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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, I was lucky enough to find a Green 74 Spider that's in really very good shape The engine has not been started in 15 years, but it only has 27K original miles of road wear time. As far as engine work goes, this is what I had in mind.
1. Clean/ De-grease engine
2. Drain gas tank then power wash inside of it?
3. Engine tune up

I was planning on utilizing the Alfa Spider Twin Cam Tune up book as an aid to this process. I would rather learn how to do it myself, then pay someone. The guy I bought my Spider from was a real nice guy. The car was his dad's, who had passed. To this end, I assured him that I would take good care of it and plan to pass Scooter on to my son . Well that's it fellas, if you can help me out I sure would appreciate it.
 

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I found the responses I got in this thread quite helpful. Among them was a link to this page which may be right up your alley.

The only thing that seems odd in your plan is power-washing the inside of the tank. I wouldn't want to introduce water into the fuel system.

Hope this helps,

Ruedi
 

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74 Scooter said:
2. Drain gas tank then power wash inside of it?
Sorry, washing the tank is a bad idea. Can you say R-U-S-T!

I would:

1) Change oil, including oil in cam galleys and logic section of FI pump
2) Flush and refill coolant
3) Put a capful of light oil in each cylinder, turn engine over by hand, let sit overnight
4) Drain tank and refill with fresh gas
5) Install fresh plugs, cap, rotor, battery
6) Disconnect coil wire and crank motor to build oil pressure
7) Fire her up

Joe
 

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The fuel system is your primary concern. SPICA fuel injection pumps can be severely damaged if they are abandoned for long periods and not "pickled." Same for the fuel supply pump. The old fuel turns to varnish, dries up, and clogs everything from the pump to the fuel injectors. If you're lucky, the bores and plungers or the check valves of the injection pump aren't damaged from corrosion.

That said, there are two ways to approach this. One is the "Do you feel lucky" approach . . . . "Well, do ya . . . punk?" (apologies to Inspector Harry Callahan). This involves doing the minimum and seeing if you get lucky:

1. Drain the fuel tank. Remove the sending unit and inspect the interior for corrosion. Remove tank and send to radiator shop for cleaning if rusty or dirty. Don't try and use a dirty tank . . . it's just going to clog up your rear fuel filter in a big hurry.
2. Replace all the rubber hosing in the fuel system. Do it. This is a safety issue.
3. Remove the fuel supply pump and flush it out with some gasoline. Do not run it dry. Expect the pump to be toast, but you might get lucky. Replace the cleaned out pump.
4. Replace the rear fuel filter . . . Wix 33299 or equivilent.
5. Remove the front fuel filter assembly from the car and clean it thoroghly.
6. With the hoses off the injection pump, remove the inlet and outlet fittings. Spray a bunch of carb cleaner in the fuel galleries until it's coming out clear the other side. Check the outlet (front) fitting's restrictor clear. Reinstall the rear fitting. Temporarily, in place of the front (restrictor fitting) use a fitting with no restrictor like the rear inlet. The idea here is to flush the pump out with gasoline and get as much crud out of it as possible. If you use the restrictor fitting, you're not going to get a good flush. If you need a spare open fitting, I can loan you one.
7. Hook up the new hoses only instead of routing the injection pump outlet hose back to the front fuel fitting, attach a temporary long piece of hose and run it into a bucket on the side of the car. Cap off the open fitting on the front fuel filter.
8. Replace the injection pump oil filter and clean out the sludge in the filter housing.
9. Put a couple gallons of fuel in the tank.
10. Turn the key on while someone holds the fuel line into the bucket. After a few seconds there should be a good flow of fuel into the bucket and running clear. Let at least a gallon run through the pump, then replace the restrictor fitting and return line hose to the front fuel filter.
11. At this point you're ready to attempt a start. Make sure you have fresh fluids and filters in the engine. With the spark plugs OUT, motor the engine for about 30 seconds to prime the fuel pipes from the injection pump to the fuel injectors. Look for a little oil pressure. Afterwards, you should be smelling some fuel in the intakes and cylinders. Replace the spark plugs.
12. Spray some ether starting fluid in the intake manifold bores (just keep the air box off) and attempt a start in earnest.
13. Once the engine starts, expect a rough idle until the fuel pipes are completely primed and the check valves are exercised and sealing well.

To do a really good job of re-awaking the fuel injection system, I'd:

1. Remove the injection pump, fuel pipes and injectors and inspect and clean them on the bench. Flush out the logic section with fresh oil. Remove the barometric compensator and check the link spring for rust.
2. Bench test the thermostatic actuator.


What you'll likely find and the associated cost:
1. Inop fuel supply pump ($160)
2. Corroded fuel tank ($65 for cleaning)
3. Inop thermostatic actuator ($120-180)
4. New filters ($20)

If the injection pump has been allowed to corrode it's going to need an overhaul . . . . $750, part only.

If you want a tutorial on the fuel supply system troubleshooting, go over to www.wesingram.com and download the fuel supply system guide that's there in PDF. format.

I'll say it again for those that don't believe it . . . letting a SPICA injected Alfa sit derelict for long periods is about the surest way to wreck it that I can think of.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info guys, will work on removing the gas tank this wknd. I have no idea on how to identify all these parts so, I'll look through the Alfa books to figure some of the fuel injection stuff out. No doubt I'll be back here again with more questions. Will keep you posted on my progress.
 
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