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2015 Chevy (Holden) SS, 1989 Milano (Shankle Sport), 1991 164S
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In that pdf, there is a photograph of the top of a sender, with a green dot indicating where the hole should be drilled to relieve pressure inside the sender can. That green dot is shown on the wrong side of the top of the can. The drill location should be on the opposite side from the vertical groove in the can, whereas the photo shows a green location dot adjacent to the groove. The internal mechanism is inside the can under that erroneous location, so you don't want to drill there. The can is empty on the other side.
 

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2015 Chevy (Holden) SS, 1989 Milano (Shankle Sport), 1991 164S
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll try. Have to see if I've got an old sender laying about in my stash.
 

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Now you tell me. Night before last I went out to my 164 with my little Dremel tool and a #50-ish drill bit, and drilled a hole in the oil pressure sender (in place on the car, a bit tricky getting the drill motor down there). Seemed to make no difference in the readings, but at least I don't seem to have made matters worse. Drilled hole pretty near the connector but otherwise didn't orient it relative to anything.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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There are several manufacturers of oil pressure senders, so I suspect it may not be consistent from sender to sender
 

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2015 Chevy (Holden) SS, 1989 Milano (Shankle Sport), 1991 164S
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just discovered the error in that "roadtrip" pdf last night while reviewing it for a poster. Sorry, I didn't check it when it first came out. The correct location is described in my original posting from before the pdf issuance.

It is possible that if drilled in the erroneous location, the mechanism inside under that location may end up being damaged, thus no change in reading, or lack of. The other side, opposite the vertical groove in the sender can, has no mechanism under it, so safe to put a hole in that location. Lol, I happen to have several very long (one foot or longer) aerospace drills which can reach a very long way. Got a couple from my father's aircraft repair tool sollection, but the local "tool time" shop also has some. Very handy for this sort of situation.

It is correct that there are several different aftermarket senders, but the "roadtrip" calibration curves are for the former Sunpro model, now produced by Bosch I guess. I guess I would regard those curves as still valid for that particular model.

The thought did occur to me that there may be a really big socket, with a matching internal protruding stub to match the vertical groove of the sender can, used to easily remove and reinstall the original sender. I've thought about making such a "socket" but since I use the Bosch/Sunpro version, no longer have a need.
 

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2015 Chevy (Holden) SS, 1989 Milano (Shankle Sport), 1991 164S
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Agreed, this "hole drilling" fix is ONLY for the original Alfa supplied Veglia sender for the Milano and 164. I haven't looked at the innerds of any other senders.
 
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