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"STUPID Kimi"?!?! I think he has shown that he is quite bright as well as one hell of a driver. And that Michael has done most everything in his power as to not allow Kimi on his team, I think is quite cowardly.
 

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I wonder why Kimi always is the one with the broken down car or with the "freak accidents". He either is a bad-luck magnet or just careless with the material, either way he will not be a good driver on any team.

And if we are talking what he is doing off-track (glug-glug)...
 

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Discussion Starter #365
Sprintn said:
And that Michael has done most everything in his power as to not allow Kimi on his team, I think is quite cowardly.
Interesting to know what, exactly, Michael has done to "not allow" Kimi on the team. Several stories I have read indicated that he would welcome Kimi on board, and he certainly was aware of the pre-contract that was widely reported/speculated that Kimi and Ferrari signed earlier this year.

I, for one, would love to see a super team of MS, Kimi, and Massa all racing next year. Three Ferraris - heaven!
 

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I agree with Monty...my gut tells me it will be Schumi and Massa. I sure hope so! I hate Kimi, but that's not a driving critique. The guy CAN drive. I just can't stand HIM, and I love pulling for Ferrari (as I'v done since 1982 or so), and I would hate the double-edged sword of pulling for Ferrari, even though Kimi's in the driver's seat. I hope it's MS and Massa.

David
 

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Per bbc.com :

"Renault have named Heikki Kovalainen as their replacement for world champion Fernando Alonso, who is leaving the team to race for McLaren in 2007.
The Finn will partner Giancarlo Fisichella, who signed a one-year extension with the French team in June."

No surprise, as that rumor had been floating around for some time now.

David
 

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Yes just heard the news glad I went to Montreal DAM!! I'm going to miss seeing the best driver ever. Sad but can't say I blame him either stupid changes in F1 and he has been unappreciated throughout his career.

Lets see who will ever come close. NO ONE !!!

A legend in my opinion will be framing my tickets and developing my pictures.

Can't wait for the press conference....:(
 

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Discussion Starter #371
Monza Qualification - should make for an interesting start tomorrow. Whoever is behind Heidfeld will be held up and quickly lose ground.

01 K. Räikkönen McLaren 1:21.484
02 M. Schumacher Ferrari 1:21.486
03 N. Heidfeld BMW 1:21.653
04 F. Massa Ferrari 1:21.704
05 F. Alonso Renault 1:21.829
06 J. Button Honda 1:22.011
07 R. Kubica BMW 1:22.258
08 P. de la Rosa McLaren 1:22.280
09 R. Barrichello Honda 1:22.787
10 G. Fisichella Renault 1:23.175
11 J. Trulli Toyota 1:21.924
12 N. Rosberg Williams 1:22.203
13 R. Schumacher Toyota 1:22.280
14 D. Coulthard Red Bull 1:22.589
15 S. Speed Scuderia Toro Rosso 1:23.165
16 C. Klien Red Bull no time
17 V. Liuzzi Scuderia Toro Rosso 1:23.043
18 C. Albers Midland F1 1:23.116
19 M. Webber Williams 1:23.341
20 T. Monteiro Midland F1 1:23.920
21 T. Sato Super Aguri 1:24.289
22 S. Yamamoto Super Aguri 1:26.001
 

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Although I'm not Schumacher's biggest fan, I must admit that I am disappointed to see him leave. Plus... it would have been a great show to watch him race side by side with Kimi in the same car. But it dose seem as if Schumacher has spent soooo much time out in front by himself over the years, his race craft has suffered... as is evident by the mistakes he makes when in a close battle with a competitve car/driver.
In my book, Senna is the best ever.. but that's a whole different thread. LOL!!!

Sprintn
 

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Shumi will do fine with retirement he has plenty of money and why risk your life. He has nothing to prove he has broken records and achieved ledgendary status.

As far as who is or was the best driver I watched Senna but I was younger then and can't remember any of those races too much. But I don't want to compare the two just appreciate them both for what they did/done.:)

Tiger Woods compared to jack Nichlas or Gretzky vs Gordie Howe

There is so many athletes the list may go on for quite some time.

I didn't like Gretzky but can appreciate his talents for what they are.

So why all the hatred toward Shumi?

Sad to see him go maybe he will start his own team.

Kimi well I don't know ....Hard for me to cheer him on I think F1 fans will notice a void when Shumi leaves. I for one will suffer not watching him any longer. :(

Monza interesting the damage on Alonso car he will have to make repaires most likely don't think he will do well tomorow and the gap should narrow as far as points. Be nice for Shumi to make it interesting....One final hoorah!!!
 

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That was such a crock of $h!t... Alonso getting called for blocking!!! I'm sure he had nothing to do with Massa's qualifying time!!! Some of these drivers these days... if they just see a driver up ahead they throw the "Blocking" card!!! I think it's called not getting a clean lap... kind of like in the old 1 hour qualifying sessions.
 

