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On the subject of Lightweights, this thread was started in 2008, but bumped back to life by Luca 5 days ago.

It's taken a massive 3327 views thus far, not bad for a thread that is only #22 posts long, it really does show the intense interest that the now near mythical Lightweight's do generate.

Luca - I've found another couple of cars with grey engine bays - still working on this to try & identify when & where & which body colours got the grey engine bay

Still looking for as many chassis numbers as I can get, lots of Lightweights still in Europe and many went to Japan in the '80's.

Ciao
Greig

750B's
750D's
750E
10102's
10103's
10109
 

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On the subject of Lightweights, this thread was started in 2008, but bumped back to life by Luca 5 days ago.

It's taken a massive 3327 views thus far, not bad for a thread that is only #22 posts long, it really does show the intense interest that the now near mythical Lightweight's do generate.


Still looking for as many chassis numbers as I can get, lots of Lightweights still in Europe and many went to Japan in the '80's.

Ciao
Greig
Though nothing like the interest in tool rolls (18,539 views)!

It seems like s number of the cars that went to Japan are drifting back across the pond.

One just changed hands in this area.
 

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I got lucky one day and got to see 3 lightweights in one place. Some interviewing and research later, I wrote an article that has been printed in Alfa Publications in England and the US. This Version is from the Giuliettaletta some years ago.
I think Greig can correct me in places on details, but Light weights do exist and yes they are very special. They were also fragile. The Aluminum panels are a problem both because they are dead soft, but also because they grow when hot on a warm day. The rear shock mounts are another weak spot, throughout production of the Sprint Alfa kept reinforcing the area to make it more durable. I would always check old Sprints for stress cracks around the upper shock mount. It gets exciting when the shock pulls through the hole and the rear end goes south!
Attached is my article on the 3 light weights I visited at the Portland Historic Races.
Bill Gillham
 

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Greig....you are my hero!
Hello Greig,

I read your numerous posts with subject the Giulietta Alleggerita and I felt you're the one to contact to see if you could enlight me with my own car's history. Old English Alfisti should be in first row here too as it may be any of them attended or even took part to some races decades ago.
For instance my father is still vividly remembering he saw and felt in love with a red alleggerita in a showroom here in Geneva- Switzerland and this was 1958 !

He had the money to buy it but my parents were about to move into a bigger flat and my mother told him he was better to think about that then buying a sportcar !

He didn't take a picture of that glanzing Giulietta what I truly regret !

I'm presently restoring a 750E sprint Alleggerita of 1957 namely Vin #1493.03948 officially produced on June 25 1957 and imported into the UK as a new car through Thomson&Taylor.

I bought that car some 7 years ago in a castle near Dublin Irland from the estate of the late owner, Mr Humphries. This gentleman had bought the car in 1974 if I properly read the original logbook .

The car was then registered under TJW 555 in Wolverhampton and should have been 8595FM in Coventry right before. It then became 27 IIK once re-registered in Ireland.

Car was complete exept for the bumpers but all in all it showed up somewhat neglected for itself.

Restoration was not a priority for me at that time but I was happy to locate and secure an original alleggerita
as I had been unsuccessful to buy a pretty good one in the early 80s for something like 3000 Swiss !!!
I don't even remember if I already had my driver licence at that time but I knew I wanted one !

After the car was put to its bare bones I understood it would take quite a long time until the car would be put back to original condition ! Rust, battered body panel, worn out mechanical components !!!

At least everything was there !

I attached some pictures to the present post showing the car when registered under TJW 555 in around 1974, then with its Irish number 27 IIK and at the time I bought it.

It seems Mr Humphries did race it extensively along the 70's but Mme Humphries, though a most charming and helpful lady, never came back with any good picture showing the car in action.

What I'm trying to find at most, is a picture showing the little Giulietta when new as, according to what you said, alleggeritas were a rare sight in the 50's around the UK.

A clue is maybe this TLA 955 once framed, back in 1957, at Goodwood.
My own car having been TJW 555 later on ??? Who knows if we speak about the same car here but its pure speculation I must say !

