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I tested this on a thirty minute run today too, and mine moves ever so slightly in the direction of the turn. I'm also pretty sure my system is well bled. The needle is always rock solid at 175, and when I put my infrared thermometer on the top of the motor where the temp sender is it always reads 195, if I recall correctly.

Just another point of info...
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Here are some photos of an unmounted cluster in three different positions. You can clearly see that the needles for temperature and oil pressure are not balanced and the baseline position will vary with g-forces.

Note that the needle moves in the opposite direction of gravity, which means in a right turn the temp will go up and on a left turn it'll go down. Interestingly the temperature gauge moves the most and the volt gauge barely moves at all.

Again Bongju, you're chasing an instrumentation problem. Drive the car and don't worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Wow, Tom. That's pretty good evidence for a centrifugal force effect. Thanks very much for taking the time to post these pictures.
 

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Here are some photos of an unmounted cluster in three different positions. You can clearly see that the needles for temperature and oil pressure are not balanced and the baseline position will vary with g-forces.

Note that the needle moves in the opposite direction of gravity, which means in a right turn the temp will go up and on a left turn it'll go down. Interestingly the temperature gauge moves the most and the volt gauge barely moves at all.

Again Bongju, you're chasing an instrumentation problem. Drive the car and don't worry about it.
power them up and then do the same test and you will see a comprehensively different result. and you never said whether all your instruments move in the same manner as your temp gage ... which they should if your assertion is correct unless all your others have the special captain kirk inertial damping system that I understand was an option that year. look... you want to believe this nonsense that's up to you... but in another light , telling someone to ignore what his instruments say is simply the worst possible advice to give anyone at any time. there are plenty of intelligent ways to determine the issue other than " drive it and if it happens to roast then you will know the answer. "

and just by the way... whats your answer for having no movement before he changed the coolant and after he has the dreaded inertial effect ? reverse polarity on his flux capacitor when he got antifreeze on it ?
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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power them up and then do the same test and you will see a comprehensively different result. and you never said whether all your instruments move in the same manner as your temp gage ... which they should if your assertion is correct unless all your others have the special captain kirk inertial damping system that I understand was an option that year.
Yeah, it'll behave a bit differently when powered, I'm sure. That doesn't change the fact that the needle isn't equally balanced around the pivot, so with constant magnetization of the coils (constant temp) you'll see some physical needle shift as the forces on the pointer change.

If you look at how the gauge works internally this should be fairly obvious. Most gauges are only designed to be accurate in one orientation.

Also, as you can see in the pic, the gauges are apparently balanced differently from each other. So I wouldn't expect them to behave exactly the same, no.

look... you want to believe this nonsense that's up to you... but in another light , telling someone to ignore what his instruments say is simply the worst possible advice to give anyone at any time. there are plenty of intelligent ways to determine the issue other than " drive it and if it happens to roast then you will know the answer. "
Well, I said if he was really concerned to verify the temperatures with an IR thermometer. But given that the car is running well and not blowing coolant or anything there doesn't appear to be any real problem.

Again, my car has does exactly the same thing for twelve years. It's running great, not overheating at all even with the A/C on, and I know there's no air in the cooling system. So what would you suggest I do? Rip the whole thing apart looking for a non-existent problem? Replace the instrument cluster?

and just by the way... whats your answer for having no movement before he changed the coolant and after he has the dreaded inertial effect ? reverse polarity on his flux capacitor when he got antifreeze on it ?
a) Dunno. Perhaps he wasn't looking for it at that time. I can tell you my car's done this for literally twelve years without change, though.

b) You're mixing your Trekkie, Planet Zircon, and Back to the Future references. That's poor form.

Seriously, I'm not sure why you want so badly for there to be a problem here. You're the only man I've met who actually trusts Alfa gauges...I mean, most of the time they're suggestions rather than rules.

Anyway, have you even TRIED this on your car? Like, really looking for it? If you have an S3/S4 cluster I'm pretty sure you'll see the needle move if you corner hard. And if you don't have an S3, how do you know what's normal so as to give advice to others?
 

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That doesn't change the fact that the needle isn't equally balanced around the pivot
So lets have a little fun. Hold the instrument cluster in front of you as it is shown in your 1st picture. Then turn to the right. Don't tilt the cluster, pivot as it would to simulate a turn in the vehicle keeping the cluster level and note the direction of the needle movement.
 
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