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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I want to fit 2l brakes and uprights to my 1972 1600 Super for that little bit of extra braking at trackdays.
Can I use all my 1600 stuff (hubs, bearings,...) and just mount it on the 2l spindles. Of course by using the 2l calipers and discs.
Just want to know if it's enough to source some 2l uprights or if there are some more 2l parts needed.
Calipers and discs will be bought new
 

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Just want to know if it's enough to source some 2l uprights or if there are some more 2l parts needed.
A few more bits & pieces would be useful. Here's what I can think of:

- The two circular dust shields that cover the inner side of the disks, and the associated hardware to mount them.

- The brackets that secure the flexible brake lines at their connection to those short, "S" shaped rigid lines which goes to the calipers. And the "S" shaped lines.

- The large bolts (10mm?) that secure the calipers to the uprights. Or are those the same as the corresponding bolts for the Girling calipers you'll be replacing?

- Can anyone confirm that the hubs are the same for ATE-braked and Girling-braked cars? That is, will ATE compatible disks just bolt onto the earlier hubs?
 

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Take everything on the 2000 upright/spindle from upper to lower ball joint and bolt and bolt to the Super's upper and lower A-arms. Might need adjustable A-arms to get camber right, depending on your stock upper arms.

I just did this on a 65 TI, which has two-bolt suspension, not like four-bolt which yours probably has.

Andrew
 

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I don't know exactly which years are involved but some of the earlier uprights have the correct mounting hole spacing for Milano Brembo calipers. I have a modified pair on my 79 Spider.
 

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My 71 Super, which come with the small late 1600 brakes (same caliper as earlier cars, but different disk, like a Junior) had Milano calipers on it when I got it.

I don't personally see the need for bigger brakes. I run my 71 Super in vintage racing with stock brakes and strongish 1600 and have not yet used up the brakes. I can't imagine you could on the street unless coasting down from Donner Summit or Pikes Peak with a trailer behind, in neutral. Just my experience.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, there might be way more parts needed then. Because I can source uprights really easily, but to find complete ones with everything attached is quite hard.
Someone has the measures for the small and large ATE mounting holes. And also for the Brembos? Might be an option too.
 

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My 71 Super, which come with the small late 1600 brakes (same caliper as earlier cars, but different disk, like a Junior) had Milano calipers on it when I got it.

I don't personally see the need for bigger brakes. I run my 71 Super in vintage racing with stock brakes and strongish 1600 and have not yet used up the brakes. I can't imagine you could on the street unless coasting down from Donner Summit or Pikes Peak with a trailer behind, in neutral. Just my experience.

Andrew
Curious, then why did Alfa upgrade to bigger front brakes with the 1750's (and beyond). they were not much if any heavier at all. And if you say "bigger engine", then that makes the case that cars with swapped bigger or hotter engines needs bigger front brakes. We usually say Alfa engineers know what they were doing.
 

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Yeah, it's not a bad thing, I just don't think it's an essential thing. Like I say, I haven't run out of brakes yet on the track. I did early on in my 2000 GTV (big brakes), but I was overdriving in those days.

Andrew
 

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The aluminum Brembo's are also lighter than the stock Spider calipers and that is unsprung weight.
 

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The switch to ATE from Dunlops came in mid 1966. Also Alfa changed the valve guides at this time also. The Dunlps were awesome brakes and could really put on the stop when needed. However they were prone to rusting of the pistons to the bore. So over time braking became harder to stop to where you needed both feet to push the pedal to make it stop. Worst case would be one would freze and the other would grab and you get a violent pull one direction. That will freak you out. The ATE's didn't have that issue so Alfa swapped over. They also dumped the dual brake master cylinders for the single ATE booster unit in 1970-71. This is most likely a time when the 2 liter and more power probably necessitated a larger swept brake area for keeping in line for DOT standards. Just my 2 cents.:)
 

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I've done panic stops at 80 mph in the '65 with Dunlops. Slight pull right then. Had them reworked and pull straight now. Minor issue is adjusting the rears (invented by Rube Goldberg himself), The Y'urps say the fronts are prone to corrosion in wet climes that causes the corrosion between caliper and piston.
 
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