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Discussion Starter #375
Sprintn said:
That was such a crock of $h!t... Alonso getting called for blocking!!! I'm sure he had nothing to do with Massa's qualifying time!!! Some of these drivers these days... if they just see a driver up ahead they throw the "Blocking" card!!! I think it's called not getting a clean lap... kind of like in the old 1 hour qualifying sessions.
Well, IMHO the feed clearly showed Massa being held up, although I agree that in general whining about "blocking" has become an excuse for any poor lap. I posted the complaint figures during the Monaco debate, and they seem to have increased since then - kind of like taking a dive in football (soccer), hoping to draw a foul or card.
 

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I guess my point is that, everyone out there is flying and not intentionally slowing any one up. If you don't get a clean lap... that's just they way it is and part of "Everyone on tack at the same time" qualifying. Now... if you could argure that the driver up front swerved or left his driving line in order to slow you up and prevent you going by... well that is what I would call blocking. But getting stuck behind someone that is pooring his heart out trying to get the best time he can... that is just part of it. My take... get a fast lap in whenever you have a clean lap becuse at some point, you are going to come up on a slower car that is also trying to get a fast lap in.
 

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Discussion Starter #377
Monza Results. Obviously a big win for MS as disaster finally strikes the bulletproof Renault engine. Of course very sad to see MS retire, but at least his chance to go out as WDC has improved.

01 M. Schumacher Ferrari no time
02 K. Räikkönen McLaren + 8.000
03 R. Kubica BMW + 26.400
04 G. Fisichella Renault + 32.000
05 J. Button Honda + 32.600
06 R. Barrichello Honda + 42.400
07 J. Trulli Toyota + 44.600
08 N. Heidfeld BMW + 45.300
09 F. Massa Ferrari + 45.900
10 M. Webber Williams + 1:12.600
11 C. Klien Red Bull + 1 laps
12 D. Coulthard Red Bull + 1 laps
13 S. Speed Scuderia Toro Rosso + 1 laps
14 V. Liuzzi Scuderia Toro Rosso + 1 laps
15 R. Schumacher Toyota + 1 laps
16 T. Sato Super Aguri + 2 laps
17 C. Albers Midland F1 + 2 laps
Did not finish
18 T. Monteiro Midland F1 + 9 laps
19 F. Alonso Renault + 10 laps
20 P. de la Rosa McLaren + 33 laps
21 S. Yamamoto Super Aguri + 35 laps
22 P. de la Rosa McLaren + 44 laps
 

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That'll just about do it for me for F1 this season. What a crock. Alonso HAD to have been going as fast as absolutely possible - he had no choice - and Massa got nowhere near him. I didn't bother to watch the race - as soon as I saw that I just hit "delete" on the TiVo. Obviously Shumacher was going to win. Did he do it on merit or did they penalize somebody to get him out front? Screw Bernie, Max and the rest. Good riddance to Schumacher. Races will be a lot safer without him.

I'll go to Montreal again next year because the cars are fabulous. But as a sport it's a total farce.
 

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Discussion Starter #379
GV27 said:
Screw Bernie, Max and the rest. Good riddance to Schumacher. Races will be a lot safer without him.
Interesting, how when the stewards penalize MS they are infallible, but when Alonso gets penalized it is somehow unfair.

FYI, Schumacher took the lead during the first round of stops and raced without incident. Alonso, on the other hand, cut a chicane to pass Heidfeld (and didn't relinquish the position) and then passed Kubica on the pit lane. Hmmmm. This is also the guy who, if you looked at the Moncao qualy sector times, lost virtually nothing when Michael's car was "parked," which means he ignored the local yellow.

That said, I know nothing will change the minds of the "conspiracy" crowd and Schumacher-haters. Success, especially of historic proportions, engenders jealousy, envy, and hate, and generally brings out the worst.

On a positive note, big congrats to Kubica - podium 3rd in his 3rd race. Given that he is from Poland and not the son of a WDC, I doubt he will get the press that Nico has, which is sad given that he produced a podium with a brilliant drive today. I think we'll see more of him on the podium in the future.

While politics in F1 seem as bad as ever, I wouldn't give up on it. With Michael's departure, the field is wide open, there are a bunch of very exciting young drivers like Kubica getting rides, and it would appear that McLaren, BMW and Honda are getting better. It could be, and I hope so, that we will see a season with 4-5 competitve teams as opposed to the 1 or 2 of the last decade.

Ironically, from the race commentary and articles today, it appears MS may have been railroaded out of F1 by Bernie, Max, and the FIAT board. He was clearly unhappy today - not the look of someone looking forward to or even reconciled to retirement. If true, the supposed "fixers" essentially "fixed" Michael, or as the conspiracy crowd might say, "what goes around comes around."
 

