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Discussion Starter #1
I'm getting ready to reinstall my front springs now that my work with the Centerline front suspension kit is done....

Question:

How should I compress them? I rented a Pep Boys spring compressor ( a good deal: you pay a deposit equal to the value of the tool, keep it as long as you want, and they refund it when you return the tool). However, since there's no (big enough) hole in the spring pan for the threaded rod this compressor really won't work very well. I can hook onto the side of the spring but I'm not really very happy with that idea.

Will the 'threaded rod' system used for removal work for the reinstall too?

Is there another method?

My search here didn't turn up anything...

thanks!
 

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You should NOT use the spring tool that clamps to the outside of the spring !
These are designed for MacPherson strut type springs and can comeoff suddenly.
The threaded rods beween the lower arm and the spring pan works very well of install and removal.
There is a cool factory tool to remove/install springs, but it is rare and expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks.... I won't use the McPherson Stut compressor then. But if the factory tool is rare and expensive, there must be another way as people seem to be changing front springs quite regularly.

By what method????
 

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"The threaded rods beween the lower arm and the spring pan works very well of install and removal"
Do a search here and you will find threads with pictures and descriptions on how this works.....
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Ok, I've done some digging and found out that the secret magic search word is "Allthread" for instructions on how to replace the springs. Allthread is another name for "threaded rod" - a search which doesn't return much or perhaps too much to find the threads with the details. I think I'll make a suggestion that the "Allthread" method for replacement of front springs be put into the FAQ....



For future pilgrims, here are links to a couple threads.

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/sus.../153056-105-front-springs-removal-change.html

"Allthread, AKA threaded rod, some nuts and washers. 2 needed and used catty-corner to each other on the pan to lower things evenly"

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1965-1974/148793-front-spring-removal.html

"The "all thread" method is really VERY easy once you know the little tricks. Gigem mentioned a stack of washers to keep the nut below the spring pan lip. Another is to use a ratcheting wrench to turn the nut down the allthread. Make the top end of the rod shorter, as there is limited clearance, and then double-nut it. As you work the pan down, only the bottom nuts will turn on the threads. On reassembly, put a floor jack under the pan and spring to put it in position. Then put your 2 allthread rods in and begin turning it up. When you have it close, put the bolts through the other 2 holes and get them started. "

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/suspension-brakes-wheels-tires/110913-front-spring-spacers-2.html
"Other than the unobtanium Alfa-specific tool, there's no conventional spring compressor that'll function as well as these--
3/8" all thread, grade 8 nuts & washers, threaded couplings--all available at your neighborhood hardware store. Do a search you'll find more how-to details. "

"It doesn't need to be grade 8.

It's used to lower the front spring pans without worrying about the spring blowing it off and mangling you.

At minimum you put in two catty-corner to each other and walk the pan down incrementally via the threaded rod. Using four is even more secure, but IMO a bit overkill and it definitely makes it a slower process."





 

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Lokki -
I think we're in the same place. I love how quickly assembly goes once the insanely long task of cleaning, de-rusting, undercoating etc. Feels good huh?

Can you confirm that on USA cars there is a thin sheetmetal spring receiver sitting on the top AND bottom of each spring (between the spring and the rubber pad)? I am having a pain of a time trying to figure out what I don't have one from the bottom.
 

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you can use long coupling nuts (lowes) with a few washers at the bottom and use a ratcheting box end wrench to make this petty quick (grease the rod) . I only use 3 threaded rods and only loosen one bolt at a time to replace with the threaded rod. Once the threaded rods replace the original bolts, loosen each a little at a time lowering the spring pan until all the pressure is removed--
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Sheetmetal spring receivers top & bottom = Yes

Lokki -
I think we're in the same place. I love how quickly assembly goes once the insanely long task of cleaning, de-rusting, undercoating etc. Feels good huh?

Can you confirm that on USA cars there is a thin sheetmetal spring receiver sitting on the top AND bottom of each spring (between the spring and the rubber pad)? I am having a pain of a time trying to figure out what I don't have one from the bottom.
R-mm -

Yeah, it's a great feeling to be putting things back together..... and all purty and shiny, sigh. And it's nice to have someone in the same battle zone to compare notes with as we progress.

As for metal spring receivers top and bottom on the front suspension, yes. I'm pretty sure that my front suspension had never been touched, and it had them in both locations. The tops were fine but the bottoms were mostly rust and dust....yet they were definitely there.


Have you tried Larry at APE (Alfa Parts Exchange)? I'd suspect that you could get a used pair for not much money; the tops and bottoms are identical so any pair that can accept a good coat of paint are going to work fine.

Note - Spring receivers top and bottom in the FRONT only. In the rear, they only go on the top. Let me know if you need a pair for the rear 'cause I have an extra set of those lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Success !! and Thank you !

Did this very successfully yesterday with two rods catty-cornered and it works as easily as advertised. Using the long coupling nuts is recommended - just don't forget to buy a deep well socket that fits them when you're shopping - that saves a lot of time and trouble. The combination of a deep socket and the coupling nut gives you a lot of travel up the rod using a socket wrench. Note: Under the spring pan and between the coupling nut, I used small washers; larger ones tended to get caught at an angle.

Zip-tying the rubber and metal spring rings to the top of the spring is recommended. Might consider doing the same on the bottom - ensures that the springs will be properly fitted to the step in the rings.

Don't forget to put a pad under the spring pan before you use the floor jack to support the spring pan - otherwise, you'll be retouching your beautiful paint (don't ask :eek: ). The original rubber pad on your (my) speed jack ain't that good.

I put the rods in the front corner where the swaybar attaches and the opposite side rear. I had to bend the top of the rear rod to keep it away from the fenderwell... didn't hurt anything, but might consider cutting that rod shorter rather than bending it.


This would be a good place to ask for advice on the best time and way to reattach the front swaybar - I put mine back on after the springs were done, but it was a !%@#% - well let's just say it took awhile and an <strike> Italian </strike> Sicilian curse dictionary. There must be a better way, and I'm sure that a lot of you know how to do it but I didn't...

In summary, this is a pretty easy and safe method to do the springs. At no time did I think I was going to die:D. Do be aware that you are probably going to lift the car off one of the jackstands at one point - not a problem but be sure that the jackstand is properly aligned before you lower the car back down. Best to have two people.

Thanks to everyone for building the history of how to do this - that history alone is a good reason to pay to keep the bulletin board alive and well. I literally couldn't have done it without you all. The comradeship is just a bonus :cool:
 
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