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Discussion Starter #381 (Edited)
And the Flaminia waits patiently ;)

Pete
Her time will return . . .

after the Flavia engine of my buddy Thomas is done and installed and the Flaminia engine of my buddy Christian is done and installed and the snow plough of the MOG is put back together and the gantry crane is erected in the barn. Did i miss anything? A yes, my wife and daughter. And there was something . . . how was it called? Job, I think was the word.

:balloon:

PS: I appreciate very much that you all let me talk off topic!
 

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Discussion Starter #383 (Edited)
Chain hoist

Blast cleaned the parts where applicable, degreased and mechanically cleaned the rest. Painted the components (not happy with the color, should have taken the darker blue for it), greased the bearings and the teeth, put it all together, except the load chain, which I forgot in the company.

The design is simple and bullet proof. The planetary gear has a ratio of 1:8,3. Added the ratio of the diameter difference between drag wheel and load wheel, which I forgot to measure but estimate with 1:2, we have a total of 1:16. Even weak people like me can pull 500kg easily with it.:laugh2:

The hold and release mechanism is really simple, there is the ratchet making such a confidence inspiring clicking sound and the clutch pads (one of them, the brown disk, to be seen in one of the pics) attach and release so defined. It is gorgeous for an almost seventy years old device.

It radiates much more confidence than an Asian item nominating five times the load.











And this is Tommy´s Flavia, which actually is my first restoration and my wedding coach. BTW, the camera is ok, but the clouds hang low.



Hubert
 

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Discussion Starter #386 (Edited)
Main light relays

The main lights are actuated through a single relaybox. Inside there are three relays, one of them operating as a toggle switch for changing from low to high beam. Interesting layout, as the toggling is achieved mechanically using a finger that hits a kind of ratchet. This mechanism is not very reliable nowadays. Hence time for something new. Frequently the solenoids break and quite often some of the riveted contacts fail as well.

Some time ago I built a small machine for rewinding the solenoids. It was equipped with a counter for making the exact number of winds.
This is very labor intensive and the winding machine got lost somewhere.

The first idea was to replace the toggle relay by something fitting in the original box to keep the original look. After the prototype of the electronic toggle switch was finished on a small board, I thought it might be a good thing to replace the other two relays as well.

A suitable circuit board was cut and some preparations made to make it fit inside the box. The free space on the left will take up the components for the toggle switch.





The relay on the right has a new coil.



worn components



toggle prototype





Needs completion

Hubert
 

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Excellent work as usual, Hubert, but this time I admit mixed feelings.

I've struggled with a similar issue on Aurelias. The voltage regulator is delicate, if I can put it that way. Several electronic conversions have been made over the years, with varying results (some have had overheating issues, and burned up the generator in the process). At this point I am (gingerly) running an original unit, but am always hoping for an improved one in an original case.

But I have always been particularly enamored of this little electro-mechanical device (though I confess that having had no issues myself, perhaps my reluctance is not justified). I've opened these up just to show others, even long time Lancisti who were unaware of this near anachronism. It just seems a shame to lose it, but reliability and safety do come first.
 

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Discussion Starter #388 (Edited)
Excellent work as usual, Hubert, but this time I admit mixed feelings.

I've struggled with a similar issue on Aurelias. The voltage regulator is delicate, if I can put it that way. Several electronic conversions have been made over the years, with varying results (some have had overheating issues, and burned up the generator in the process). At this point I am (gingerly) running an original unit, but am always hoping for an improved one in an original case.

But I have always been particularly enamored of this little electro-mechanical device (though I confess that having had no issues myself, perhaps my reluctance is not justified). I've opened these up just to show others, even long time Lancisti who were unaware of this near anachronism. It just seems a shame to lose it, but reliability and safety do come first.
I am absolutely with you regarding the electro-mechanical devices and I keep them as long as possible, just because I love mechanical things and the fact, that you can repair them (to a certain extend).

The reason for the ongoing conversion is that this particular one is beyond restoration. It passed a serious "melt down". the springs got blue, the coil bodies burnt and deformed. Furthermore there are some originals left (including a brand new one), two of them I restored as decribed above. But when you do not use them frequently, they start getting unreliable basically failing during the biennial technical inspection:frown2:

Besides this there were several inquiries of Flaminia and Flavia owners about how to fix these. This is my attempt to do so.

Hubert
 

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interesting. in the industrial control systems i build, we sometimes use mechanical ratcheting relays. i find them quite reliable actually. mind you, these are typically sealed so don't get much contamination, but they can solve problems if i don't have the right software to get into someone else's control system, or if i just need a simple holding output from a single input.
what would be the current carrying capacity of the relays you have installed on the breadboard?
 