Who can help ? Did anybody remember of my car amongst the old English Alfisti ?

Let's see if luck is on my side with that story?

With kind regards,

Marc
alfa giulietta sprint veloce Humphries 1974 (76).JPG
alfa giulietta sprint veloce  Ireland    (20).jpg
alfa giulietta sprint veloce  Ireland    (22).jpg
alfa giulietta sprint veloce Irelande    (83).JPG






1630487






 

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Sometimes looking for the 10th time at the same picture brings some interesting clues !
I'll have a look on my own car
1630490
to see whether it had a hole in the right front fender or not !
 

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I am finishing the restoration of a very early 1957 Sprint with the same rear tail lights and small headlights. The car is not a Veloce.
 

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On the subject of Lightweights, this thread was started in 2008, but bumped back to life by Luca 5 days ago.

It's taken a massive 3327 views thus far, not bad for a thread that is only #22 posts long, it really does show the intense interest that the now near mythical Lightweight's do generate.

Luca - I've found another couple of cars with grey engine bays - still working on this to try & identify when & where & which body colours got the grey engine bay

Still looking for as many chassis numbers as I can get, lots of Lightweights still in Europe and many went to Japan in the '80's.

Ciao
Greig

750B's
750D's
750E
10102's
10103's
10109
Dear Greig,

I wrongly replyed to Alfazagato Yesterday evening but in truth my post was/should have been directed to you.
Did you read it ?
Cordiali Saluti,

Marc
 

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In 2008 John Colley wrote to me that SVA #03948 was sold 19570625 by Thomson & Taylor to Carfox ("Autovox" was my mistake). So 19570625 was the sales date in the UK and not the recorded production date by Alfa Romeo. T&T had recorded their cars on a list which later was available for the British AROC members. A quick search in the WWW shows that Dermot S. Humphries owned a 1956 Sprint750B and a 1963 GiuliaTI in 1970 and participated in hill-climbs with the TI (see:Letters from readers, October 1970 - Motor Sport Magazine). He was son to an Irish politician and passed away 20110611-12 in his sleep at home in Dromin House. John Colley further wrote in 2008 that Humphries was owner of your car in the 1970s and later sold it to John Dooley who resold it elsewhere (USA?). Since you have had purchased the car from the Humphries' estate, this was the 750B or another car that was owned by Dooley. For further research it is necessary to know production and sales dates from Alfa Romeo records, the Bertone body number and the number of the engine as well as the precise dates from the logbook. TLA 955 might have been SVA #02609
 

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Didn't Zagato convert SV's into SZ's?

Pete
 

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From 1956 to 1959 Zagato rebodied about 20 Giuliettas to a Sprint Veloce Zagato SVZ. Most of them were first series Sprint Veloces SVA before. The SZ was built from 1960-1963 on new chassis delivered by Alfa Romeo. A single Giulietta SS is known to have been converted, a second one and a Giulietta Spider claims it but I have seen no evidence for this. A few SZs were converted to the later Coda Tronca version SZT after accidents.
 

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In 2008 John Colley wrote to me that SVA #03948 was sold 19570625 by Thomson & Taylor to Autovox. So 19570625 was the sales date in the UK and not the recorded production date by Alfa Romeo. T&T had recorded their cars on a list which later was available for the British AROC members. A quick search in the WWW shows that Dermot S. Humphries owned a 1956 Sprint750B and a 1963 GiuliaTI in 1970 and participated in hill-climbs with the TI (see:Letters from readers, October 1970 - Motor Sport Magazine). He was son to an Irish politician and passed away 20110611-12 in his sleep at home in Dromin House. John Colley further wrote in 2008 that Humphries was owner of your car in the 1970s and later sold it to John Dooley who resold it elsewhere (USA?). Since you have had purchased the car from the Humphries' estate (in 2012 as I guess), this was the 750B or another car that was owned by Dooley. For further research it is necessary to know production and sales dates from Alfa Romeo records, the Bertone body number and the number of the engine as well as the precise dates from the logbook. TLA 955 might have been SVA #02609
Wow Martin !!!

