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Another thing, don’t add up how much you have spent on your project. I have kept a file on everything I purchased or spent but I will NEVER add it up.

Regarding the wire harness. I bought a aftermarket “Painless” harness. I wouldn’t do that again. It was not painless. Not a plug and play option like I thought it would be. If you need to sort yours I’d just buy a pre made one for you car from a UK vendor.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
RE: the wiring harness, I originally saw one priced at $2200 which is insane, but CA and others sell them for $600 or so which is totally reasonable, and I don't think I could make my own for less if I value my time at all, so I'll probably buy one. I will likely replace the factory fuse block with something that takes blade fuses, though.

Did some more work on the car lately, and discovered some annoying things. I took the front sway bar off, and the front brackets for that are tweaked pretty badly so new ones got added to the CA order:



Once I got it out, I noticed that the end links have been welded on:


Both sides are like that. The rubber and outer parts of the end links came off, but the inner sleeve is welded on, and it prevents the inner rubber mounts from coming off. I didn't feel like grinding so I left that for another day.

This is the inside of the driver's fender looking forward, definitely going to need a new outer headlight panel:



The inner one might be salvageable, and the passenger side seems ok. When the new front valence comes I'll see how they fit.

I did some exploratory paint removal, and found some things.




Bottom of the front passenger fender is rusty. I didn't strip the other side, both fenders are getting replaced so I don't care.



Passenger rear, doesn't look too bad.



Top of passenger front fender. Looks like this was trashed long ago and slathered with filler. Note that you can see my oil pan through a big hole.





B pillars are both cracked but the area isn't real rusty, which is good news.





Both rear fenders are buckled from a rear hit, and this one has obviously been badly repaired previously. Going to try to hammer these back into shape. The base of the rear windshield is also bent, I'm hoping I can get that back into shape with some pulling and hammering too. The rear valence is getting replaced, though.





The filler on the passenger sill was in fact covering a wavy gravy panel. No rust that I have uncovered, though, just looks like it got hit and they just covered it in filler. New outer sill ordered.



Passenger door has a convex crease here, looks like something rubbed against it and the crash bar inside the door made the crease. Will have to see what it looks like with the paint and filler stripped, I bought some door skin tools hoping I can save the hood and trunk and this door skin.



The back edge of the pass. door is bent back, too.



This is annoying, though. When the front passenger side got hit back in the day, the jabronies covered the inner fender skirt with filler and painted it the original color to try to hide it. Lame. These inner skirts aren't available repro that I have seen, so I'm going to have to try to fix it better once I get the outer sheet metal off.

Here's my toolbox:



I do boat repair, so I have to be mobile. I also have my crap spread around a couple different counties, storage is an issue when you live on a boat.

I got a package the other day. Christmas came early!



The people at the post office thought it was a dinosaur bone. I told them that was accurate.



Came all the way from Greece. Looks better than the one in my car.

It's a rainy day today, I think I might lock myself in the garage and strip the paint off the hood skin and see if I can't make it look presentable.
 

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Watching with admiration.
Pete
 
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I had my car detailed a couple of months back after I bought it and the guy there who measured my paint thickness before polishing told me I have fillers incredibly thick in some areas, more than he's ever seen on any car. So planning to have the car paint stripped off this summer and repainted and this thread isn't helping with my anxiety of what I am going to eventually find under my shiny red paint :oops:
 

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Amazing how much filler some people use. Here was the thickest part of my car. You couldn’t even tell at all before I started to strip the paint. Front corner.

1608571
 

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That is an impressive amount of filler. You would think it would take more time to put all the filler on, than to beat the metal in the rough shape and than add a skim of filler...
 

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Hello, AlfaBB. I am a idiot and a few months ago I bought this:...
Congratulations. It's nice to be reminded I'm not the only idiot who overpayed for one of these beautifully sculpted Italian turds. Best of luck on your restoration!
 

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The OP is one brave man.

This Bertone has clearly had a seriously hard life and to add insult to injury has been at the hands of some very nasty "repairers". They are animals!

The workmanship is shocking. Horrific lash ups.

The good thing is today you can get so many remade parts that weren't around in the 80's/90's

Good luck OP and I salute your tenacity and drive to get this Giulia in fine fettle!
 

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When my car went to the bead blaster to get the whole thing back to bare metal, the guys who did the job said that they had never seen so much filler on such a small car! In some places it was over an inch thick! When we put the car back on the trailer it was markedly lighter!!! You can see here the the horrors that where hiding underneath!
 