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Discussion Starter #390 (Edited)
Brian,

the main issue is that the actuating arm does not come back and therefore blocks the operation. Another thing is that the four toothed sprocket sits on a shaft that has a square area. This is pressed by a pair of leaf springs. I suppose that the intention is to let the shaft turn 90 degrees on every hit by the actuator. It happens that the shaft sticks in an uncomplete move and the relay stops working. It may get loose again, if you keep on pushing the high beam button on and on, but that is what I mean by not reliable. (Sorry for my poor explanation, the mechanism is quite complicated and i am missing the correct vocabulary, best would be to shoot some macro pics and show, or a video maybe?)

The relays are good for 16A 250VAC.

Hubert
 

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Discussion Starter #391 (Edited)
Here is the promised video


The double cams at the right form the electricl contact in combination with the leaf spring.

Hubert
 

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i love it! but i do see how easily it would become unreliable. the ratcheting relays i am more familiar with have a very similar arrangement.
the lancia version has a very powerful coil, i bet if everything isn't lined up exactly right and lubed properly it could bend that assembly out of shape very easily.

here's an example of what i use. but the current load is far less than the relays you have there.
G4Q Ratchet Relay/Dimensions | OMRON Industrial Automation
 

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Discussion Starter #393
Merry Christmas

While the Christmas tree is being decorated upstairs i had to seek shelter in the cellar after offering my help>:).

The relay conversion is completed and besides the hopefully gained plus in reliability there are other absolutely noteworthy side effects. First of all the power consumption has gone down from 1,2 A peak to 35 mA. This will let the lights shine more brightly and the ignition spark even better!!!

Second the conversion reduces the overall weight of the car by spectacular 0,275 kg. This boosts the power to weight ratio from 9,714 kg/hp to a breath taking 9,711 kg/hp (based on GT 3C, 140 hp). Using the now even faster reacting high beam you simply wipe everybody off the left lane on the Autobahn.

Merry Christmas and good wishes for the New Year!



components to be restored



fairly clean upstairs



same downstairs






Hubert
 

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Very, very interesting improvement in power/weight ratio! So, maybe you should bring it to Bonneville next summer?

And definitely more exciting than dissecting the Spiders' ignition switch to find the broken contact.

Speaking of Christmas decorations and letting those that do something well do it better without our "help", here's the stocking I "helped" my wife make...

Happy Motoring to us all!!
 

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Hello Hubert,
I follow with Interest the Work Steps of your Flaminia.
I am impressed by your Precision and Perfection in Detail.
A real extreme Project.
BR
BP
 

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Discussion Starter #397 (Edited)
The right rear fender had been fixed only provisional to the body. There was some mismatch regarding the lower rear corner and the rhd gap which I was not sure how to solve. The gap was close to zero while at the other side it was ok.

Spend some time on thinking. Finally decided to go for my human double stamp press in order to widen the trunk a little bit. (I am not playing with my phone but operating the camera via wifi)



The result was surprising. On the left(!) a 12mm long weld broke, releasing some internal tension on the whole rear assembly.



After that it was easy to fix the rhd fender correctly achieving an even gap all around and redoing the cracked weld. The boot lid will require some fine tuning nonetheless.



The passenger side door skin is waiting to be mated to the door frame, but the next thing to be addressed is the floor panel shown.





Hubert
 

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Discussion Starter #398 (Edited)
Happy New Year

It still is Dec 31st over here, the right time to prepare for 2019. Traditionally you should not leave things undone over the night of New Years Eve. In this case the motivation is different. As had been remarked before the Flaminia has been waiting for my care for quite a while and I wanted her to enter the new year “in progress” rather than “sitting in the corner”.

The plan was to open up all the different kinds of welds (plugs, spots, worms) and then more or less take the panel out without further damage. Wanted to put up for discussion whether I should try to repair the panel (partial replacements) or make a new one. Even thought of discussing if to try make it out of one piece.



There were some hidden welds preventing my original idea. Instead I crookedly sat inside the shell trying to tear the panel out after I had opened all visible welds with various grinding equipment, which by the way enabled the removal at all. An angle grinder alone would not have done the job. Three hours later it was out.



tear drop welding, the method to go?





Note the different types of reinforcements and the sand.



Now here it is, massively creased, but partially salvable if necessary. When did you ever have a look that deep inside a Flaminia´s bones?
Amazing how solid this part of the shell is!



Happy motoring and a peaceful 2019 to all!

Hubert
 

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Discussion Starter #399
Can pulling

Today I did some work on engine 823.00 1339. In order to get the liners pulled, I welded a 30°-support which can be fixed to the work bench by a pair of c-clamps.

Fastened this way, I could use a 2 m long tube to extend the rod shown in the pics. Easy job!

When doing some cleaning close to one of the seats a hole appeared, which I am not a hundred percent sure what it is meant for. It is a drilled hole, produced by purpose.

Thought it might be a drain hole to drain this side of the block when draining the cooling liquid. But where does it lead?











Hubert
 

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Amazing how good the structure under the floor panel looked. Would have expected it to rust from the bottom up, but the lower pieces look good.

Mark
 
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