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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever experienced this? Normally the endlink bushings are so tightly fitted on the swaybar ends that you have to burn them off then cold chisel the metal sleeves. Mine are loose, now. I wa sunder the car reattaching the airdam and doing an oil change when I noticed this (as a result of cranking my noggin into it). I can literally pull the links laterally from the both bar ends. I suppose it could be the bar is just heavily worn to the point they're loose? Or the bushings are the wrong size - is the later MIlano bar heavier/thicker, maybe? The way the bar loads up in corners maybe it's not unsafe to drive, but just sloppier than it should be. Still... new bar in order? This is weird, yall.

I'll get a pic or a video later, if I can.
 

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I bought a set of sway bar end links from International Auto Parts back in the 90s that popped free like you describe within a few miles. I assumed they were defective and they gave me a refund.

It might just be poor quality parts.

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Contact Andy at Performatek for some poly replacements. Easy to install, they must be oriented a special way that Andy will describe to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's always possible I got the wrong parts. I've had to send back a few orders over the years (not just Centerline) because I got stuff for a different car. I doubt I got the wrong Alfetta bushings though, as the older bar was skinnier and so they would probably be too small instead of too large.

I need to order rear links and bushings too, so I'll probably just get a load of stuff from Performatek all at once.
 

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Are you talking about the bushing ID, being free to turn on the sway bar ends? Heck-- they have to rotate, or else the links cannot pivot as the bar moves through its arc with body roll. They will bind up, adding more roll stiffness to the front end, giving you WAY more understeer than normal. Likewise the bottom stud on the control arm has to rotate. Look at the photo I post here, although Mike's car has the Shankle sway bar but the principle is the same.

Guys-- I went through this with his GTV 6, with a ton of understeer in the front end, so much so that pushing it any faster than 7/10, the front end simply would skate across the road, refusing to obey the steering input. I put it all off to excessive camber or bad geometry, since the front end had been lowered a bit too far by the PO. Last year, I pulled the links off to replace the crumbling rubber sway bar bushings with new poly items. The first thing I noticed was that the lock nuts at the top and bottom of the links, were drawn up very tight. When I loosened them a bit, they would pivot freely on the bar and the LCA stud. I immediately took the car off the lift, aired up the tires, and took it out for a drive. It behaved like an Alfa should--- going where it was pointed! The difference was a total transformation in handling, with just a hint of understeer, going over to neutral steer as speed increased. I knew then what had happened.

One cannot lock up the suspension with binding sway bar links, introducing a ton more roll stiffness, and expect things to work as designed. Yes--- I know the 105 cars are designed with bushings that are meant to twist, but I reject the notion that THESE bushings should not pivot freely. In fact, when I finished installing the new poly bushings, I cleaned off the shoulders of the pivot bolts, greased them lightly, and just snugged up the locknuts slightly. The links themselves can pivot as they need to, as the geometry forces them to do.

Others may argue, but that was my own experience hands-on, seat of the pants. That's why there are self-locking nuts on there. Yes, there are designs that have pinch type rubber bushings, with the sway bar ends clamped into the rubber, Other designs use rubber bushings on the LCA that are meant to deform to a degree. I get it. But look at the links on the 115 Spiders, front sway bars-- they use freely pivoting studs top and bottom. I say let it move! :oops:
20171022_202309.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So this is what I'm talking about. I was able to pull the link away from the bar, the bushing was so loose. I can push it flush against the grommet, or pull it away more than 1/4". It's that loose.
IMG_4710 copy.jpg
 

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Well, that's the OEM bar and bushing design, as opposed to the photo I posted of the aftermarket bar. And on the 105 cars, I recently learned that their bushings are a press fit on the end of the bar. Much to my surprise! So in your case, maybe the rubber IS meant to be in torsion as the suspension moves. I still don't like it, though.

Others??
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The a-arm bush should torque left to right and the bar end Bush front to back. Of course the bar should only be loading up laterally, so in a right turn, for example, the bar end in the left would load up, closing the gap. But there should not be a gap. I get the feeling the bushings I received are for a heavier bar.


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The upper end of the link is supposed to go on the end of the sway bar with a medium press fit. The lower end of the link goes onto the A-arm stud with a slip fit. Since the upper and lower bushings are (supposed to be) the same, the OD of the machined end of the sway bar should be about .001" or so larger than the OD of the A-arm stud.
 

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The best swaybar links have a couple of heim joints, so that there is freedom of movement. Any binding, as Dave points out, is deleterious to the proper functioning of the bar. Check out OKP's links for their swaybar. I thought Performatek used to have them, but I can't find them on the GTV6 suspension page, now.
 
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