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Some of he repairs done in the past would not have met with factory appoval. Even though comments of the repairs being shocking and horrific we need to understand the reasons. Back in the day it may have been the result of a few things as I mentioned before like the 73 oil crisis, shortage of factory replacement panels and the DIY craze of the 80's(spurned on by the 80's financial crisis).
So keeping a small engine car going was an economic decision, that could only be done in a hurry thus the enormous amounts of plastic filler we see in this example. The key thing is the the body shell exists and escaped the metal recycling craze of the 90's etc. The factory are not making any more so with cars with various needs I think will come back to life one by one.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Happy New Year! I used the holiday to make some more progress on the car.

Two really big boxes showed up from the UK!



Lots of goodies there. What you're looking at are two front fenders, a front valence, a radiator support, a rear valence, both front floors, the frame rails that go under said floors, the front sway bar brackets, the outer passenger sill, and a front jack point. The used front crossmember I got previously is also in the mix. I realize that I forgot to order the filler panel between the radiator support and the front valence. Oh well, I doubt this is the last box I'm getting from CA.

Everything made it in record time (maybe a week?), and there was only some scratching on a coupe of the floor panels, and a couple dents on the radiator panel, but no big deal because those are going to be buried anyway.

Question for anybody that has used the Classic Alfa sheet metal, are the fenders and front valence meant to butt up perfectly or is there some overlap between them? There doesn't seem to be a lot of extra metal on either.

I also took apart more of the car. The steering column was puzzling me a bit, I've looked up the procedure and it seems like it's trivial for most people to remove the inner column. Mine wasn't really feeling like it wanted to budge. I thought maybe there was something hiding behind the turn signal stalks?



There wasn't. I did pull the key out of the shaft and a little tube and a spring came off the shaft behind the turn signal stalk assembly, but the aluminum bracket still didn't want to budge. How about the ignition key assembly, is that holding me on? Having the key in there didn't make a difference, so I pulled it off. Still not budging.

So will the whole thing come out through the hole in the firewall? I dunno, but the master cylinder is pretty in the way so let's get that out.



Might be hard to see there but our MIG artisan did some boogery repairs to the pivot for the clutch pedal, and the clutch pedal arm under the dash also appears to have been snapped in half and welded back together. Curious.

With that out of the way, these three bolts and the steering stop bracket come out and the box is free:





The answer is no, that bracket doesn't fit through the hole in the firewall. I scratched my head, and decided it was mallet time. I had most of the aluminum bracket pulled into the engine compartment, giving me plenty of room to whack at it. A moderate malleting and it popped off the shaft, meanwhile the fluid from the box was pouring out into the footwell. Good thing the carpet (and every other thing) was out of there.

I looked at the service records I got with the car and this box is a replacement, possibly from a '77 Spider. It appears that the shaft is possibly slightly bent. That may be what caused it to hang onto the bracket so dearly? Something to play with later.

Anyway, with the hydraulics and steering box out of the way, I got the rest of the exhaust manifold bolts off. I had to use a wobble socket on a couple of them, first time I've needed to use one of those in a while. Then I got under the car.



Disconnected the clutch hydraulic line.



And took apart this mess. Lots of leaks under the car, everything is coated in one fluid or another. I took the speedo cable off, removed the ground strap, removed the flex disk (total PITA), and unbolted the exhaust bracket from the exhaust and the trans mount from the body of the car. I thought I could leave those on the transmission and get the mess to fit out.

I was wrong.

Getting the exhaust bracket off is easy, three little bolts. Getting the trans mount off was weird, because the whole thing was flexing when I tried to loosen the bolt after I took the nut off. I tried an impact driver which was ineffective, and I didn't have enough travel using a combo wrench, but a socket wrench let me wind it up enough that it broke free.



Then it fit.



The super wide oil pan makes it very stable on my dolly.



There are some leaks.







Feels like progress to get the engine out. Now I really need to get some metal and make a cart for this thing so I can take the suspension and the rest of the drivetrain out. Then she's off to the stripper! :boobs:
 

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Good progress. Regarding the replacement panels. All the ones I got from either Classic Alfa or Alfaholics were butt welded. Unless there is an obvious flange where it would have originally been spot welded or something, I don't think any of them are lap welded. Assume modest trimming and/or massaging will be required to get things to fit perfectly..
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Not dead, I did fun things this weekend:





Finally welding up the body cart. I got it 40% welded up but the wind picked up which made things challenging. My welds are ugly enough with the shielding gas. Picked up some fasteners for the casters, I think I’m going to weld nuts on and bolt the casters on rather than welding them directly.