That's the kind of posts which makes a Veloce's owner happy¨!!! Myself for example !

I always love to document my car's histories and, above all, to find at least an original picture showing the car when new or almost new. I must say I didn't succeed in every case but, all in all, I've been pretty successful with my quests.

The fact my car was sold to AUTOVOX makes me wonder whether they bought it for avertising purposes (but why buying a veloce and not just a sprint in that case?) or for their own director ?.

Coming back to Mr Humphries, he used to own another early sprint of 1956 registered under IIK 27 when his own
SVA #03948 was under 27II K.....rather confusing in fact.

I had to buy the two cars at the same time but I must confess I was not in need of two rather similar cars even tough the early sprint had a pretty good history.

Mme Humphries (again such a charming lady !) told me his late husband bought the sprint (normale) from his very good friend Lyal D.G.Collen, son of a whealthy Irish entrepreneur, who took part to the 1956 Tulip rally right after he bought the car. Again this car was registered in Ireland under IIK 27.

This car was in very rough condition, especially about shell corrosion, but very complete !

Funnily I understood from Mrs Humphries that the late Dermott bought his friend's car after his SVA #03948
but I understand here this should have been the contrary.

Let me illustrate my text with some pictures showing the 750B Sprint Normale IIK 27
1631535
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Collen tulpen Rallye 2.png
1631536
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Collen tulpen Rallye.png
1631537
alfa sprint collen.jpg
 

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In 2008 John Colley wrote to me that SVA #03948 was sold 19570625 by Thomson & Taylor to Autovox. So 19570625 was the sales date in the UK and not the recorded production date by Alfa Romeo. T&T had recorded their cars on a list which later was available for the British AROC members. A quick search in the WWW shows that Dermot S. Humphries owned a 1956 Sprint750B and a 1963 GiuliaTI in 1970 and participated in hill-climbs with the TI (see:Letters from readers, October 1970 - Motor Sport Magazine). He was son to an Irish politician and passed away 20110611-12 in his sleep at home in Dromin House. John Colley further wrote in 2008 that Humphries was owner of your car in the 1970s and later sold it to John Dooley who resold it elsewhere (USA?). Since you have had purchased the car from the Humphries' estate (in 2012 as I guess), this was the 750B or another car that was owned by Dooley. For further research it is necessary to know production and sales dates from Alfa Romeo records, the Bertone body number and the number of the engine as well as the precise dates from the logbook. TLA 955 might have been SVA #02609
This is the car 750B #01583 back in 2013 at the time I bought it at Dromin House.

See that the 1956 Tulip rally's enamel badge was still to be observed in good place over the glove box lid!

1631538
1631539
1631540
 

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I sold this car #01583 in 2016 if I'm right and I'm sure will see it around soon even though there was a lot of work
to be achieved in order to put it back to what it was when new.
In any case the car was worth the work !
 

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This made my day! Another one found. I have in the Sprint Veloce register 03948 with the production date and that it was imported to Thompson and Taylor. Now I can update the register to show the car exists. I will be in touch with you Marc.
 

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This news is good to see! I've been able to correct some flawed notes. Back in the 1980's or 1990's, John Colley also wrote to me of AR1493E*03948* and many other cars. I am not home to check my notes and original correspondence, but I recall receiving a few pages of notes (more than once) from John that were very tightly spaced and it was not always easy to distinguish which piece of information was associated with information located close-by on the same page. John informed me of many different cars, not just Alfa Romeo. There was another early SV which I call merely "Sprint Veloce", as I have found no indication that Alfa Romeo called the early cars either "alleggerita" or "lightweight". They were simply "Sprint Veloce" and it was the Veloce's build details that evolved while the name did not, aside from the "Confortevole" that was simply a transition model from one "Veloce" specification to another ... more than once. Regardless, there is another similar car that John described without a chassis number associated, but it was reportedly sold by John Dooley to (perhaps) the USA. Some confusions are possible! Also, Dermot Humphries has been reported at least once as "Dermot Humphrey". I cannot attribute this to John Colley. I will follow with another message that will share more, but this pane has become very slow to react and tedious to write in. More later! John
 
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