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What a beautiful workshop. You cannot create the character that such an old building has.
It's suites the cars well.
 

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Hubert,

What a beautiful result, a building and cars of real character. Congratulations !

Did you use a finish on the floor ?

Best regards,
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #124 (Edited)
Richard, you name it!

Thanks again for the compliments, in deed I am very happy with the complete setup. But still some work to do. The windows need attention, the ceiling now looks even uglier than before, the barn needs a new roof . . .

Don, I had an impregnation applied on top of the screed. The craftsman said it would keep liquids off the screed, but I have the impression, that it does not work the way I thought. I have been offered a top coating of 3-5 mms thickness leading to an even better surface, extremely smooth and hard-wearing. But honestly, this floor is better than everything before, so it will do.

The lift has been installed yesterday and I brought along a suction device from the company, which i will use to suck off the exhaust fumes when working on running engines, an exhaust hose has to be installed to the roof to get this working.


Hubert
 

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Hubert,

I would be careful about the floor. An impregnating sealer is only partially effective, and solvents penetrating the concrete are likely to get past it and damage the PEX heating tubes embedded in the floor. This would be an expensive problem to repair.

In my garages I had a polyaspartic coating applied, the same as is used in aircraft hangers. It is vastly better than epoxy paints, with a nice gloss that cleans very easily. After two years of use it seems very durable. The only negative is the cost, about US$ 60 per square meter professionally applied.

Best regards,
Don
 

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Wonderful workshop, but Don's right about a penetrating sealer not being adequate. You really should look into a fluid-applied industrial coating, of which there several types. The one Don used is perfect, as it's designed to resist fuel, but there are others that will also do so. They aren't cheap, but neither is repairing damage to your PEX tubing.

In any case, there are a lot of very jealous guys out here...
 

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That's it. moving back to Germany, In fact, moving in with Hubert. Did I ask where you are in Germany?

My family owned a farm with two barns on them back in Germany. One of them (For the cows) was huge (Stone foundation, wood on top) and could have made a great workshop with loft living on top of it. My family has a dairy farmer background ... I hated it as a kid, now of course, I want that property here in LA ...

Mike
 

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Hi Hubert,

Thanks for this thread, it is an inspiration for others, I have commenced on the restoration of a flaminia touring 3c that is not too rusty but has been in a bad accident more than 30 years ago. some of your photo's of the rear structure have helped me to decide how to approach the repairs.

Thanks Ian
 

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Discussion Starter #129
Soft reopening

After a long break I am approaching the Bugatti-Wagen project again. Have to find my way back to panel beating, therefore the first reports will not show very exciting things. It will take some effords to speed up work to my usual level, it is too inviting to just sit and enjoy the place.

Hubert
 

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Hubert

Good to see the latest post.

Shop looks good in the lighter colour.

+ + + +
 

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Hubert-
We are following your work with great interest. I don't know what to say other than; May the Force be with you!
 

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Discussion Starter #132
trunk floor installed

Spent some more hours on the trunk floor. Welded in the special nuts to fix the covers, fixed the vent pipe and drilled virtually hundreds of holes for spot welding. With my simple spot welder it is not possible to reach all the areas.

At last the floor is fixed by a handfull of spots now and I am quite satisfied with its look. Very close to the original.

The next step will be to put the hinges of the boot lid in place, which I do not yet have an appropriate procedure for. My former plan was to weld in the rear panel (where the trunk lock is situated) first, but maybe this would cause difficulties when mounting the boot lid later on.
 

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I just found this thread, I've read through it several times. I'm in awe of these cars and also your work. Thank you so much for sharing so much detail of this beautiful car and all your work.
 

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`61 Giulietta Spider, `65 Giulia Ti 1750, `69 GT junior 1600, `73 Spider 2000, `74 GTV 2000, `98 156
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You`ve just reminded me again of the fantastic work you do and you are not a professional restorer merely a very talented enthusiast. I would say your work is the very equal of any professional I`ve seen - although you do have an exceptional level of equiptment and workshop facilities (I`m jealous) We`ve just added another Lancia to our collecton of cars Hubert - a `63 Flavia coupe -but still on lookout for a Flaminia.
 

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Discussion Starter #135 (Edited)
Richard, congrats to the Flavia, beautiful car, refined but reliable when prepared properly.