You can see in the foreground one of the pieces of 2.5 square that I cut a side off, fits nicely over the 2x2 and then I’ll weld the vertical supports to those so I can move them around if I want to. I figure I’ll drill a couple of holes in each and bolt them through the cart where I want them to land. The horizontal braces are welded in, I may cut them out and do the same thing so I can make them adjustable for the next project, but for now, they are going to work for the Alfa.

Once I get this cart done I can get it under the car and finish removing the suspension and drivetrain. Then I’ll slice off some bad sheet metal, and then send her off to the paint stripper. If you’re one of the six people watching my thread, it’s been a while since I made any progress. Having a toddler really kills your productivity damnit.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I finally have a reason to post again! Stupid quarantine, the car is living at my grandparents' house and I'm not allowed to go there so I don't infect them. I made some more progress with the cart.



The verticals are welded now. I just need to drill holes for through bolts to pin them once I know exactly where they will land side-to-side. Hopefully I got the spacing correct lengthwise. I also need to coat that thing with Ospho or something, it rusted up quickly!

The plan is to attach the verticals on the front where the steering box bolts on, the three bolts on the left:



And in the rear the three bolts next to the spring in this picture:



I'm pretty sure they will hold the car up, and I can get the rest of the suspension on/off with them there. With the 2" box I'll probably only be able to pick up one hole for each corner, so I'll probably get some 1/4" plate and make a bracket I can weld onto the cart verticals and catch all three holes.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Heyoooo more progress, finally got the rack under the car.



It's just resting on some blocks now, I need to get the vertical supports attached but I wanted to confirm how everything was lining up in case I needed to call an audible on my plan. It was only moderately sketchy getting it off the jack stands and onto the cart, I might bring the Quickjack with me next time.





Made some CAD templates for the mounting plates, gonna cut them out of 1/4" plate and weld them to the supports.
 

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Yes folks, I'm still at it. Finally got the car up on the cart!




I suck and wasn't accurate enough with marking the orientation of my backing plates so the holes didn't line up right, I was only able to catch one hole per corner. Which is fine, but annoying. I could've skipped the backing plates altogether and just drilled through the tubing alone. Oh well, live and learn.

Next, I finished removing the rear suspension and axle:



Also removed the front suspension. The front springs sit in pans, there's no room to get a spring compressor in there so here's the rig to get them out:




It’s 3/8” acme rod and some copper pipe sleeves. Take out two bolts and replace them with the rods, double-nutted at the top and the copper sleeve at the bottom to space the nut down so you can get at it. I wasn’t sure how sketchy it would be with only two rods so I got 2’ long ones, figuring I can cut them in half and have four 1’ rods if I needed. Turns out two rods is fine, and thanks to my super tall cart they fit under there easily.

And here are the funky repairs with the suspension out of the way:




We got a visit from the MIG fairy! That's going to be fun to clean up. It looks like the upper shock mounts were mangled at some point and some replacements boogered on. I have a replacement front crossmember if it comes to that.

After that I did more stripping off what little is left on the car, like brake lines and the heater box and lots of little bits. At this point the only stuff I have left to remove are in the doors, the window regulators and latches and such. I'm planning on doing that today. Then she's off to have her paint stripped.

My wheels have been turning since I watched an episode of Mike Brewer’s show where he visits EV West. There’s a quick shot in the episode of a BMW 2002 being converted to electric, and a light went off in my head - Alfa is similar size and spec to the ’02, wouldn’t be awesome to convert the Alfa to electric?

Yes, yes it would be.

The ‘traditional’ way to convert to electric is to replace the gas motor with an electric one, and leave the rest of the drivetrain intact. The guys at EV West do it to air-cooled Porsche/VWs, which works great because the whole package is tucked away at the back of the car. Once you get rid of the vestigial gasoline apparatus you have the whole rest of the car to hide batteries in. But to make this work well in the Alfa I want to remove as much weight as possible, and sacrifice the least space to batteries. Which brings me back to that 2002 conversion:



That’s a picture of the rear end where the motor will be. Instead of keeping the trans/diff, they are going to hang a Tesla motor/gearbox under the rear of the car, which frees up the whole engine compartment/tunnel for hiding batteries and shaves a bunch of weight. Nice!

