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What is the wear rate for the 164 front control arm bushings? I replace my passenger side control arm about 5 years ago and now I think it's worn again. Have not checked yet but started a few days ago, I hear a click-clunk sound when I make left turns and the car seems to drift a bit in mid corner. Exact same symptoms I had 5 years ago. I never had to replace control arms so frequently with other cars. Could this be?
 

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The front suspension is asked to do alot.
Check the other "suspects" too: strut bearings, tie rod ends, ball joints, etc.

Just to be thorough.
 

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Check sway bar lollipop link rubber bushings at A-arm for noise. Check loose steering rack and tie rod (inner tie rod in particular) for steering drift.
 

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There's really no wear rate per se since my dads L might go 400 years with how he drives and my S might go 10 years. So it's a check all components kind of deal. My L has the click clunk too and I suspect strut bearings.
 

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What is the wear rate for the 164 front control arm bushings? I replace my passenger side control arm about 5 years ago and now I think it's worn again. Have not checked yet but started a few days ago, I hear a click-clunk sound when I make left turns and the car seems to drift a bit in mid corner. Exact same symptoms I had 5 years ago. I never had to replace control arms so frequently with other cars. Could this be?
They tend to last a long time if conditions are right. Oil and fluids can eat them up fast.
I also tend to tighten at least the rear bushing down when the car is level on the ground to spec ft/lbs which is I think 32ft/lbs. (same on rear trailing arm bushings/hub bushing, tighten to spec when car is level to get maximum life)

Sounds like Strut bearings to me, little yellow bearings can cause drifting and clunking but also Check, control arms, sway bar bushings, chassis and end link.
But a click may be a CV joint. Check the boots and Motor mounts

Jason
 

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If a constant Click, click, click, click in a turn it's got to be a CV joint. If just a single click, clunk, than something suspension, like the yellow lower bearings, ESPECIALLY if you have never done those, than I would bet money on those. ;)
Charles
 

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Discussion Starter #8
front suspension noise on left turns

Thanks for everyone’s input. Here is more info on my car:
Koni shock and Sparco springs plus new strut bearing installed about 6 years ago
Passenger side control arm replaced 4 years ago
Driver side control arm and ball joint, both sway bar endlinks replaced last month

The only thing that I have not replaced (100K mi) are the passenger side ball joints and sway bar to chassis bushings. Visual inspection shows the sway bar bushing looked like Yorkshire pudding… have the bushings and on my to do list…
 

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Thanks for everyone’s input. Here is more info on my car:
Koni shock and Sparco springs plus new strut bearing installed about 6 years ago
Passenger side control arm replaced 4 years ago
Driver side control arm and ball joint, both sway bar endlinks replaced last month

The only thing that I have not replaced (100K mi) are the passenger side ball joints and sway bar to chassis bushings. Visual inspection shows the sway bar bushing looked like Yorkshire pudding… have the bushings and on my to do list…
OK. Here is a little advise. Replace in pairs at all cost. When the control arm was done the other side should have been done as well. Both ball joints, end links etc and so on not only to make the repair even if you will but there is no guessing when stuff was replaced. I understand there are budgets involved but those items are not too expensive and should have been done together, IMO.
Now A simple test is to have someone turn the wheel back and forth while you check the lower bearings for clicking and popping.

Make sure there is no oil leaking from either the oil pump pulley seal, rear cam seal, rear valve cover, or oil pan gasket dripping on the smaller control arm bushing. That may be the reason for the high failure rate on that side.

Also check steering rack bushings.

Jason
 

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OK. Here is a little advise. Replace in pairs at all cost. When the control arm was done the other side should have been done as well. Both ball joints, end links etc and so on not only to make the repair even if you will but there is no guessing when stuff was replaced. I understand there are budgets involved but those items are not too expensive and should have been done together, IMO.
Now A simple test is to have someone turn the wheel back and forth while you check the lower bearings for clicking and popping.

Make sure there is no oil leaking from either the oil pump pulley seal, rear cam seal, rear valve cover, or oil pan gasket dripping on the smaller control arm bushing. That may be the reason for the high failure rate on that side.

Also check steering rack bushings.

Jason
Dittos what Jason said.
I had a leaky steering rack accelerate the decay of my lower A-arm bushings.
 

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