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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Guys!

I own a perfect running 1600 GT Junior single headlamp non "unificato" '72....with the 00536 Engine

The more I dig into the alfa world the more I lust towards a scalino (stepnose)... I know its merely a question of taste and I will not argue against this since this leads to never ending dicussions.

For me, the more I lust towards a stepnose the more I lust towards an early one, which leads to guess what... yes...a 1600 model ("Sprint GT" or a "Sprint GT veloce")

But it seems that prices for good ones are going up to sky level... which brings me down to a more grounding question... is the 1300 engine sufficient to bring a smile on my face...?

Would it be wise to have an early 1300 scalino, and swap the engine to a 1600?

Advice from those who know (i.e. have the experience) would be appreciate.

Kind regards

Toli0815
 

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That depends on you really. If you kept the original 1300 stashed safely away, I don't think it would be too much of a sin to go to a 1600.

But the 1300 actually is pretty good, and you could tune it to make it more drivable. It's a little like the 1300 in the Fulvia, you'd never guess the engine was so small with the way they go.

I once put 10548 cams in a 1300 and the owner was very pleased with the result. I also know someone who had a 1300 Stepnose who had a 2000 in it, and it was a very nice car.
 

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Which country do you live in and what sort of driving do you do? If its a weekend car in Monaco that you'll put 1000 miles a year on, I'd bet it doesn't make a huge difference. If you live in Montana and plan ten times that millage....

As said above, cores of all displacement are inexpensive and swapping a motor on a step nose is a simple task. If its the car you love, get one! The good news is that they are only getting (slowly) more valuable, so you can enjoy your indulgence guilt free, knowing its holding if not increasing its value. I too am smitten by them, especially the first series Giulia Sprint GT. Amazing how right he got it the first time.
 

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I find the 1300 cc street versions somewhat anemic in modern driving conditions. Keep the 1300 in a box and get a twin spark 2000 with Webers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi all,

Ok so far the common point I can read out of your replies is: the 1300 Engine is a bit mmmh... to foible, and it should be swapped against something more powerfull (not revy, since 1300's are known to be revy :) )

Wel I have to make up my mind, because all in all I also consider originality (integrity) one of the things important to the car and me...

But as said keeping the 1300 engine, crated safely aside, and swapping it for a 1600 or even a nasty 2000 could effectively do the trick and be the path to follow.

Thanks for your input and best regards

Toli0815
 

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A strong 2 L makes the 101s and 105s a delight to drive.

In a number of stages, Alfa increased engine displacement, but the marketing side would add weight through "creature comforts".

Add torque without adding weight!!!!

Particularly if you drive in the mountains.

:ninja:
 

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Those smooth nose single headlight coupes are not common in North America nor else where I expect.

One of the nicest looking, best handling and fast (lighter) such smooth nose single head light GT I have come across was a red 1300 converted to 1750 with Miglia Miglia wheels and wide tires.

I liked the aggressive look and stance it had. Was it better looking than a GTA, well no, but better than a steel body scalino with the correct grill centre with chrome above the lip. Of course a GTA grill center fixes that.

As you will have hanging pedals and Hydraulic clutch the conversion to 1750 or 2000 is very easy compared to putting a larger engine into a manual clutch setup but that too is commonly done.

all IMHO and FWIW.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi there,

Ok so from what I read, the best of both worlds would be:

1) to take a "second series Stepnose" the one with the hanging pedals... swap the engine for a good and well boosted 2l.

That's for the mechanical part of it...

2) I would add the earlier dash-board (but that's my taste :))

Thanks a lot
 

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I'm pretty sure the stepnose Juniors still have standing pedals - they're just hydraulic rather than mechanical. I had a 1970 stepnose Junior and that's the way it was built, anyway.

I think to get hanging pedals you'd need to go with a smoothnose car.
 

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Hi Toli
1. All step-nose Juniors have standing pedals, but as already mentioned 69-70 do have hydr. clutch.
2. Early dashboards are very, very difficult to find in good condition - you can probably guess what the rarity does to the price :-/ In my opinion modifying is not the way to go. Get a car you like and keep it as original as possibly. It's a lot easier and cheaper!

My dream car was a 1600 GTV from 1966-67 but as I was 10k $ short of buying a good one, I decided to settle for a 1300 Junior from 1969. I have driven it for 3 years now, and it is not very often I feel a need for more performance. As long as your annual mileage will be limited and mainly on B-roads, the 1300 cc engine will do fine. It is sweet revving engine, and I know from experience that the improvement in performance from a 1600 cc isn't that big.
Keep in mind, if you rebuild a Junior with a 2000 cc engine you should also use the bigger brakes from the 2000 GTV. That is not a bolt-on job, as far as I know you'll have to use 2000 GTV spindles as well.

Just my 2 cent
 
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