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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the process of taking my '74 Junior 1600 apart. I intend to take apart the suspension, sandblast everything, re-paint, new bushes, tie rod ends, ball joints and so on. Something like this:



The glitch is, I have to paint the steel parts the factory original colour (the inspection guys are rather strict about that here), but what colour were they? I found tons of pictures about Spider suspenisons, but they are all re-conditioned. I looked in all the original sales materials I could find, but of course you can't see anything behind the wheels. (I don't know... where these damned things even painted?!)
I guess they must have been flat black. But with Italians, you never know... Any better ideas, anybody?
 

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1966-2013
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Semi-gloss/satin black is what I believe would be on the stock parts, at least that's what I was finding evidence of. (might have been gloss once forever ago, or mabe not :shrug: )

If you're going to go through all that, myhaps powdercoating is in your future?

It'll certainly last years longer than any kind of paint you use.
 

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Semi-gloss/satin black is what I believe would be on the stock parts, at least that's what I was finding evidence of. (might have been gloss once forever ago, or mabe not :shrug: )

If you're going to go through all that, myhaps powdercoating is in your future?

It'll certainly last years longer than any kind of paint you use.
Powder coating is good, but adds a lot of weight and might make things not fit together/go back on properly due to the extra thick coating.

As far as I can tell all the components come out of the factory black. I doubt they are strict enough to fail you for "not using a gloss finish", as long as you have the right colour.

Good luck, love to see pics when you get them painted and before they go back on.
 

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Original was about a 60% gloss black. If an original look is desired, I would shy away from powdercoating since, at a thickness of 2.5+ mil, it will fill in all of the texturing of the original component. You'll be able to look at the part and tell it's been powdercoated. Electrocoating on the other hand, at only about 0.7 mil thick, leaves the original texturing of the substrate and, in my opinion, looks exactly as original.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies. I have some experience with powdercoating, while it's a fascinating technology I wouldn't recommend it here. This electro-coating thingy, however, is interesting, I'm looking into it. But how would you prevent the paint to stick on the machined (and not-paintable) surfaces? Normally, one would simply mask them, but if you submerge the part in a solution, it's going to penetrate the masking (to some degree, at least), not?
 

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A variety pack of silicon slugs, plugs and caps would cure that issue.

Otherwise on bits you couldn't plug as they're on the 'outside' and exposed, (EG: the part on the lower control arms where the balljoint goes), one could plate then polish the plating off the machine surfaces if it was interfering with the fit of things.
 
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