, if I may. As I look at the current set-up, the entire sway bar seems to be shifted to the left so that the left link is basically vertical and the right link is angled toward the center of the car. I'm guessing it should be centered so that the links on both sides are angled slightly toward the center. Am I correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #122
Thanks, Vin. I've given myself a couple of weekends because I don't want to spend more than 4 hours per day rolling around on the ground. One question about the sway bar, if I may. As I look at the current set-up, the entire sway bar seems to be shifted to the left so that the left link is basically vertical and the right link is angled toward the center of the car. I'm guessing it should be centered so that the links on both sides are angled slightly toward the center. Am I correct?
Yes, the sway bar should be centered.

I looked at my endlinks and they are basically vertically straight.

Good luck,

Vin
 

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Dog-bone Ends - Nut Torque?

Hi Vin,

Perhaps an ignorant question - however, I'm uncertain if your torque values (related to the dog-bone end nuts) apply for the early "2-bolt" dog-bones? I ask this because 1) they're different and 2) they have a 27mm nut on the end - as compared to your 24mm nut.

Thanks in advance and great write-up!

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #125
Hi Vin,

Perhaps an ignorant question - however, I'm uncertain if your torque values (related to the dog-bone end nuts) apply for the early "2-bolt" dog-bones? I ask this because 1) they're different and 2) they have a 27mm nut on the end - as compared to your 24mm nut.

Thanks in advance and great write-up!

Chuck
Hi Chuck

I don't have a definitive answer for you but looks like 60sRacer has jumped in. Thanks.

Glad the thread is helping you.

Good luck,

Vin
 

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Hey Gee Vee,

Please let me know what you think of the poly bushings. I saw on Vintre's post that you did your front end last year and I need to do ALL my bushings on my "78 Spider but am not sure how much poly I want. It's not well controlled now and the ride is firm and it's a daily driver and I don't want to do it twice.Thanks, Patrick.
 

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Thanks

Thanks to this thread I took on this job myself... currently have all the suspension stripped down! The A arms have also beee fully dismantled. Only issue that I am having is undoing the tie rods... two will not budge!

The plan is to blast and repaint all of the metal then fit with new bushes etc...
 

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Discussion Starter #128
Thanks to this thread I took on this job myself... currently have all the suspension stripped down! The A arms have also beee fully dismantled. Only issue that I am having is undoing the tie rods... two will not budge!

The plan is to blast and repaint all of the metal then fit with new bushes etc...
rooony,

Glad that the thread has helped.

Make sure you post those shiny re painted parts when your done!

Good luck,

Vin
 

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Minor issues

Vin, great write up. I just acquired a '91 Spider and will be doing the entire front end.

But, I must bring up a point to those that may be knew to working on their cars and to you as well. Putting jack stands up on wood blocks is CRAZY and dangerous!! There is too much of a chance of those blocks slipping against each other should accidental sideways force be placed on the car. You say you don't like to extend your jack stand up? Get bigger jack stands. What you are showing is no better than just using stacks of wood blocks without a jack-stand. Please amend the part where you show that picture and warn people of its inherent danger. It may have worked fine for you, but I'd hate to hear about someone getting injured from this.

On another note, I am a bit over anal about things. In this case, it's with the cotter keys. When you bend cotter keys on a castellated nut, one end should be trimmed and bent up along the side of the nut. The other, longer end should be bent fully back across the top of the nut and bolt, trimmed to the edge of the bolt and then (most people don't even know to do this), use the back of your closed dikes to push it down tight and remove the sharp burr from the end. Learned this in shop class way back in '73 as a way to avoid slicing your fingers when inspecting the car!

I said I was anal, didn't I?
 

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Safety first. I would bet many or most of us can barely believe we are still allowed to walk this earth after some of the dumb things we have been party to over the years.

It takes another minute or two to make things safe.


BTW: Thanks and hats off to Vince once again for the helpful info. The photos and tips provided are very valuable.
 