It’s not quite as straightforward in the Alfa, sadly. The 2002 has an independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms. The Alfa has a live axle. So I will have to convert the Alfa to an IRS. I’ve been mulling over my options, and I’ve narrowed it down to this:


Option 1: semi-trailing arm rear suspension from a BMW E30/Z3
Pros: compact and relatively easy to fit, plentiful, gives me lots of space for motor.
Cons: not the greatest geometry, less adjustable


Option 2: Miata IRS
Pros: better handling, very adjustable
Cons: harder to modify subframe to fit in car and fit motor, probably need to make custom tube subframe to make it all work and fit

I would love to hear feedback/other suggestions if you have a better idea. Since the track of this car is so narrow (~50 inches in the rear) a lot of other obvious options are quite cumbersome (Tbird, Supra, etc. are much wider).

Also, the aforementioned 2002 swap is getting a Tesla motor, which is rad but I think it’s overkill for a car this small and light (and old). I’m leaning more toward using a Nissan Leaf motor, for a number of reasons: they are cheap and plentiful, smaller and lighter than Tesla units, similar power to the stock gas engine so it will perform comparably. This car is already super fun with the power it has, I don’t need to create a monster. (And you can get controllers that will bump the power above what Nissan runs…)

The big complaint with the Leaf is the early batteries aren’t as robust as some of the competition’s, so I’ll probably go with cells from somebody else. But the powertrain seems to be well-built and has been successfully swapped into other cars with good results.

I’ll swing by Pick-N-Pull and scope out the selection, maybe pull a subframe off a car so I can test fit it and see what it’s going to take to modify it.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
That 2002 is getting some reinforcement where the subframe mounts, to handle the >2x power the Tesla motor is going to send out. I will do something similar, but maybe not as extensive since the Leaf's power is not vastly greater than stock. Although the Alfa is known to be a bit floppy in the rear end, structurally...

This is how the powertrain looks mounted in a Leaf:



The PDM and inverter can be separated and mounted elsewhere, so it's just the motor/gearbox that needs to fit back there. I'm thinking the inverter and PDM can live under the trunk floor where the fuel tank was. That leaves me the engine compartment and (tiny) tunnel for batteries.

EDIT: This guy has a good teardown to get a sense of the size of these components: https://isopack.blogspot.com/2017/1...issan-leaf.html
 

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Discussion Starter #40
We have reached a milestone - there is nothing left on the shell that could be removed with anything but a saw.

I finished taking apart the doors, they still had the window regulators in them as well as the latches and exterior handles.



The window regulators are this cheesy affair with a cable that winds all around the door and runs over several of these plastic sheaves:




I'm not sure how to get those off. They aren't flexible enough (after 50 years anyway) to just pop on and off, and the pin seems to be peened to the door frame. There's no access to the back side of any of them, I'd have to dismantle the door skins. They are pretty wobbly but they all spin and none of them are broken so I'm going to punt on them for now. Other than those little puzzlers, the rest of the door stuff is straightforward.

On to the door jambs. This little bastard:



Somebody put a rivet in there. The rest of the fasteners are FH Allen bolts. The other side was all bolts, no rivet:



I don't know if it's factory to do a rivet on the driver's side, or if someone stripped a hole and said, 'a rivet will do'. Behind the latch plate on the rivet were these shims:



The passenger side had none.

And here it is, the last part I removed from the car:



Doing a walk-around to make sure I didn't miss anything I noticed the grommet for the rear license plate light wiring.

That's it! All stripped. I had a celebratory jug of kombucha.



Now it's time for this little guy to start getting worried.



Went to the Pick-N-Pull today, the website said they had a smattering of likely BMWs and one Miata. I didn't see the Miata right away but I did find a couple of BMWs. The first one was an E36 318ti. Unfortunately, one of the RTABs was bent in, but I grabbed it and kept walking. That car also had some pretty new-looking shocks and Bav Auto springs, which I grabbed.




Then I found an E30 325i convertible. The bushings were clearly dead but it was straight so I upgraded.



I'm going back in a couple of days and I'll get the subframe out of the Miata (and more **** for other cars :V). There are a few salvaged Leafs being auctioned in the next couple of days that I'm going to bid on as well. I got some bad news from the paint-stripping company when I called to arrange for them to strip the thing - they are booked three months out. ****. I'm hoping that they are just being conservative with their estimate (she said they had about 50 cars in line ahead of me) but I can take this time to hack off some of the mangled sheet metal and start figuring out how to fit this mess under the car.
 
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