Alfa Romeo Forums banner

201 - 220 of 605 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
What a great thread. I have really enjoyed the time reading and learning on this one.

I have a customer with a Flaminia PF Coupe and besides being a gorgeous elegant car it is an absolute joy to drive. I wish Alfa had studied the shifting mechanism on these for their 116 transaxle cars because the lancia shift so much better.

The level of bodywork shown on this thread is incredible and I can only aspire to do this level of work. Thank you for showing it.

Kevin
 

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #203 (Edited)
Today´s goal was to get the side panels of the left wing in place (welded, rectified, planished etc). But a friend showed up, declaring "happy hour at "The Farm"". Interrupted work, swapped the torch by the fridge and had a good time.

Not bad at all!

Hubert
 

Attachments

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #204 (Edited)
In post 151 you could see a round table with a steel tableplate. There are various pyramidal holes in it to take up small anvils. This table turned out to be too low for my purposes, at least it is not ergonomic, as my back tells me. Fixing the anvils in the vise has some disadvantages as well. The pyramidal shafts do not like to be gripped in the vise and the workbench itself is in the way.

It was time to do some reverse engineering again, this time based on a photo of the Touring Superleggera workshop of the 1930s. I spotted a stand to take up shaping tools next to some Touring "Flying Star" bodyshell.

Milled a pyramidal seat into a small steel block, which then was fixed on a stand. Using the anvils is much more convenient now.

Hubert
 

Attachments

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #205
Does anyone have an idea about the purpose of the panel shown in pic1?

Small issues can keep you busy. The left wing was still missing the foglight support and the holes for the indicator. The old panel around the foglight is extremely thin, think it has been treated too many times (in the factory, when repairing the crash, and finally my work), you can feel that it has to be left as is, but work is finished in this place.

A pattern made out of paper served to mark the position of the three holes for the left indicator. When drilling the small holes and cutting the big one, I missed one position, so the indicator won´t fit. Had to file the small holes oval in order to get it fit. Should have been more cautious and more concentrated!!! The correct way would have been to make a pattern out of metal and use that, or . . .
 

Attachments

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #206 (Edited)
. . . use the old part as a template. That worked much better. The big bore was made by means of a standard bore puncher. These are quite expensive as you need one for every diameter you want to make. The one I used here is about 60 Euro, but the more holes you cut, the cheaper they get.

What makes me want to cry is that the right wing has rust holes around the main light. Will this ever come to an end?

The plan originally was to save the wheel house and only make a new connection panel to the wing but the overlapping area was to corroded. All the same as on the left side.

Hubert
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,944 Posts
When you find more rust, just think back and pat yourself on the back at all the good work you have already done and how must rust you have removed :)

The quality of your work is as good as I have ever seen.
Pete
 

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #208
Thanks for your support, Pete. The plan is to complete the panel work this winter.

Hubert
 

·
Registered
`61 Giulietta Spider, `65 Giulia Ti 1750, `69 GT junior 1600, `73 Spider 2000, `74 GTV 2000, `98 156
Joined
·
1,855 Posts
Hubert I`m surprised to hear you say you weren`t expecting rust around that headlight area. From what I`ve seen that car would have been abandoned as a cause too great and ended up in the crusher. It appeared to be one extremely rusty car and only one with great patience and craftsmanship, such as yourself, would even contemplate it. There is rust everywhere on that car - everywhere you haven`t been that is. Do what I do if the enthusiasm wanes - walk away from it for a while. I like you have several other cars I can drive or work on if I still feel like a classic car fix, otherwise I just go for a walk or watch television. Remember you are moving forward.
 

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #210
Richard, i dealt with other tasks (that´s the reason why it so quiet here) now it´s panel beating time again and I am well motivated. These small rust holes do not scare me. The idea of this diary is not only to describe the technical and manual side of this restoration, showing the emotional ups and downs and talking about other things, like the JBL speakers or shop renovation make the passion that drives me doing all these things more vivid.

Subsequent project steps are under consideration; I could do the upholstery(see the Flavia pic) while the body is at the paint shop, or the engine . . .