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Discussion Starter #131
Vin, great write up. I just acquired a '91 Spider and will be doing the entire front end.

But, I must bring up a point to those that may be knew to working on their cars and to you as well. Putting jack stands up on wood blocks is CRAZY and dangerous!! There is too much of a chance of those blocks slipping against each other should accidental sideways force be placed on the car. You say you don't like to extend your jack stand up? Get bigger jack stands. What you are showing is no better than just using stacks of wood blocks without a jack-stand. Please amend the part where you show that picture and warn people of its inherent danger. It may have worked fine for you, but I'd hate to hear about someone getting injured from this.

On another note, I am a bit over anal about things. In this case, it's with the cotter keys. When you bend cotter keys on a castellated nut, one end should be trimmed and bent up along the side of the nut. The other, longer end should be bent fully back across the top of the nut and bolt, trimmed to the edge of the bolt and then (most people don't even know to do this), use the back of your closed dikes to push it down tight and remove the sharp burr from the end. Learned this in shop class way back in '73 as a way to avoid slicing your fingers when inspecting the car!

I said I was anal, didn't I?
Hello Feex,

Thanks for the note.

I certainly want everyone, including myself to be safe. When I place those jackstands on the wood, I always, always, give the car a good push to make sure that it is stable.

Having said that, I will screw the boards together and add a warning to that first picture.

On the cotter pin, I agree with you, bend the pin down over the nut and the other piece up across the bolt. When I reviewed my pictures, I see that is the way the factory did it. I can see that I show it correctly on one picture and incorrectly on the other. It's winter here, so I have time to go back and do it correctly on all of them.

If you post a picture of your "anal" :) method, I will be happy to insert it at the right part of the thread.

Thanks again for the advice.

Vin
 

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Maybe bares repeating with photos.. With engine in car, driven off the street....where is the most appropriate place jack point and to position jack stands in front only..assuming you don't use the jack points at all and you've set the car in gear, locked the parking brake and chocked the rear wheels.. Does anyone support the idea of just using one jack stand on the corner you are working on? I think I would also just firm up just contact with a floor jack on the jack point as a safety measure...signed anal too. Let's assume this case is for spring removal..
 

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I've always used the front cross member. Just be careful in using a wood block (2 x 4 x 9+) between the jack head and the cross member. It is the strongest part of the front end, but you can dent it if you are too rough.

BTW - I then put jack stands under the jack points and set the car down on them. Anyway, the jack gets in the way of nearly anything, and using it alone would cause big trouble if it leaks down.

Robert
 

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I am not a mechanic, but like most of us that have Alfa's, am learning and hopefully, this will help someone take the job on.



Vin, who says you are not a mechanic??? Thank you for the great helpful information. I will be digging in soon.
 

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I am much more conscious of jacks and jack stands recently - maybe that's an age thing? A colleague's husband restores old rods as a hobby, was in the garage alone, and a car rocked off the jack stands and pinned him against a wall - luckily he wasn't under it. Broke some ribs, other damage. His wife was in the house, couldn't hear him, and he was out there for quite a while. It could have gone badly.

Recently I noticed my huge floor jack easing down onto the jack stands as it sat. I usually leave some pressure on the jack as a back-up. But I hear settling and clinking from the stands, hmm... OH, now there's a little puddle of fluid under the jack.... OOP, looks like it needs new seals! Pretty good for 30-some years I guess, but something to think about if you haven't backed yours up with solid stands.
 

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Yeah, I just bought a new jack.. my old one died after 35 years... Yes, I hear too many horror stories of garage accidents by even the best mechanics. At 74 next month, I don't want to do something stupid UNDER a car.. In the end I'd rather pay someone to do that work that requires de-compressing springs, exhausts, etc...Also working with a "buddy" is almost mandatory like swimming in the ocean. They can test your judgement and keep one out of harms way too. The extra set of eyes and ears really is invaluable. As i get older, i hope I've gotten wiser.
 
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