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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm getting ready to bring my 87 in for an alignment.
I'm aware of the specs in the Owners Manual and Shop Manual, but wonder if anything should change when deviating from stock wheel/tire sizes.

The Shop Manual diagram (page 00-73) lists 1/8" toe and goes as far as mentioning the wheel diameter assumed to be 14". On the Quad with 15", do you still use 1/8"? I have 16" wheels, and wonder if I should still use 1/8".

Caster is listed as 1.5 deg assuming stock which would typically be 185 or 195 if a Quad. My tires are 205. Centerline's website suggests 2-3 degrees for 205 width tires to help limit wider tires tendancy to follow road surface irregularities (which my car exhibits a bit). Are you guys generally in agreement with the extra caster?

I don't have adjustable upper control arms, so we'll see how my camber comes in to see if I should get them. Shop manual states +0.3 deg which assumes stock and Centerline - 0.5 deg for 14" or 15" which is completely opposite. What would be recommended for 205 wide tires on 16" wheels for spirited road driving?

Thanks
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Generally a bit more caster is better on these cars, though you're somewhat limited in how much you can dial in.

For toe I would think the stock spec is fine (the 14" is probably mentioned because the spec is from rim-to-rim, so at equal toe angle a 16" wheel will measure a bit more toe in inches than a 14", but that's probably within the noise.)

The main thing is to make sure they set toe properly. You have a steering box, and there is a very specific procedure they need to follow that is documented in the service manual. Most shops only know how to align rack & pinion, and they'll do the alignment via the outer tie rods only. When they're done it'll look okay on the printout but it'll be all farked up. See here:


For camber without the adjustable arms its kind of you get what you get.
 

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I'll be surprised if they get it right. all they want to do is look at their computor screen.....when manually does it correctly
You get odd looks from them already when you ask them to put weights on the seats!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'll be surprised if they get it right. all they want to do is look at their computor screen.....when manually does it correctly
You get odd looks from them already when you ask them to put weights on the seats!

I hear ya! I'm going to shop owned by somebody that I know. I'm going to review with him and insist we follow all the info that I will be bringing. We'll see how it goes. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another question...
I think the answer is no, but want to ask... does changing the camber on one side have any affect on the other?
My camber was found to be -0.4 deg on the driver side and +0.9 on the passenger.
I was thinking of getting an adjustable arm just for the passenger side to pull it in.
I only did my front suspension about 10k miles ago, so everything is tight so there is no need to replace the driver side, unless adjusting the passenger side will negatively impact the driver side. Not to mention, why spend double the money and do double the work if not needed.

Thanks.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Funny you mention that: I'm doing a bunch of suspension work on the GTV and measured camber & caster yesterday. With my weight in the driver's seat I had -0.75 deg on the left and +1.0 on the right, so pretty close to yours. Spec on my GTV with car fully weighted is +20' +/- 30' (so say +0.8 to -0.2) though most folks with adjustable arms seem to target -1 or so.

Anyway, camber on each side should be independent, though only installing one adjustable arm offends my engineering sensibilities :LOL: Me, I think I'm just going to leave it as-is for now.
 
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