Hubert

BTW: There is a refreshed gearbox waiting for the GT, a new set of pistons and liners waiting for the Flavia and new suspension components waiting for the Fulvia, a new radiator has just been fitted to the A112.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
`61 Giulietta Spider, `65 Giulia Ti 1750, `69 GT junior 1600, `73 Spider 2000, `74 GTV 2000, `98 156
Joined
·
1,855 Posts
Wow that car and the transaxle are gorgeous. It must seem pretty sad really when ones gets pleasure from just looking at mechanical components such as a gearbox but it gives me as much pleasure as driving the car. The Flavia from that angle looks so subtle in style and I love the colour combination. I have to admit of the Flavia variations it would be my least favourite but yours with those colours has style. Still think the Pininfarina Coupe though is best (I`m biased).
People forget the difficult parts and the emotional highs and lows of a restoration - I`m glad you recorded yours. As I, and others have said before, you are a source of inspiration to us all.
 

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #212 (Edited)
Todays achievements and although the winter has arrived, no thermometers dropping below zero in the shop any more. Have to admit that I do not miss that.

No cleaning or finishing of the weld yet, but things fit together well, not much distorsion (?) in the panels.

Hubert
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hubert,

What a great and inspiring project!
Since a couple of months I own a Flaminia coupe 3b myself and right now i'm busy working on the car to get it on the road this summer.
Your topic is a great source of information for me!

The inner front fenders of my car have a very rough, hammered, surface. I thought this could be an old repair after a minor collision. The subframe however looks straight.
In your pictures i see the exact same rough surface.
Do you have an explanation for this? It does not suit the high quality standards of Lancia at that time in my opinion.
 

Attachments

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #214
My explanation is, that they were using Flaminia Berlina panels and the air intakes as well, which did not fit in combination with the lower PF fender. So they played it simple "lowering" the inner fenders by a few beats with a big hammer. As far as I can see, that was done on all PF coupés.

Hubert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,207 Posts
This is a good example of the not so discrete "ironmongery" workshop practices of period Italian coachwork. Underneath the elegant body designs one could often find some very rough-and-ready fabrication techniques. The difference between Italian methods and German or British methods could often be striking. Under the svelte lines and lush paint, the bodies of famous Italian cars were usually quite rough. I remember finding this grotty, porous filler on a 1900 Alfa. It had the consistency of cement and was surprisingly thick. I was shocked, shocked . . . 0:)
 

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #217
Tempus fugit

Right inner fender in place, fender quite nicely aligned to the rest. Had a look at the passenger door at this occasion. The frame will need partial replacement, no prob. But there is a substantial loss of material from the inside at the door handle area, where the door blade is round. Deep dents of corrosion and sandblasting. (Forgot to take pics of that, next time)

Hubert
 

Attachments

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #218 (Edited)
Snippets

Sourced a rubber band for the English Wheel, this gives you much more bend and much less stretch when running a panel through it.

Took a picture of the rough surface of the door blade.

Found some examples for welding carried out at PF, with deep love to the work:surprise:
(Have found some pics of ugly mods on the Touring bodies as well)

Started on the production of a handfull of "box nuts". Square nuts are available but the boxes are not, aren´t they?

The bead roller is showing more and more of its capabilities, mainly on youtube not in my shop, i admit. Mine is the most simple version of all (I bought it 25 years ago and still remember the disappointment when making the first beads with it. This resulting in not using it for two decades). Besides lack of practice, which I am now overcoming, the manual crank was identified as a limiting factor.

As this body restoration is slowly heading to its end, buying a state of the art 5k USD item is not the way to go, but equipping the old mule with an electric drive sounds good to me. And I am not going to use an old garage door drive, nor mums worn out Kitchen Aid. Will report about it.

Hubert
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,998 Posts
Hubert,

You need to look for 'cage nuts'. There are various styles, although you seem to be 50% of the way to creating your own!
 

·
improving
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #220 (Edited)
Alex,

thanks for your hint. I have been looking for the German equivalent (Käfigmutter= cage nut, Kastenmutter) and have found a couple of standards, but none of them was similar to the original ones. Even more, the nowadays square nuts (also according to DIN standards) are different to the old ones. Long story short, I made some square nuts of the correct size and bent the cages from the panels i had prepared. they are not good enough for the next Mars mission, but will serve the purpose.

Fixed the missing takeup of the tank and made two takeups for the rear bumper and welded them in.

A reference Flaminia has arrived in the shop, too.

Equipment: sourced some devices to do surface upgrades (grinding) and ordered a state of the art bead roller in the USA (changed my mind). The lead time for this is about four to five weeks, I am so impatient!!!!! Perhaps the drive originally dedicated to the old bead roller will find a new application.

Hubert
 

Attachments

201 - 220 of 605 Posts
Top