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Taken from www.f1.com



Michael Schumacher - the end of an era


10 September 2006







After 90 wins, 1354 points and seven world championship titles, Michael Schumacher has announced he will retire at the end of this season. Statistically the greatest driver the sport has ever seen, Schumacher has, over the past 16 years, set a new standard to which younger drivers can only aspire. He may have courted controversy at times, but with his departure, the sport will lose one of its leading lights.

Born on January 3, 1969, Schumacher’s beginnings were surprisingly unremarkable. The son of a bricklayer who also ran the local kart circuit, the young Michael took to his father’s track like a fish to water. He won his first championship at the age of six - an early demonstration the natural talent and raw speed which have since defined his career.

Successive teenage triumphs in Formula Ford and Formula 3 followed and established his reputation as a driver to watch. By his early twenties, the Formula One fraternity had finally taken notice and in 1991 the Jordan team took a gamble, asking him to stand in for a jailed Bertrand Gachot at Spa. Schumacher seized the opportunity with characteristic confidence. He qualified seventh on the grid, impressing rival team Benetton so much they offered him a permanent race seat for the rest of the season.

The talent which had carried him this far now blossomed with Benetton’s backing. At the 1991 Italian Grand Prix, Schumacher finished fifth, claiming the first of four points he earned that year. The next season, he enjoyed a maiden win in Belgium, racked up 53 points and beat his more experienced team mate Martin Brundle to take third in the championship. A year later he was fourth in the championship and reigning supreme within the team.

The rest has become the stuff of history. Motivating Benetton to greatness, Schumacher became the lynch pin of a group of immensely capable people. His dedicated work ethic and passion for winning paid off with back-to-back drivers’ titles in 1994 and 1995. Just three years into his Formula One career and Schumacher was well on his way to becoming a legend.

In 1996, the world champion made a brave move. After four seasons with Benetton, he signed to Ferrari - a team which hadn’t won a championship in almost 20 years. Arriving in Maranello, Schumacher set about rejuvenating the Italian squad, attracting two of the founder members of his title-winning outfit at Benetton to join him later that year. Ross Brawn became technical director and Rory Byrne chief designer.

Schumacher’s first season at Ferrari was a trying one. Nevertheless, relying for the most part on his natural talent, he took three victories out of an under-performing car. By ‘98, things were looking more promising and he finished second overall in the title race to Mika Hakkinen. Then in 1999, Schumacher was forced to show his mettle once more after a heavy crash in Silverstone broke his leg and put paid to his title chances for another year.

It was during these early days at Ferrari, when his stakes were down, that Schumacher’s determination and obsessive dedication shone through. As a result, in 2000, everything finally slotted into place and Schumacher, after winning nine races, became the Italian team’s first world champion in 21 years. The German legend would continue winning for the next four seasons, racking up 39 victories and four further championships. He dominated the sport in a way never seen before and firmly ensconced himself in the record books.

Only in 2005, with the rise of Fernando Alonso and Renault, did that dominance begin to wane. Then, as in ’96, Schumacher’s strength of mind came to the fore, as he pushed an uncompetitive car to go faster. The result was third in the championship - five places above a team mate in identical machinery. And in 2006 Ferrari are back and fighting, revived in small part by Schumacher’s resolute ambition and refusal to lie down. Even now, at the age of 37 and heading into retirement, he is still fighting for every win.

Of course, such success rarely comes without controversy, and Schumacher has courted his fair share over the years. His first title in 1994 was tainted (and clinched) with a timely collision with the Williams of rival Damon Hill. Then in 1996, he was stripped of second place in the championship after crashing into Jacques Villeneuve - another title challenger - in Jerez. And more recently the German’s ethics have been called into question following his qualifying accident in Monaco this year.

Schumacher’s insistence on number-one status at Ferrari also drew criticism from some quarters. Eddie Irvine, Rubens Barrichello, and Felipe Massa were all compliant number twos and doubtless played a role in his success. But that cannot diminish the great on-track rivalries Schumacher enjoyed - and won - with the greats from other teams. The likes of Hill, Villeneuve, Hakkinen were all champions themselves, but in the long term none could match his all-round ability. Be it speed, natural talent, ruthlessness or hard work, Schumacher had it all. He rarely made mistakes, his prowess in the rain has been well documented, and he has become so attuned to the development of the cars he drives that he can continually adapt their set-up mid race to his advantage.

The other world champion to leave the sport this year, Jacques Villeneuve, questioned whether Schumacher’s legacy will be as long-lasting as that of Fangio, Senna or Prost. But with 90 wins, 68 pole positions, 75 fastest laps, 1354 points and those seven world titles, most would say Michael Schumacher will never be forgotten - or beaten!
 
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