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Discussion Starter #1
Took my '82 GTV6 out yesterday for it's first drive in a couple years. Started and drove fine, but I noticed that every now and then the clutch would go to the floor with what appeared to be no pressure. Applied it again and worked fine. This occurred about 2 or 3 times over the course of several miles and about 40-50 clutch applications. Tested it this morning and good pressure, while sitting in the garage. Plenty of fluid, no apparent leaks.
Problem two, while on the same ride, brakes seemed fine at first but after a few miles pedal seemed to be getting a bit soft. Again, plenty of fluid and no apparent leaks. I did notice what sounded like a bit of a scraping sound while driving past a fence or wall. Not sure where it was from but assumed it might have been a light rust coating on the rotors wearing off. When I got back after about 10 minutes at rest the rotor temps were RF 108*, LF 115*. RR 183* and LR 231* !!. I know the exhaust is just above that LR caliper/rotor but the temps at the back seemed a bit high.
Never had any brake issues with this car and not quite sure of a good plan of action to identify and correct the problem. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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When is the last time you bled those 2 systems?
 

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If you haven't done it already, first thing I suggest is to flush new brake fluid through the systems. If you are careful to never let the reservoir run dry you will not introduce any air. Normal brake fluid is hygroscopic - it absorbs H2O. As it gets old the amount of absorbed moisture degrades its performance and lowers its boiling point. And the moisture can allow internal corrosion.

Make sure it is not silicone brake fluid (DOT 5). Silicone is usually tinted purple, normal brake fluid (DOT 3 & DOT 4) is clear/amber. Assuming it is normal brake fluid, I suggest DOT 4 - it has a higher boiling point and doesn't cost a lot more than DOT 3. Just don't mix DOT 3/4 & DOT 5. A quart should be sufficient for a thorough flush. Note that the label on DOT 4 may say "synthetic". I think that is just marketing hype - all brake fluids are synthetic.
 

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The bleeding has been discussed, and you should do it for both clutch and brakes. Installing Speed Bleeders makes it a lot easier. Now, as for the disc temperature, as long as the car rolls freely in neutral on a slight grade, if it doesn't feel like that brake is dragging, I think that temp differential is reasonable given the location of that exhaust there.

BTW.. lube the e-brake linkage under there, and exercise the brake lever. Based on our experience, the more you neglect to use the emergency brake, the worse it functions.
 

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Richard Jemison
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Do the brake flush with DOT 4. But the Rubegoldberg parking brakes on transaxle cars can be a big problem. All that metal for the parking brakes in the piston reservoirs tremendously increases fluid temps and causes fluid boil/vaporization and a spongey petal.
Solution for us that drive transaxle "race" cars is swapping the stock version to the Spider rear calipers. No parking brake, but we don`t need them.

Adjusting the factory rear brakes can be difficult. Read the manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As always, AlfaBB to the rescue. Thanks Gents for the quick replies. As far as I can remember the brakes were last flushed and bled back sometime during the late Pleistocene era. I will do that first. I had picked up a Motive Power Bleed a while back for another project, but never used it. Think I may give that a try.
The handbrake hasn't been attached since I pulled the rear end a few years ago. Interesting idea about those Spider rear calipers as I'm sure I've got some around somewhere in the stash.
Think what I might do is try the roll on an incline test both before and after a drive. See if there is any difference. From what I've read I really would rather not get involved with setting the caliper clearances if possible.
 

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Nothing to lose by doing a flush first.

I always empty the master cylinders with a turkey baster first. Fill with fresh fluid, then bleed. No need to suck any more crappy fluid through the system than necessary.

I've had many cars that sat for waaaay more than 2 years. Like 16....
Flush and bleed. Still driving them. Nothing will be "dried out" if the system had brake fluid in it.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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I don’t know if just flushing will work. Given that it wasn’t used for two years, it might be that the slaves dried out.
This. If the clutch pedal is intermittently going to the floor with no pressure, likely either your MC or slave seals are shot. Bleeding isn't going to fix that.
 

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This. If the clutch pedal is intermittently going to the floor with no pressure, likely either your MC or slave seals are shot. Bleeding isn't going to fix that.
In the interest of science and automotive experiments, let's try just flush and bleed and see what happens.
Worst case? The system will be clean when new parts are installed. Inquiring minds want to know.
 

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If you have to park on an incline, as many of us have to in our DD, the parking brake is essential. Granted, they may not be all that great, but kept in working order, they can eliminate some grief, such as car damage, or much worse, getting killed by the rolling car. Just read an obit this morning in the local paper about a guy who died just because of that. Got out of his car to get something out of the back seat, the car rolled back and ran over him.

Don't ask how we know this but will say that it is fun to watch a car creep down a sloped driveway as the engine ever so slowly turns over, regardless of which gear it is in. We learn through experience, lol, that it is not fun when it T-bones a garage door.

As for having the clutch pedal go to the floor, had that happen with the LS in a SF hotel parking lot. Bled the system in the parking lot, and it was fine after that. It was evidently a piece of crud under a seal, and once cleared, all was well. Needless to say, rebuilt everything, with new fluid, after we returned home.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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In the interest of science and automotive experiments, let's try just flush and bleed and see what happens.
Worst case? The system will be clean when new parts are installed. Inquiring minds want to know.
Yeah, it'll be great practice for when he bleeds the system a couple days later after installing the new hydraulics :LOL:
 

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One thing I do when flushing or bleeding an old system. Put a piece of 2x4 under the brake pedal so it cannot go to the floor. Each pedal stroke will be shorter so it will take a little longer to flush/bleed but it will prevent the MC seals from going into 'uncharted territory'. There can be a bit of grunge or crud down there - not pushing the MC seals across/through that seems like a good idea.
 

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I will say this you're going to love that Motive Power brake bleeder. And if you order some speed bleeders and get them put in before you do the job it'll be even easier.
 

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Don’t forget to lubricate the clutch pivot, won’t solve your hydraulics but the clutch action will be smoother and prevent the dreaded broken pivot.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
OK, bit of an update. Ran the car over the same course as yesterday. No clutch issues, but the doubt is there so I'll probably do an MC rebuild this summer. Brake started out firm, but by end of the trip (only 20 min) was really getting soft and needed to be pumped up to stop. Put the car on about a 10* incline and it rolled freely when cold and about the same after returning. Rotor temps were about 115* front, RR 213* while LR was about 400* taken just after returning.
Plan for now will be to get some speed bleeders, have a fresh can of Valvoline DOT 3/4 and use the Motive power bleeder. Also new pads.
Which brings me to a couple questions, which pads do you gentlemen, and I use that term loosely, recommend? And, what would you suggest as a good readily available shop manual?
Again, thanks for taking the time to help me out.
 

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Use the ATE 200 fluid for high temps. Those stated brake temps are weird and unbalanced.
 

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I will say this you're going to love that Motive Power brake bleeder. And if you order some speed bleeders and get them put in before you do the job it'll be even easier.
Exactly. I used the Motive Power Bleeder for the first time last year and thought how stupid I’ve been all these years. It’s so freakin easy to bleed the brakes and clutch now its ridiculous. Highly recommend.
 
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