Fixed the hinges fo the trunk lid and started adjusting it. Took the passenger side as a reference, because that is untouched so far. the left needed a lot of attention because I had not rectified the welding seams up to now.

It is unbelievable how beating at one point influences other areas. The upright area of the lid was touching the fender before I started. While planishing the upper edge, the wing end started moving finally leading to what can be seen on the pics.

Also interesting to notice that the horizontal gap at the front end of the lid does not look too good on pic 3, although the gap is very even whereas the gap on the left still needs some beats.

Hubert
 

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Its something people new to repairing, or fabricating metal don`t realise in that every blow has a ripple effect with the effect often showing some distance away from where the direct hammering is occurring as the metal is stretched, and flows. Depending on how much hammer work is being done dictates how much the piece "grows".
I admire those shut lines you`ve achieved Hubert. I`ve got to work on that with the Flavia coupe which is not "Lancia standard" at the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter #137
A few weeks ago a friend paid a momentous visit to my shop. He had been working for a high end panel beater for some years and gave some very helpful hints. One of them was that the rolls of my English Wheel could be optimized. In fact they were quite old and the bearings were damaged, too. He recommended Justin Baker, a specialist located in UK, where else. I contacted Justin, and described my project. He recommended a set of anvils (that is how he calls them), and I ordered them. At that I decided to reduce the throat of my English Wheel, because although quite heavily built, the throat of 1000 mm led to a suboptimal stiffness. The new throat now is about 600 mm and the machine feels very sturdy. It is still big enough to make a door leaf i hope.

More than that my friend taught me some tricks on finishing welding seams. Will have to incorporate them into my operation method. Well, he also sharpened my view (again) on the details, do not yet know were it will lead me. One consequence is that my tools need to be adopted to better fit the task. (See the small hammer, which i had to give a radius to)

It is getting cold outside now, time to turn back to the Bugatti-Wagen.

Hubert
 

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That gutter you show in the second photo, is the tool bit you are using on a pneumatic planisher?
The piece in the vice, how have you shrunk that to get the curve - Tucking fork, or that hammer with the now slightly curved tip ( I use one exactly like that). Very keen to hear the technique regarding weld finishing.
 

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Discussion Starter #139 (Edited)
pneumatic planisher

Richard, yes the tool bit is one of the tools for the planishing hammer. It is very usefull but is no use if you have to get away with too much material.

The curve has been made by means fo my stretcher/shrinker, in this case used the shrinking tools.

Today the upper lip of the rear boot panel has been completed. I had made the first bend before and aligned it with the strechter/shrinker as well. Made the second bend in three main steps. First I equipped my beading machine with a pair of cylindrical rolls. Then I passed the panel through the rollers step by step bending the free side. Second the lip was bent further step by step in the vice. Third the lip was corrected in the stretcher/shrinker. Part of the stretch resulting from step one and two had be removed.

(pics partially belong to next text)
 

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Discussion Starter #140 (Edited)
Welding finishing

The experts will now say, ah yes, no news, only basics. But still if not new for me, I forgot a lot and had to call back to my mind.

First my friend told me to use the body file for identification of uneven spots. See pics one and three above this article. The marked areas (e.g. yellow circle and black arrows) are too low, need to be planished from back side. If you did not work accurate enough before, which is the case with the shown part, insanity will spread in your brain.

Second, trim the two panels so that they fit without gap. Easily said! I paid very much attention to this point, when trimming the upper lip and the main panel, also avoided corners, cut round curves instead. (see pic).

Weld without rod, avoid additional material by all means! Weld in short sections (i went for 5 to 10 cms) and rectify these sections immediately while the material is still hot.

My intellect absorbed these hints like a sponge and then I started putting the two pieces together. Spot welded them first (made first mistake I think, should have made more spots).

At the beginning it worked as it should, I interrupted welding and hammered the seam, resulting an an even distortionfree area. But after about half the distance, I lost track. Instead of flowing together the two edges starting moving away from each other as soon as I approached the flame to them. Had to stop in short intervals to hammer the edges in position again and had to use some wire to fill. Finally the result was still quite a progress compared to other welds I have made, but it is not totally clear to me why the second half of the weld caused so many problems. Maybe my concentration went down, and I missed the perfect position of the welder, I don´t know.
 

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